A Gardening forum. GardenBanter.co.uk

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » GardenBanter.co.uk forum » Gardening Discussions » Edible Gardening
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Hanging gardens vs rabbits



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-03-2017, 05:26 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Hanging gardens vs rabbits

Hi folks,

I apologize in advance if this seems like a silly question.

My wife and I are thinking of setting up a hanging herb garden in our
back yard this year, but neither of us has experience in doing so.

We have a rather large rabbit population in our area, and so we'd like to
make the garden as "rabbit-proof" as possible. Any recommendations
(minumum height, etc) on how we might go about this?

TIA

-Shaun




Ads
  #2  
Old 05-03-2017, 09:00 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 676
Default Hanging gardens vs rabbits

On 3/5/2017 11:26 AM, Turnipgod wrote:
Hi folks,

I apologize in advance if this seems like a silly question.

My wife and I are thinking of setting up a hanging herb garden in our
back yard this year, but neither of us has experience in doing so.

We have a rather large rabbit population in our area, and so we'd like to
make the garden as "rabbit-proof" as possible. Any recommendations
(minumum height, etc) on how we might go about this?

TIA

-Shaun





Rabbits can't fly nor climb so a hanging garden or just one that is
raised at least four feet high should do the job. Cotton tails or jacks?
Jack rabbits can jump pretty high, cottontails not so much. Cottontail
rabbits are very tasty, jackrabbits can be a bit tough so make a stew. A
high powered pellet gun or a .22 rifle with shorts should take care of them.

Many years ago we had a commercial rabbitry and showed them at fairs,
etc. plus we ate a lot, sold the hides, and rabbit poop can be put
straight onto a garden as it does not "burn." If other folks crave
rabbit meat you can get some good money for them.

Wild rabbits can easily dig under a wire fence but if you bury another
foot of fence in the dirt they usually won't dig that deep. At any rate,
rabbits are good to eat, make good fertilizer, and the hides are easy to
sell.

George
  #3  
Old 06-03-2017, 02:01 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Hanging gardens vs rabbits

On Sun, 05 Mar 2017 15:00:17 -0600, George Shirley wrote:

On 3/5/2017 11:26 AM, Turnipgod wrote:
Hi folks,

I apologize in advance if this seems like a silly question.

My wife and I are thinking of setting up a hanging herb garden in our
back yard this year, but neither of us has experience in doing so.

We have a rather large rabbit population in our area, and so we'd like
to make the garden as "rabbit-proof" as possible. Any recommendations
(minumum height, etc) on how we might go about this?

TIA

-Shaun





Rabbits can't fly nor climb so a hanging garden or just one that is
raised at least four feet high should do the job. Cotton tails or jacks?
Jack rabbits can jump pretty high, cottontails not so much. Cottontail
rabbits are very tasty, jackrabbits can be a bit tough so make a stew. A
high powered pellet gun or a .22 rifle with shorts should take care of
them.


Thanks mate, we'll plan on 3-4 feet, just to be safe. No dice on the
guns (or traps for that matter)... city bylaws and all that.

Many years ago we had a commercial rabbitry and showed them at fairs,
etc. plus we ate a lot, sold the hides, and rabbit poop can be put
straight onto a garden as it does not "burn." If other folks crave
rabbit meat you can get some good money for them.


I've never tried rabbit, although I'm certainly not adverse.

Wild rabbits can easily dig under a wire fence but if you bury another
foot of fence in the dirt they usually won't dig that deep. At any rate,
rabbits are good to eat, make good fertilizer, and the hides are easy to
sell.


Well, there's no shortage of rabbit... fertilizer... in our yard.
Perhaps when it comes time, our little one can earn a bit of allowance
money

-Shaun
  #4  
Old 06-03-2017, 12:40 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 676
Default Hanging gardens vs rabbits

On 3/5/2017 8:01 PM, Turnipgod wrote:
On Sun, 05 Mar 2017 15:00:17 -0600, George Shirley wrote:

On 3/5/2017 11:26 AM, Turnipgod wrote:
Hi folks,

I apologize in advance if this seems like a silly question.

My wife and I are thinking of setting up a hanging herb garden in our
back yard this year, but neither of us has experience in doing so.

We have a rather large rabbit population in our area, and so we'd like
to make the garden as "rabbit-proof" as possible. Any recommendations
(minumum height, etc) on how we might go about this?

TIA

-Shaun





Rabbits can't fly nor climb so a hanging garden or just one that is
raised at least four feet high should do the job. Cotton tails or jacks?
Jack rabbits can jump pretty high, cottontails not so much. Cottontail
rabbits are very tasty, jackrabbits can be a bit tough so make a stew. A
high powered pellet gun or a .22 rifle with shorts should take care of
them.


Thanks mate, we'll plan on 3-4 feet, just to be safe. No dice on the
guns (or traps for that matter)... city bylaws and all that.

Many years ago we had a commercial rabbitry and showed them at fairs,
etc. plus we ate a lot, sold the hides, and rabbit poop can be put
straight onto a garden as it does not "burn." If other folks crave
rabbit meat you can get some good money for them.


I've never tried rabbit, although I'm certainly not adverse.

Wild rabbits can easily dig under a wire fence but if you bury another
foot of fence in the dirt they usually won't dig that deep. At any rate,
rabbits are good to eat, make good fertilizer, and the hides are easy to
sell.


Well, there's no shortage of rabbit... fertilizer... in our yard.
Perhaps when it comes time, our little one can earn a bit of allowance
money

-Shaun

I started with rabbits about age 5 in the last years of WWII. Meat of
any kind was hard to come by so I was raising domestic rabbits in cages
in the backyard. We married in 1960 and built a home on a half acre my
parents gave each of us kids.Wife and I ran a commercial rabbitry for
about 12 years. Lots of good meat, sold the hides, sold a lot of the
meat, and had a wonderful garden with rabbit droppings.

To bad you can't run a trio for home meat and good fertilizer but you
still can use the droppings. Good luck Shaun.
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright 2004-2017 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.