A Gardening forum. GardenBanter.co.uk

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » GardenBanter.co.uk forum » Gardening Discussions » Edible Gardening
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Peat Moss Substitute? - Shredding leaves



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-07-2004, 08:04 AM
Glenna Rose
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Peat Moss Substitute? - Shredding leaves

writes:

The leaves should be great and even better if you can shread them before
composting.

John


Recently I purchased a Black & Decker electric blower/vacuum/mulcher which
I saw advertised on one of those infomercials. I had a blower/vacuum
attachment for my Ryobi already but it only vacuumed, not mulched.
Because I have a huge evergreen magnolia that drops dead leaves
continuously all year, I've needed to do something. I have cleaned up
literally wheelbarrows full of leaves all year. (Think October all year
long!) They are so diligent about falling that I cannot even mow a single
strip without more leaves being on what I just mowed before I turn to go
back up the next strip.

I bought it on the 4th and have already shredded several wheelbarrows full
(shredded/mulched volume). As far as I'm concerned, this is the only way
to go with leaves and wish I'd done it in 1999 when I bought this house; I
might actually have lawn under the tree if I had. The lawnmower just
cannot keep up with them and the bag needs to be emptied every couple of
sweeps, if it even makes it two.

A neighbor up the street has a huge oak tree. I understand that oak
leaves are excellent for the garden (they sure added to the horse manure I
got for three years) and have wanted to get some from them. Now, this
fall, I can realistically get them . . . and will ask. They will likely
gleefully had me the end of the electric cord.g

My recommendation for the leaves is to definitely mulch/shred them if you
have a way of doing it. You can put them directly on your plants (without
them blowing away if they are dry) as mulch or in the compost.

This has worked so well, I'm seriously considering using it for the straw
in the chicken house; it will work into the soil more quickly, surely,
though the straw may be too long. One thing for sure, not tried, not
known. :-)

Good luck with your project.

Glenna






Ads
  #2  
Old 14-07-2004, 02:02 PM
KK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Peat Moss Substitute? - Shredding leaves


"Glenna Rose" wrote in message
news:fc.003d094101cc966e3b9aca00eb737980.1cc9696@p mug.org...
writes:

The leaves should be great and even better if you can shread them before
composting.

John


Recently I purchased a Black & Decker electric blower/vacuum/mulcher which
I saw advertised on one of those infomercials. I had a blower/vacuum
attachment for my Ryobi already but it only vacuumed, not mulched.
Because I have a huge evergreen magnolia that drops dead leaves
continuously all year, I've needed to do something. I have cleaned up
literally wheelbarrows full of leaves all year. (Think October all year
long!) They are so diligent about falling that I cannot even mow a single
strip without more leaves being on what I just mowed before I turn to go
back up the next strip.

I bought it on the 4th and have already shredded several wheelbarrows full
(shredded/mulched volume). As far as I'm concerned, this is the only way
to go with leaves and wish I'd done it in 1999 when I bought this house; I
might actually have lawn under the tree if I had. The lawnmower just
cannot keep up with them and the bag needs to be emptied every couple of
sweeps, if it even makes it two.

A neighbor up the street has a huge oak tree. I understand that oak
leaves are excellent for the garden (they sure added to the horse manure I
got for three years) and have wanted to get some from them. Now, this
fall, I can realistically get them . . . and will ask. They will likely
gleefully had me the end of the electric cord.g

My recommendation for the leaves is to definitely mulch/shred them if you
have a way of doing it. You can put them directly on your plants (without
them blowing away if they are dry) as mulch or in the compost.

This has worked so well, I'm seriously considering using it for the straw
in the chicken house; it will work into the soil more quickly, surely,
though the straw may be too long. One thing for sure, not tried, not
known. :-)

Good luck with your project.

Glenna

I think the shredder/mulcher is a good idea. I can get a very large amount
of leaves each fall and shredded they should be very easy to handle and
apply to my garden. Did I read somewhere that leaves change the ph of the
soil? I'm wondering if adding lime with the shredded leaves is necessary???

Thanks again for the advise.


  #3  
Old 18-07-2004, 09:02 AM
KK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Peat Moss Substitute? - Shredding leaves


"Glenna Rose" wrote in message
news:fc.003d094101cc966e3b9aca00eb737980.1cc9696@p mug.org...
writes:

The leaves should be great and even better if you can shread them before
composting.

John


Recently I purchased a Black & Decker electric blower/vacuum/mulcher which
I saw advertised on one of those infomercials. I had a blower/vacuum
attachment for my Ryobi already but it only vacuumed, not mulched.
Because I have a huge evergreen magnolia that drops dead leaves
continuously all year, I've needed to do something. I have cleaned up
literally wheelbarrows full of leaves all year. (Think October all year
long!) They are so diligent about falling that I cannot even mow a single
strip without more leaves being on what I just mowed before I turn to go
back up the next strip.

I bought it on the 4th and have already shredded several wheelbarrows full
(shredded/mulched volume). As far as I'm concerned, this is the only way
to go with leaves and wish I'd done it in 1999 when I bought this house; I
might actually have lawn under the tree if I had. The lawnmower just
cannot keep up with them and the bag needs to be emptied every couple of
sweeps, if it even makes it two.

A neighbor up the street has a huge oak tree. I understand that oak
leaves are excellent for the garden (they sure added to the horse manure I
got for three years) and have wanted to get some from them. Now, this
fall, I can realistically get them . . . and will ask. They will likely
gleefully had me the end of the electric cord.g

My recommendation for the leaves is to definitely mulch/shred them if you
have a way of doing it. You can put them directly on your plants (without
them blowing away if they are dry) as mulch or in the compost.

This has worked so well, I'm seriously considering using it for the straw
in the chicken house; it will work into the soil more quickly, surely,
though the straw may be too long. One thing for sure, not tried, not
known. :-)

Good luck with your project.

Glenna

I think the shredder/mulcher is a good idea. I can get a very large amount
of leaves each fall and shredded they should be very easy to handle and
apply to my garden. Did I read somewhere that leaves change the ph of the
soil? I'm wondering if adding lime with the shredded leaves is necessary???

Thanks again for the advise.


  #4  
Old 19-07-2004, 12:02 AM
simy1
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Peat Moss Substitute? - Shredding leaves

"KK" wrote in message ...

I think the shredder/mulcher is a good idea. I can get a very large amount
of leaves each fall and shredded they should be very easy to handle and
apply to my garden. Did I read somewhere that leaves change the ph of the
soil? I'm wondering if adding lime with the shredded leaves is necessary???

Thanks again for the advise.


au contraire, in most cases leaves make a nearly neutral compost, and
they mellow acidic soils. That's why many, including me, use it to
start seedlings.
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Culinary herbFAQ part 3/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 31-03-2003 01:56 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 2/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 31-03-2003 01:56 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 1/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 31-03-2003 01:56 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 2/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 28-02-2003 06:27 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 1/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 28-02-2003 06:27 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright 2004-2014 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.