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How to prune a lemon tree?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 08-05-2006, 04:10 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default How to prune a lemon tree?

Hello all,

I have a lemon tree that really could use some trimming back. I've
scoured the interweb and cannot seem to find out how I should go about
this, I hear that if not pruned properly that I may not see any fruit
for a couple of years.

The tree is about 15' high.

Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 08-05-2006, 04:16 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default How to prune a lemon tree?

On Sun, 07 May 2006 20:10:33 -0700, Wil Schultz
wrote:

Hello all,

I have a lemon tree that really could use some trimming back. I've
scoured the interweb and cannot seem to find out how I should go about
this, I hear that if not pruned properly that I may not see any fruit
for a couple of years.

The tree is about 15' high.

Thanks in advance!



In the orchards here they just top them, they use a machine that looks
somewhat like a big lawnmower and cut anything off that is above about
6 to 8 ft. One consideration, don't do it too soon. the new growth
at the top of the tree gives some frost protection, after frost is
gone then cut at will.


Sunset Western Gardens book says for citrus, prune anyway, anytime.
Of course not below the graft, but otherwise...

  #3  
Old 08-05-2006, 08:40 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default How to prune a lemon tree?

all the answers you need

http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu/general-pruning.shtml

http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu/links.shtml#care

Ten Basics of When and How to Prune Fruit Trees

1.. Prune fruit trees when the leaves are off (dormant). It's easier to
see what you are doing and removal of dormant buds (growing points)
invigorates the remaining buds. Summer pruning removes leaves (food
manufacture), will slow fruit ripening, and exposes fruit to sunburn. Summer
pruning can be beneficial, however, when used to slow down overly vigorous
trees or trees that are too large. It is usually done just after harvest.
2.. Right after planting a new tree, cut if off to short stick 24 to 30
inches high and cut any side shoots, remaining below that, to one bud. This
encourages low branching and equalizes the top and root system. Paint the
tree with white latex paint to protect it from sunburn and borer attack
3.. Young trees should be pruned fairly heavily and encouraged to grow
rapidly for the first 3 years without any fruit. Leave most of the small
horizontal branches untouched for later fruiting.
4.. When deciding which branch to cut and where to cut it, remember that
topping a vertical branch encourages vegetative growth necessary for
development of the tree and opens the tree to more sunlight. Topping
horizontal branches is done to renew fruiting wood and to thin off excessive
fruit. Horizontal branches left uncut will bear earlier and heavier crops.
5.. Upright branches generally remain vegetative and vigorous. Horizontal
branches generally are more fruitful. A good combination of the two is
necessary, for fruiting now and in future years. Remove suckers, water
sprouts and most competing branches growing straight up into the tree.
Downward bending branches eventually lose vigor and produce only a few small
fruit; cut off the part hanging down.
6.. New growth occurs right where you make the cut; that is the influence
of the cut only affects the buds within 1 to 8 inches of the cut surface not
3 to 4 feet down into the tree. The more buds cut off the more vigorous the
new shoots will be.
7.. Do most of the pruning in the top of the tree so that the lower
branches are exposed to sunlight. Sun exposed wood remains fruitful and
produces the largest fruit. Shaded branches eventually stop fruiting and
will never produce without drastic topping and renewal of the entire tree.
8.. Make clean cuts (within 1/4") of bud; don't leave stubs.
9.. Use spreaders or tie downs to get 45 angles branches of upright
vigorous growing trees.
10.. Peach and Nectarine remove 50% of last years growth. Fig, Apple,
Pear, Plum and Apricot remove about 20% of last years growth. Cherries only
summer prune the first 5 years.
Pruning Abandoned or Neglected Fruit Trees
Whether today's trees are remnants from yesterday's orchards, or simply
abandoned for other reasons, pruning may look like an impossible task. In
some cases, these trees can be rejuvenated and made functional in the home
orchard or landscape. In others, planting a new tree may be more practical.

"Wil Schultz" wrote in message
...
Hello all,

I have a lemon tree that really could use some trimming back. I've scoured
the interweb and cannot seem to find out how I should go about this, I
hear that if not pruned properly that I may not see any fruit for a couple
of years.

The tree is about 15' high.

Thanks in advance!



  #4  
Old 08-05-2006, 09:47 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: n/a
Default How to prune a lemon tree?


"Charles" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 07 May 2006 20:10:33 -0700, Wil Schultz
wrote:

Hello all,

I have a lemon tree that really could use some trimming back. I've
scoured the interweb and cannot seem to find out how I should go about
this, I hear that if not pruned properly that I may not see any fruit
for a couple of years.

The tree is about 15' high.

Thanks in advance!



In the orchards here they just top them, they use a machine that looks
somewhat like a big lawnmower and cut anything off that is above about
6 to 8 ft. One consideration, don't do it too soon. the new growth
at the top of the tree gives some frost protection, after frost is
gone then cut at will.



This may be how they are done in bulk where costs are a major consideration
but better results will be obtained by a more selective approach. There are
plenty of detailed references about but it comes down to something like
this:

At the right time of year and using the appropriate cutting technique:

1) remove any dead or decayed wood
2) remove clutter and admit light by thinning out
3) compact by shortening branches that are too tall or overly long and weak

David


  #5  
Old 09-05-2006, 03:29 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default How to prune a lemon tree?

Nicole does not know anything about citrus.

Nicole wrote [in part]:

1.. Prune fruit trees when the leaves are off (dormant). It's easier to
see what you are doing and removal of dormant buds (growing points)
invigorates the remaining buds. Summer pruning removes leaves (food
manufacture), will slow fruit ripening, and exposes fruit to sunburn. Summer
pruning can be beneficial, however, when used to slow down overly vigorous
trees or trees that are too large. It is usually done just after harvest.


The question was about a lemon tree. Citrus is evergreen.


2.. Right after planting a new tree, cut if off to short stick 24 to 30
inches high and cut any side shoots, remaining below that, to one bud. This
encourages low branching and equalizes the top and root system. Paint the
tree with white latex paint to protect it from sunburn and borer attack


That's a good way to kill any citrus. Never cut back a lemon to the
point where there is no foliage.


3.. Young trees should be pruned fairly heavily and encouraged to grow
rapidly for the first 3 years without any fruit. Leave most of the small
horizontal branches untouched for later fruiting.


Citrus never needs pruning for fruit production. An unpruned lemon or
orange will produce very well. Citrus is pruned to remove dead wood and
-- in a garden -- to improve appearance. Where snails and ants are a
severe problem, citrus is sometimes pruned to eliminate any growth
(other than the trunk) that touches the ground. Commercial orchards are
pruned to make it easier to harvest (by removing growth that would
require too tall a ladder).


4.. When deciding which branch to cut and where to cut it, remember that
topping a vertical branch encourages vegetative growth necessary for
development of the tree and opens the tree to more sunlight. Topping
horizontal branches is done to renew fruiting wood and to thin off excessive
fruit. Horizontal branches left uncut will bear earlier and heavier crops.


As I indicated above, citrus does NOT need pruning for renewal.


5.. Upright branches generally remain vegetative and vigorous. Horizontal
branches generally are more fruitful. A good combination of the two is
necessary, for fruiting now and in future years. Remove suckers, water
sprouts and most competing branches growing straight up into the tree.
Downward bending branches eventually lose vigor and produce only a few small
fruit; cut off the part hanging down.


For citrus, ALL branches are equally productive.


NOTE: For dwarf citrus grown in containers, it is sometimes necessary
to prune in order to keep the foliage from exceeding the ability of
constrained roots to supply moisture. Prune more than two months before
the first frost and not before the last frost.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
Sunset Zone: 21 -- interior Santa Monica Mountains with some ocean
influence (USDA 10a, very close to Sunset Zone 19)
Gardening pages at http://www.rossde.com/garden/
  #6  
Old 09-05-2006, 07:29 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default How to prune a lemon tree?

David,
I copied this from a University website... just like I stated. What makes
you more knowledgeable than UC Davis?

Unlike you, I don't have to talk out of my ass.
Contact a cooperative extension that has extensive knowledge with citrus and
argue with them. Stop trying to give HORRIBLE advice to novices.
Dumb ass
Nicole
"David E. Ross" wrote in message
...
Nicole does not know anything about citrus.

Nicole wrote [in part]:

1.. Prune fruit trees when the leaves are off (dormant). It's easier to
see what you are doing and removal of dormant buds (growing points)
invigorates the remaining buds. Summer pruning removes leaves (food
manufacture), will slow fruit ripening, and exposes fruit to sunburn.
Summer pruning can be beneficial, however, when used to slow down overly
vigorous trees or trees that are too large. It is usually done just after
harvest.


The question was about a lemon tree. Citrus is evergreen.


2.. Right after planting a new tree, cut if off to short stick 24 to 30
inches high and cut any side shoots, remaining below that, to one bud.
This encourages low branching and equalizes the top and root system.
Paint the tree with white latex paint to protect it from sunburn and
borer attack


That's a good way to kill any citrus. Never cut back a lemon to the point
where there is no foliage.


3.. Young trees should be pruned fairly heavily and encouraged to grow
rapidly for the first 3 years without any fruit. Leave most of the small
horizontal branches untouched for later fruiting.


Citrus never needs pruning for fruit production. An unpruned lemon or
orange will produce very well. Citrus is pruned to remove dead wood
and -- in a garden -- to improve appearance. Where snails and ants are a
severe problem, citrus is sometimes pruned to eliminate any growth (other
than the trunk) that touches the ground. Commercial orchards are pruned
to make it easier to harvest (by removing growth that would require too
tall a ladder).


4.. When deciding which branch to cut and where to cut it, remember
that topping a vertical branch encourages vegetative growth necessary for
development of the tree and opens the tree to more sunlight. Topping
horizontal branches is done to renew fruiting wood and to thin off
excessive fruit. Horizontal branches left uncut will bear earlier and
heavier crops.


As I indicated above, citrus does NOT need pruning for renewal.


5.. Upright branches generally remain vegetative and vigorous.
Horizontal branches generally are more fruitful. A good combination of
the two is necessary, for fruiting now and in future years. Remove
suckers, water sprouts and most competing branches growing straight up
into the tree. Downward bending branches eventually lose vigor and
produce only a few small fruit; cut off the part hanging down.


For citrus, ALL branches are equally productive.


NOTE: For dwarf citrus grown in containers, it is sometimes necessary to
prune in order to keep the foliage from exceeding the ability of
constrained roots to supply moisture. Prune more than two months before
the first frost and not before the last frost.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
Sunset Zone: 21 -- interior Santa Monica Mountains with some ocean
influence (USDA 10a, very close to Sunset Zone 19)
Gardening pages at http://www.rossde.com/garden/



  #7  
Old 09-05-2006, 07:34 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: n/a
Default How to prune a lemon tree?

Can you read??? From your response, it sure doesn't look like it. When was
the last time you even saw a citrus orchard?
Argumentative, wannabe know it all.

Nicole in the San Joaquin Valley


  #8  
Old 10-05-2006, 04:28 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: n/a
Default How to prune a lemon tree?

Nicole wrote:
David,
I copied this from a University website... just like I stated. What makes
you more knowledgeable than UC Davis?

Unlike you, I don't have to talk out of my ass.
Contact a cooperative extension that has extensive knowledge with citrus and
argue with them. Stop trying to give HORRIBLE advice to novices.
Dumb ass


You described pruning deciduous trees. Citrus are not deciduous.
Unless you provide the link to the UC Davis Web page, I will stand by my
comments.


Can you read??? From your response, it sure doesn't look like it. When was
the last time you even saw a citrus orchard?
Argumentative, wannabe know it all.

Nicole in the San Joaquin Valley


How much citrus grows in the San Joaquin Valley? I live in Ventura
County, where citrus grows extensively. I also have citrus growing in
my own garden. Do you?

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
Sunset Zone: 21 -- interior Santa Monica Mountains with some ocean
influence (USDA 10a, very close to Sunset Zone 19)
Gardening pages at http://www.rossde.com/garden/
 




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