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swiss chard



 
 
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  #16  
Old 15-04-2012, 07:04 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 82
Default swiss chard

"Derald" wrote in message
m...
songbird wrote:

i wouldn't bother if you don't like beets.

Oh, no, no: We likes the beet roots; just not the leaves. Years
ago, DW&I were enjoying some kind of red-veined chard that we were
buying from one of those "natural" food grocers. Having never grown
chard, I just arbitrarily picked something pretty from the seed catalog.
Shoot, prettiness is as good a criterion as any for the first time, eh?
I'll try something different this fall. If anyone has suggestions (about
chard, y'all), I'm all eyes.


Can you get 'Fordhook Giant' in the US? This is the variety of silver beet
(chard) I've grown for decades.


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  #17  
Old 15-04-2012, 04:31 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1,645
Default swiss chard

Farm1 wrote:
songbird wrote:


when it comes to matters of taste
things are quite subjective. in one of the
other groups (preserving) there is someone who
hates beets and calls them dirt chunks.


Hmmpf! Obviously the person who thinks that must be a seriously bad cook if
that is how they taste to them. I'd stop reading any hints or tips from
them.


oh dear! i think they are a fine cook as they
win many awards. they simply do not like beets.
and i've never noted the person saying things
about cooking that would make me suspect they
don't know what they are doing.


songbird
  #18  
Old 15-04-2012, 04:34 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1,645
Default swiss chard

Farm1 wrote:
....
Can you get 'Fordhook Giant' in the US? This is the variety of silver beet
(chard) I've grown for decades.


yes, at least i just saw it in the display the
other day and it was from Burpee so it should be
available a fair number of other places too.

does it get red stems? the kind i used to eat
regularly had very bright red stems and veins.


songbird
  #19  
Old 15-04-2012, 04:38 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1,645
Default swiss chard

Derald wrote:
songbird wrote:

i wouldn't bother if you don't like beets.


Oh, no, no: We likes the beet roots; just not the leaves. Years
ago, DW&I were enjoying some kind of red-veined chard that we were
buying from one of those "natural" food grocers. Having never grown
chard, I just arbitrarily picked something pretty from the seed catalog.
Shoot, prettiness is as good a criterion as any for the first time, eh?


worked for me too with the "neon mix".


I'll try something different this fall. If anyone has suggestions (about
chard, y'all), I'm all eyes.


there were four different seed packs to pick from
the display and i didn't have enough loot to get all
of them. so i picked the package with four varieties
in it.


songbird
  #20  
Old 15-04-2012, 05:38 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1,645
Default swiss chard

Farm1 wrote:
....
IIRC, the ubellifera family are the best bug hosts. I'd not heard of
lucerne (alfalfa) being a bug haven.


i'm finding lichens and tropical plants
for that family. not sure what plants you
might really be meaning here. latin or
taxonomy have never been my strong points.


songbird
  #21  
Old 15-04-2012, 06:31 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 105
Default swiss chard

In article ,
songbird wrote:

they simply do not like beets.


Tastes do vary. Some of them are genetic variations (in people) and
others are just preference.

In the former category, cilantro, or as I call it, moldy-sock-plant,
which restaurants have become frond of tossing in things where they
don't mention it on the menu. AKA Mexican parsley and fresh coriander. I
can taste the revolting crap in dishes where people that like the stuff
can't. I can think of no method of preparing a substance that tastes
like mouldy socks that would in any way appeal to me. Well, perhaps
gathering 100% of the worldwide genetic stock someplace and roasting at
5000 degrees for 16 hours would do it. ;-)

In the "probably latter but I don't know" the entire brassica family.
Saurkraut is the only thing from there I can stand, and I suspect it's
because the notorious stink of krauting is the removal of an obnoxious
sulfur compound I cannot stand, otherwise typical of the family.

--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by
Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.
  #22  
Old 15-04-2012, 07:07 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1,645
Default swiss chard

songbird wrote:
....
there were four different seed packs to pick from
the display and i didn't have enough loot to get all
of them. so i picked the package with four varieties
in it.


looking at the website for burpee they don't have
the same exact "neon lights" mix i picked up the other
day, instead they have one with five colors (including
white). alas, they do not list the individual variety
names.


songbird
  #23  
Old 16-04-2012, 02:00 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 2,944
Default swiss chard

songbird wrote:
Farm1 wrote:
...
Can you get 'Fordhook Giant' in the US? This is the variety of
silver beet (chard) I've grown for decades.


yes, at least i just saw it in the display the
other day and it was from Burpee so it should be
available a fair number of other places too.

does it get red stems?


no

the kind i used to eat
regularly had very bright red stems and veins.


songbird


D
  #24  
Old 16-04-2012, 02:04 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 2,944
Default swiss chard

songbird wrote:
Farm1 wrote:
songbird wrote:


when it comes to matters of taste
things are quite subjective. in one of the
other groups (preserving) there is someone who
hates beets and calls them dirt chunks.


Hmmpf! Obviously the person who thinks that must be a seriously bad
cook if that is how they taste to them. I'd stop reading any hints
or tips from them.


oh dear! i think they are a fine cook as they
win many awards. they simply do not like beets.
and i've never noted the person saying things
about cooking that would make me suspect they
don't know what they are doing.


songbird


Maybe it wasn't the preparation. Silverbeet can get very strong and
metallic in flavour if it is too old, typically such leaves are dark
coloured and thick. You need to keep the leaves coming so you can cut them
at a good size but young.

D


  #25  
Old 16-04-2012, 02:13 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 82
Default swiss chard

"songbird" wrote in message
...
Farm1 wrote:
songbird wrote:


when it comes to matters of taste
things are quite subjective. in one of the
other groups (preserving) there is someone who
hates beets and calls them dirt chunks.


Hmmpf! Obviously the person who thinks that must be a seriously bad cook
if
that is how they taste to them. I'd stop reading any hints or tips from
them.


oh dear! i think they are a fine cook as they
win many awards. they simply do not like beets.
and i've never noted the person saying things
about cooking that would make me suspect they
don't know what they are doing.


"Dirt chunks" should have been a dead giveaway.


  #26  
Old 16-04-2012, 02:14 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 82
Default swiss chard

"songbird" wrote in message
...
Farm1 wrote:
...
Can you get 'Fordhook Giant' in the US? This is the variety of silver
beet
(chard) I've grown for decades.


yes, at least i just saw it in the display the
other day and it was from Burpee so it should be
available a fair number of other places too.

does it get red stems?


No. White stems - prolly contibutes to why we call it 'silver' beet.


  #27  
Old 16-04-2012, 02:17 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 82
Default swiss chard

"songbird" wrote in message
...
Farm1 wrote:
...
IIRC, the ubellifera family are the best bug hosts. I'd not heard of
lucerne (alfalfa) being a bug haven.


i'm finding lichens and tropical plants
for that family. not sure what plants you
might really be meaning here. latin or
taxonomy have never been my strong points.


I left out an 'm'. It's 'umbellifera'. Think 'carrot' family - carrot,
parsnip, Queen Anne's lace etc.


  #28  
Old 16-04-2012, 02:29 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 105
Default swiss chard

In article
,
Billy wrote:

You should try cilantro pesto, when the cilantro is in flower. Yummy!


No, I shouldn't. Find a damp basement with a washing machine in it, dig
around behind the washing machine until you find a lost, moldering sock,
make pesto with it, and you'll have an idea of what I would taste...

This is not a matter of "how it's prepared", this is a matter of
"cilantro tastes (to me, and a bunch of other people with the same
genetic 'switch' thrown) the way moldy socks smell" - so pesto would be
a waste of perfectly good nuts, oil, garlic cheese and lemon (or
whatever you put in _your_ pesto other than leaves). I have basil and
sorrel and nasturtiums that will make a pesto that does _not_ taste like
moldy socks smell.

Other sources liken the taste to the smell of bedbugs, which I've so far
avoided having the delightful-I'm-sure experience of smelling in person.

--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by
Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.
  #29  
Old 16-04-2012, 05:16 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 2,944
Default swiss chard

Farm1 wrote:
"songbird" wrote in message
...
Farm1 wrote:
...
Can you get 'Fordhook Giant' in the US? This is the variety of
silver beet
(chard) I've grown for decades.


yes, at least i just saw it in the display the
other day and it was from Burpee so it should be
available a fair number of other places too.

does it get red stems?


No. White stems - prolly contibutes to why we call it 'silver' beet.


I thought 'silver' came from the way water beads on the leaves.

D
  #30  
Old 16-04-2012, 06:30 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 82
Default swiss chard

"David Hare-Scott" wrote in message
...
Farm1 wrote:
"songbird" wrote in message
...
Farm1 wrote:
...
Can you get 'Fordhook Giant' in the US? This is the variety of
silver beet
(chard) I've grown for decades.

yes, at least i just saw it in the display the
other day and it was from Burpee so it should be
available a fair number of other places too.

does it get red stems?


No. White stems - prolly contibutes to why we call it 'silver' beet.


I thought 'silver' came from the way water beads on the leaves.


Who knows how it got it's name int he real world. But I have noticed that
the stems do have a silvery/pearly look to them.


 




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