A Gardening forum. GardenBanter.co.uk

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » GardenBanter.co.uk forum » Regional Gardening Discussions » Australia
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Little green caterpillars



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 30-12-2015, 08:59 AM posted to aus.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Little green caterpillars

How dis these little green caterpillars get up on my elevated tomato
seedlings and eat all the leaves?spose some naughty moth flew up and
laid them when I was not looking?
Ads
  #2  
Old 03-01-2016, 11:07 PM posted to aus.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 149
Default Little green caterpillars

Once upon a time on usenet F Murtz wrote:
How dis these little green caterpillars get up on my elevated tomato
seedlings and eat all the leaves?spose some naughty moth flew up and
laid them when I was not looking?


Probably - or a butterfly. You really need to watch them 24/7 to be sure. Or
just remove the caterpillars when you find them and incinerate them - before
they eat *all* of the leaves is good.
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)


  #3  
Old 03-01-2016, 11:41 PM posted to aus.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Little green caterpillars

On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 12:07:54 +1300, "~misfit~"
wrote:

Once upon a time on usenet F Murtz wrote:
How dis these little green caterpillars get up on my elevated tomato
seedlings and eat all the leaves?spose some naughty moth flew up and
laid them when I was not looking?


Probably - or a butterfly. You really need to watch them 24/7 to be sure. Or
just remove the caterpillars when you find them and incinerate them - before
they eat *all* of the leaves is good.


Yep. If there's a lot of caterpillars/seedlings, I can recommend
Yate's Success. It's just a spray on bacteria which is perfectly safe,
unless you happen to be a caterpillar, sawfly larvae or similar.
Highly effective.
  #4  
Old 06-01-2016, 10:08 AM posted to aus.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Little green caterpillars

Jeus wrote:
On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 12:07:54 +1300, "~misfit~"
wrote:

Once upon a time on usenet F Murtz wrote:
How dis these little green caterpillars get up on my elevated tomato
seedlings and eat all the leaves?spose some naughty moth flew up and
laid them when I was not looking?


Probably - or a butterfly. You really need to watch them 24/7 to be sure. Or
just remove the caterpillars when you find them and incinerate them - before
they eat *all* of the leaves is good.


Yep. If there's a lot of caterpillars/seedlings, I can recommend
Yate's Success. It's just a spray on bacteria which is perfectly safe,
unless you happen to be a caterpillar, sawfly larvae or similar.
Highly effective.


It was strange because I had two lots, 10 cups big tomatoes ten cups
tiny tomato strains in the one tray and they only ate the large variety
seedlings.have since sprinkled tomato dust on, don't know if that works
and if new leaves will come.
  #5  
Old 06-01-2016, 08:02 PM posted to aus.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Little green caterpillars

On Wed, 06 Jan 2016 21:08:03 +1100, F Murtz
wrote:

Jeus wrote:
On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 12:07:54 +1300, "~misfit~"
wrote:

Once upon a time on usenet F Murtz wrote:
How dis these little green caterpillars get up on my elevated tomato
seedlings and eat all the leaves?spose some naughty moth flew up and
laid them when I was not looking?

Probably - or a butterfly. You really need to watch them 24/7 to be sure. Or
just remove the caterpillars when you find them and incinerate them - before
they eat *all* of the leaves is good.


Yep. If there's a lot of caterpillars/seedlings, I can recommend
Yate's Success. It's just a spray on bacteria which is perfectly safe,
unless you happen to be a caterpillar, sawfly larvae or similar.
Highly effective.


It was strange because I had two lots, 10 cups big tomatoes ten cups
tiny tomato strains in the one tray and they only ate the large variety
seedlings.


Strange.

have since sprinkled tomato dust on, don't know if that works
and if new leaves will come.


I guess that should work? Good luck with it.
  #6  
Old 09-01-2016, 03:14 AM posted to aus.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default Little green caterpillars


"F Murtz" wrote in message
eb.com...
Jeus wrote:
On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 12:07:54 +1300, "~misfit~"
wrote:

Once upon a time on usenet F Murtz wrote:
How dis these little green caterpillars get up on my elevated tomato
seedlings and eat all the leaves?spose some naughty moth flew up and
laid them when I was not looking?

Probably - or a butterfly. You really need to watch them 24/7 to be
sure. Or
just remove the caterpillars when you find them and incinerate them -
before
they eat *all* of the leaves is good.


Yep. If there's a lot of caterpillars/seedlings, I can recommend
Yate's Success. It's just a spray on bacteria which is perfectly safe,
unless you happen to be a caterpillar, sawfly larvae or similar.
Highly effective.


It was strange because I had two lots, 10 cups big tomatoes ten cups tiny
tomato strains in the one tray and they only ate the large variety
seedlings.have since sprinkled tomato dust on, don't know if that works
and if new leaves will come.


Last year I bought some yellow cherry tomatoes from the supermarket, I
enjoyed the taste so volunteered a couple of tomatoes in to what would have
been a fallow piece of ground. Considering there were only 2 or 3 tomatoes
squeezed over the ground and raked in I have a good crop. However I have,
randomly, red cherry tomatoes in amongst the plants. Back on topic, if I
find any worms in the tomatoes they, so far, have only been in the red
tomatoes. I am guessing that, like me, the bugs in my garden are
traditionalists and don't believe tomatoes should be anything but red. The
red and the yellow both taste fine and straight off the vine they taste
great.

Mike


  #7  
Old 19-01-2016, 01:40 AM posted to aus.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 149
Default Little green caterpillars

Once upon a time on usenet Bloke Down The Pub wrote:
"F Murtz" wrote in message
eb.com...
Jeus wrote:
On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 12:07:54 +1300, "~misfit~"
wrote:

Once upon a time on usenet F Murtz wrote:
How dis these little green caterpillars get up on my elevated
tomato seedlings and eat all the leaves?spose some naughty moth
flew up and laid them when I was not looking?

Probably - or a butterfly. You really need to watch them 24/7 to be
sure. Or
just remove the caterpillars when you find them and incinerate
them - before
they eat *all* of the leaves is good.

Yep. If there's a lot of caterpillars/seedlings, I can recommend
Yate's Success. It's just a spray on bacteria which is perfectly
safe, unless you happen to be a caterpillar, sawfly larvae or
similar. Highly effective.


It was strange because I had two lots, 10 cups big tomatoes ten cups
tiny tomato strains in the one tray and they only ate the large
variety seedlings.have since sprinkled tomato dust on, don't know if
that works and if new leaves will come.



It probably will. The active ingrediant in most 'tomato dust' is Carbaryl,
an extremely insect-toxic synthetic chemical manufactured by Bayer. I hate
the stuff but admit to having used it (carefully) a couple of times on wasps
nest - because I hate wasps as much and can't control where they get to.

Last year I bought some yellow cherry tomatoes from the supermarket, I
enjoyed the taste so volunteered a couple of tomatoes in to what
would have been a fallow piece of ground. Considering there were
only 2 or 3 tomatoes squeezed over the ground and raked in I have a
good crop. However I have, randomly, red cherry tomatoes in amongst
the plants.


That's not unusual at all. By far most of the tomatoes sold in supermarkets
are at the least hybrids (which don't breed true) and just as likely
genetically engineered*.

* Australia's first genetically engineered commercial tomato variety was
imported from the US in 1993. Tomato fruits are 'designed' by nature to go
soft and break down not long after ripening so that the flesh of the fruit
releases the seeds and becomes compost for the new plants. Researchers
isolated the gene responsible for this and, although they couldn't remove it
(then at least) they found that, by using a virus to inject another copy of
the gene into the DNA of the plant the two copies cancelled each other out.
The result was tomatoes that stay firm for up to 10 days after ripening.

Since then, due to public backlash the companies doing the GE are more
secretive so the gods only know what's going on with current commercial
varieties. All I know is that most tomatoes bought in the last decade leave
a 'cucumberish' aftertaste in my oesophagus for hours (trans-genetic
engineering?) and as I dislike cucumbers I mostly refuse to buy them. I say
'mostly' because as I get older sometimes my eyes over-rule my memory and I
see some tomatoes that look and feel awesome (which after all is the only
things they're engineered for) so buy a few - only to regret it after eating
them.

Back on topic, if I find any worms in the tomatoes they,
so far, have only been in the red tomatoes. I am guessing that, like
me, the bugs in my garden are traditionalists and don't believe
tomatoes should be anything but red. The red and the yellow both
taste fine and straight off the vine they taste great.


I find them on my hybrids, on any tomatoes actually fairly randomly. I think
it's just where the moth (?) manages to get to to lay eggs. I was a bit late
in hand-removing one the other day and it's pupated inside a curled leaf and
silk 'nest'. It was quite fragile but I've tried to not damage it and have
it in a jar and am waiting to see what emerges. Are we all talking about the
green 'inchworm' type larvae that only have legs at the front and back of
the body?
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)


  #8  
Old 20-01-2016, 03:34 AM posted to aus.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 149
Default Little green caterpillars

Once upon a time on usenet ~misfit~ wrote:
Once upon a time on usenet Bloke Down The Pub wrote:
"F Murtz" wrote in message
eb.com...
Jeus wrote:
On Mon, 4 Jan 2016 12:07:54 +1300, "~misfit~"
wrote:

Once upon a time on usenet F Murtz wrote:
How dis these little green caterpillars get up on my elevated
tomato seedlings and eat all the leaves?spose some naughty moth
flew up and laid them when I was not looking?

Probably - or a butterfly. You really need to watch them 24/7 to
be sure. Or
just remove the caterpillars when you find them and incinerate
them - before
they eat *all* of the leaves is good.

Yep. If there's a lot of caterpillars/seedlings, I can recommend
Yate's Success. It's just a spray on bacteria which is perfectly
safe, unless you happen to be a caterpillar, sawfly larvae or
similar. Highly effective.

It was strange because I had two lots, 10 cups big tomatoes ten cups
tiny tomato strains in the one tray and they only ate the large
variety seedlings.have since sprinkled tomato dust on, don't know if
that works and if new leaves will come.



It probably will. The active ingrediant in most 'tomato dust' is
Carbaryl, an extremely insect-toxic synthetic chemical manufactured
by Bayer. I hate the stuff but admit to having used it (carefully) a
couple of times on wasps nest - because I hate wasps as much and
can't control where they get to.
Last year I bought some yellow cherry tomatoes from the supermarket,
I enjoyed the taste so volunteered a couple of tomatoes in to what
would have been a fallow piece of ground. Considering there were
only 2 or 3 tomatoes squeezed over the ground and raked in I have a
good crop. However I have, randomly, red cherry tomatoes in amongst
the plants.


That's not unusual at all. By far most of the tomatoes sold in
supermarkets are at the least hybrids (which don't breed true) and


Eeek! My bad. I should have written "F1 hybrids" rather than just 'hybrids'.
I'm used to using the term hybrid to mean F1 hybrid with regards to tomatoes
and wether to keep seed.
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)

just as likely genetically engineered*.

* Australia's first genetically engineered commercial tomato variety
was imported from the US in 1993. Tomato fruits are 'designed' by
nature to go soft and break down not long after ripening so that the
flesh of the fruit releases the seeds and becomes compost for the new
plants. Researchers isolated the gene responsible for this and,
although they couldn't remove it (then at least) they found that, by
using a virus to inject another copy of the gene into the DNA of the
plant the two copies cancelled each other out. The result was
tomatoes that stay firm for up to 10 days after ripening.
Since then, due to public backlash the companies doing the GE are more
secretive so the gods only know what's going on with current
commercial varieties. All I know is that most tomatoes bought in the
last decade leave a 'cucumberish' aftertaste in my oesophagus for
hours (trans-genetic engineering?) and as I dislike cucumbers I
mostly refuse to buy them. I say 'mostly' because as I get older
sometimes my eyes over-rule my memory and I see some tomatoes that
look and feel awesome (which after all is the only things they're
engineered for) so buy a few - only to regret it after eating them.

Back on topic, if I find any worms in the tomatoes they,
so far, have only been in the red tomatoes. I am guessing that, like
me, the bugs in my garden are traditionalists and don't believe
tomatoes should be anything but red. The red and the yellow both
taste fine and straight off the vine they taste great.


I find them on my hybrids, on any tomatoes actually fairly randomly.
I think it's just where the moth (?) manages to get to to lay eggs. I
was a bit late in hand-removing one the other day and it's pupated
inside a curled leaf and silk 'nest'. It was quite fragile but I've
tried to not damage it and have it in a jar and am waiting to see
what emerges. Are we all talking about the green 'inchworm' type
larvae that only have legs at the front and back of the body?




 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright 2004-2017 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.