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Using pet rabbit manure as compost



 
 
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  #1  
Old 04-02-2008, 07:27 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?
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  #2  
Old 04-02-2008, 09:09 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 2,265
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

In article
,
Sarah Still wrote:

I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?


Never apply fresh manure after the garden is planted. I've used it 2
months before planting and have had no problems. Hot composted
manure/hay mixture is no problem at anytime.
--

Billy

Bush, Cheney & Pelosi, Behind Bars
http://rachelcorriefoundation.org/site/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Movemen...George_W._Bush

  #3  
Old 04-02-2008, 09:48 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1,326
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

In article
,
Sarah Still wrote:

I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?


Be careful with rabbit compost.
It tends to be acidic.

Always compost it for at least a year.
--
Peace, Om

"Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
-- Mark Twain
  #4  
Old 04-02-2008, 09:54 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
z
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Posts: 205
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

On Feb 4, 1:27*pm, Sarah Still wrote:
I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?


The local ag station, which is highly regarded, tests find that rabbit
manure composted is even better than chicken manure, which is pretty
darn good.
as everybody says, compost it first is the best idea.
  #5  
Old 07-02-2008, 01:58 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 79
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

On Feb 4, 12:27*pm, Sarah Still wrote:
I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?


I've read that rabbits only digest 25% of the food they eat, the
remaining 75% cycles through their system as unused plant fiber.
That's why rabbits are often seen eating their dried poop - it still
has lots of nourishment. That said, there should not be much
difference between it and plant mulch.

KC
  #6  
Old 21-02-2008, 10:03 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
z
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 205
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

On Feb 6, 7:58*pm, KC wrote:
On Feb 4, 12:27*pm, Sarah Still wrote:

I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?


I've read that rabbits only digest 25% of the food they eat, the
remaining 75% cycles through their system as unused plant fiber.
That's why rabbits are often seen eating their dried poop - it still
has lots of nourishment. *That said, there should not be much
difference between it and plant mulch.

KC


that's one of the oddities of the animal world. rabbits have a similar
digestive cycle as ruminants (cows, sheep, goats, deer, buffalo, etc);
bacteria in their stomach digest the plant matter and that generates
more food value. but whereas the ruminants have an extra stomach to do
the work, then they "chew the cud", wherefrom they get their name,
rabbits don't have that; so they have to poop it out then eat it a
second time. i gather that the first pass and second pass are
different enough for the bunnies to know which to eat.
  #7  
Old 22-02-2008, 12:34 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 73
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

On Thu, 21 Feb 2008 13:03:42 -0800 (PST), z
wrote:

On Feb 6, 7:58*pm, KC wrote:
On Feb 4, 12:27*pm, Sarah Still wrote:

I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?


I've read that rabbits only digest 25% of the food they eat, the
remaining 75% cycles through their system as unused plant fiber.
That's why rabbits are often seen eating their dried poop - it still
has lots of nourishment. *That said, there should not be much
difference between it and plant mulch.

KC


that's one of the oddities of the animal world. rabbits have a similar
digestive cycle as ruminants (cows, sheep, goats, deer, buffalo, etc);
bacteria in their stomach digest the plant matter and that generates
more food value. but whereas the ruminants have an extra stomach to do
the work, then they "chew the cud", wherefrom they get their name,
rabbits don't have that; so they have to poop it out then eat it a
second time. i gather that the first pass and second pass are
different enough for the bunnies to know which to eat.


There seems to be a lot of misconception about rabbits 'eating their
own poop'. They don't just eat any old poop.
Coprophagy, as the practice is known, involves only one type of feces.
It's one consumed mainly at night, therefore, 'night feces'. Compared
with the hard, dry pellets of 'day feces', these night feces are soft
and are contained in a mucous membrane. The rabbit normally ingests
these 'night feces' directly from the anus.
It's all part of the rabbit's method of B vitamin synthesis.

Ross.
  #8  
Old 22-02-2008, 02:11 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 2,265
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

In article ,
wrote:

On Thu, 21 Feb 2008 13:03:42 -0800 (PST), z
wrote:

On Feb 6, 7:58*pm, KC wrote:
On Feb 4, 12:27*pm, Sarah Still wrote:

I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?

I've read that rabbits only digest 25% of the food they eat, the
remaining 75% cycles through their system as unused plant fiber.
That's why rabbits are often seen eating their dried poop - it still
has lots of nourishment. *That said, there should not be much
difference between it and plant mulch.

KC


that's one of the oddities of the animal world. rabbits have a similar
digestive cycle as ruminants (cows, sheep, goats, deer, buffalo, etc);
bacteria in their stomach digest the plant matter and that generates
more food value. but whereas the ruminants have an extra stomach to do
the work, then they "chew the cud", wherefrom they get their name,
rabbits don't have that; so they have to poop it out then eat it a
second time. i gather that the first pass and second pass are
different enough for the bunnies to know which to eat.


There seems to be a lot of misconception about rabbits 'eating their
own poop'. They don't just eat any old poop.
Coprophagy, as the practice is known, involves only one type of feces.
It's one consumed mainly at night, therefore, 'night feces'. Compared
with the hard, dry pellets of 'day feces', these night feces are soft
and are contained in a mucous membrane. The rabbit normally ingests
these 'night feces' directly from the anus.
It's all part of the rabbit's method of B vitamin synthesis.

Ross.


Some people were ready to eat dinner. You know?
--

Billy

Bush, Cheney & Pelosi, Behind Bars
http://rachelcorriefoundation.org/site/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Movemen...George_W._Bush

  #9  
Old 29-02-2008, 04:26 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 268
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

Billy wrote:
In article ,
wrote:


On Thu, 21 Feb 2008 13:03:42 -0800 (PST), z
wrote:


On Feb 6, 7:58 pm, KC wrote:

On Feb 4, 12:27 pm, Sarah Still wrote:


I have a large cage of 12 rabbits, who spend a good deal of time
pooping. The dirty soil and hay mixture needs to be turned out every
once in a while, and I wondered if this manure/soil/hay mixture could
be used as an enriching compost for my herb garden. Would the pH of
the manure, diluted with potting soil, be suitable for herbs?

I've read that rabbits only digest 25% of the food they eat, the
remaining 75% cycles through their system as unused plant fiber.
That's why rabbits are often seen eating their dried poop - it still
has lots of nourishment. That said, there should not be much
difference between it and plant mulch.

KC

that's one of the oddities of the animal world. rabbits have a similar
digestive cycle as ruminants (cows, sheep, goats, deer, buffalo, etc);
bacteria in their stomach digest the plant matter and that generates
more food value. but whereas the ruminants have an extra stomach to do
the work, then they "chew the cud", wherefrom they get their name,
rabbits don't have that; so they have to poop it out then eat it a
second time. i gather that the first pass and second pass are
different enough for the bunnies to know which to eat.


There seems to be a lot of misconception about rabbits 'eating their
own poop'. They don't just eat any old poop.
Coprophagy, as the practice is known, involves only one type of feces.
It's one consumed mainly at night, therefore, 'night feces'. Compared
with the hard, dry pellets of 'day feces', these night feces are soft
and are contained in a mucous membrane. The rabbit normally ingests
these 'night feces' directly from the anus.
It's all part of the rabbit's method of B vitamin synthesis.

Ross.



Some people were ready to eat dinner. You know?


I hope you're limber enough.
  #10  
Old 29-02-2008, 09:29 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
z
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 205
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

On Feb 21, 8:11*pm, Billy wrote:

There seems to be a lot of misconception about rabbits 'eating their
own poop'. They don't just eat any old poop.
Coprophagy, as the practice is known, involves only one type of feces.
It's one consumed mainly at night, therefore, 'night feces'. Compared
with the hard, dry pellets of 'day feces', these night feces are soft
and are contained in a mucous membrane. The rabbit normally ingests
these 'night feces' directly from the anus.
It's all part of the rabbit's method of B vitamin synthesis.


Ross.


Some people were ready to eat dinner. You know?


well, this all raises the question, for folks who believe the Lord
created each animal just exactly as He wanted them to be and that's
the way they exist to this day, what the heck did He have against the
poor bunnies?
  #11  
Old 01-03-2008, 05:55 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 268
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

z wrote:
On Feb 21, 8:11 pm, Billy wrote:


There seems to be a lot of misconception about rabbits 'eating their
own poop'. They don't just eat any old poop.
Coprophagy, as the practice is known, involves only one type of feces.
It's one consumed mainly at night, therefore, 'night feces'. Compared
with the hard, dry pellets of 'day feces', these night feces are soft
and are contained in a mucous membrane. The rabbit normally ingests
these 'night feces' directly from the anus.
It's all part of the rabbit's method of B vitamin synthesis.


Ross.


Some people were ready to eat dinner. You know?



well, this all raises the question, for folks who believe the Lord
created each animal just exactly as He wanted them to be and that's
the way they exist to this day, what the heck did He have against the
poor bunnies?


I don't know, but "eat shit and die" comes to mind.
  #12  
Old 03-03-2008, 07:44 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
z
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 205
Default Using pet rabbit manure as compost

On Mar 1, 11:55*am, doofy wrote:
z wrote:
On Feb 21, 8:11 pm, Billy wrote:


There seems to be a lot of misconception about rabbits 'eating their
own poop'. They don't just eat any old poop.
Coprophagy, as the practice is known, involves only one type of feces.
It's one consumed mainly at night, therefore, 'night feces'. Compared
with the hard, dry pellets of 'day feces', these night feces are soft
and are contained in a mucous membrane. The rabbit normally ingests
these 'night feces' directly from the anus.
It's all part of the rabbit's method of B vitamin synthesis.


Ross.


Some people were ready to eat dinner. You know?


well, this all raises the question, for folks who believe the Lord
created each animal just exactly as He wanted them to be and that's
the way they exist to this day, what the heck did He have against the
poor bunnies?


I don't know, but "eat shit and die" comes to mind.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


certainly answers the question of "eh, what's up doc?"
 




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