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How to keep a pine tree alive



 
 
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  #1  
Old 28-05-2007, 07:34 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 3
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

Hi,

I have a fledgling pine in my yard that I got to close to with my weed-
eater. I accidentally ripped some of the bark off at the ground
level. This tree ~6' tall, perhaps 6' 6" (I say fledgling because I'm
pretty sure it's a ponderosa). What techniques can be used to ensure
the tree doesn't die. Where I live in Idaho, I don't have many trees
in my yard and I don't want to loose this one.

Thanks for any suggestions,
Andy

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  #2  
Old 29-05-2007, 12:40 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 281
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

In article .com,
Andrew Falanga wrote:

Hi,

I have a fledgling pine in my yard that I got to close to with my weed-
eater. I accidentally ripped some of the bark off at the ground
level. This tree ~6' tall, perhaps 6' 6" (I say fledgling because I'm
pretty sure it's a ponderosa). What techniques can be used to ensure
the tree doesn't die. Where I live in Idaho, I don't have many trees
in my yard and I don't want to loose this one.

Thanks for any suggestions,
Andy


The bark is no big deal but the next layer in is the living part of the
tree. Get some tree sealer, as you would for major pruning, and put on
damaged area.

- Bill
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
  #3  
Old 29-05-2007, 03:42 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 478
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

On 28 May 2007 11:34:30 -0700, Andrew Falanga wrote:
I have a fledgling pine in my yard that I got to close to with my weed-
eater. I accidentally ripped some of the bark off at the ground
level.


Ah, I know this as "lawnmower blight".

This tree ~6' tall, perhaps 6' 6" (I say fledgling because I'm
pretty sure it's a ponderosa). What techniques can be used to ensure
the tree doesn't die. Where I live in Idaho, I don't have many trees
in my yard and I don't want to loose this one.


Go take a good look at the damage... are you through the thin cambium
layer under the bark? If you're not through the cambium and it's a small
wound not involving much of a circumference of the tree, I'd leave it
alone. If it's very large or through the cambium, might be a job for
bridge grafts:
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/grafting.html
http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Ipm/homegrnd/htms/28graft.htm
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...cts/98-003.htm

In either case, get some mulch around that tree so you don't go
near it again with that weedwhacker, and make especially
sure it goes into the winter deeply watered.

Kay

  #4  
Old 29-05-2007, 05:12 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 281
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

In article ,
Kay Lancaster wrote:

On 28 May 2007 11:34:30 -0700, Andrew Falanga wrote:
I have a fledgling pine in my yard that I got to close to with my weed-
eater. I accidentally ripped some of the bark off at the ground
level.


Ah, I know this as "lawnmower blight".

This tree ~6' tall, perhaps 6' 6" (I say fledgling because I'm
pretty sure it's a ponderosa). What techniques can be used to ensure
the tree doesn't die. Where I live in Idaho, I don't have many trees
in my yard and I don't want to loose this one.


Go take a good look at the damage... are you through the thin cambium
layer under the bark? If you're not through the cambium and it's a small
wound not involving much of a circumference of the tree, I'd leave it
alone. If it's very large or through the cambium, might be a job for
bridge grafts:
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/grafting.html
http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Ipm/homegrnd/htms/28graft.htm
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...cts/98-003.htm

In either case, get some mulch around that tree so you don't go
near it again with that weedwhacker, and make especially
sure it goes into the winter deeply watered.

Kay


You heard the lady. Follow her suggestions and you might walk away
unscathed.

- Bill
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
  #5  
Old 29-05-2007, 10:47 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 34
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

On May 29, 12:40 am, Bill Rose wrote:
In article .com,
Andrew Falanga wrote:

Hi,


I have a fledgling pine in my yard that I got to close to with my weed-
eater. I accidentally ripped some of the bark off at the ground
level. This tree ~6' tall, perhaps 6' 6" (I say fledgling because I'm
pretty sure it's a ponderosa). What techniques can be used to ensure
the tree doesn't die. Where I live in Idaho, I don't have manytrees
in my yard and I don't want to loose this one.


Thanks for any suggestions,
Andy


The bark is no big deal but the next layer in is the living part of the
tree. Get some tree sealer, as you would for major pruning, and put on
damaged area.

- Bill
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)


Best not to seal it with anything. Sealants can invite more trouble
than help.
Do as Kay says.

  #6  
Old 03-06-2007, 01:09 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 3
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

On May 28, 8:42 pm, Kay Lancaster wrote:
On 28 May 2007 11:34:30 -0700, Andrew Falanga wrote:

I have a fledgling pine in my yard that I got to close to with my weed-
eater. I accidentally ripped some of the bark off at the ground
level.


Ah, I know this as "lawnmower blight".

This tree ~6' tall, perhaps 6' 6" (I say fledgling because I'm

pretty sure it's a ponderosa). What techniques can be used to ensure
the tree doesn't die. Where I live in Idaho, I don't have many trees
in my yard and I don't want to loose this one.


Go take a good look at the damage... are you through the thin cambium
layer under the bark? If you're not through the cambium and it's a small
wound not involving much of a circumference of the tree, I'd leave it
alone. If it's very large or through the cambium, might be a job for
bridge grafts:http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/h...cts/98-003.htm

In either case, get some mulch around that tree so you don't go
near it again with that weedwhacker, and make especially
sure it goes into the winter deeply watered.

Kay


Thanks to all for the suggestions. I wished I'd read this thread
before purchasing and applying the tree sealer. Oh well, we'll see
how it goes. Thanks again.

Andy

  #7  
Old 03-06-2007, 10:42 AM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 478
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

On Sun, 03 Jun 2007 00:09:34 -0000, Andrew Falanga wrote:
In either case, get some mulch around that tree so you don't go
near it again with that weedwhacker, and make especially
sure it goes into the winter deeply watered.

Kay


Thanks to all for the suggestions. I wished I'd read this thread
before purchasing and applying the tree sealer. Oh well, we'll see
how it goes. Thanks again.


If you like belt and suspenders, early next spring you can still bridgegraft
over the cut. But do be careful to water this summer and fall and please
get that mulch on. And around other trees you may have, too. Makes a big
difference in the amount of lawnmower blight you see.... ;-)

Kay

  #8  
Old 03-06-2007, 03:40 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 1,318
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

Mulch instructions "SUGGESTIONS"


proper Mulching - http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub3.html and

http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/index.html Look up "Mulch"

Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
Arborist
http://home.ccil.org/~treeman
and www.treedictionary.com
Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology.
Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us
that we are not the boss.
"Kay Lancaster" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 03 Jun 2007 00:09:34 -0000, Andrew Falanga
wrote:
In either case, get some mulch around that tree so you don't go
near it again with that weedwhacker, and make especially
sure it goes into the winter deeply watered.

Kay


Thanks to all for the suggestions. I wished I'd read this thread
before purchasing and applying the tree sealer. Oh well, we'll see
how it goes. Thanks again.


If you like belt and suspenders, early next spring you can still
bridgegraft
over the cut. But do be careful to water this summer and fall and please
get that mulch on. And around other trees you may have, too. Makes a big
difference in the amount of lawnmower blight you see.... ;-)

Kay



  #9  
Old 03-06-2007, 07:54 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 281
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

In article ,
Kay Lancaster wrote:

On Sun, 03 Jun 2007 00:09:34 -0000, Andrew Falanga wrote:
In either case, get some mulch around that tree so you don't go
near it again with that weedwhacker, and make especially
sure it goes into the winter deeply watered.

Kay


Thanks to all for the suggestions. I wished I'd read this thread
before purchasing and applying the tree sealer. Oh well, we'll see
how it goes. Thanks again.


If you like belt and suspenders, early next spring you can still bridgegraft
over the cut. But do be careful to water this summer and fall and please
get that mulch on. And around other trees you may have, too. Makes a big
difference in the amount of lawnmower blight you see.... ;-)

Kay


Feeling guilty for suggesting the tree sealer. But doesn't exposing the
heart wood of a tree open it up to serious problems. Yeah, I know, logic
is only as good as its' premise but, what is the premise here?

- Billy
Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
  #10  
Old 04-06-2007, 03:42 AM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 478
Default How to keep a pine tree alive

Feeling guilty for suggesting the tree sealer. But doesn't exposing the
heart wood of a tree open it up to serious problems. Yeah, I know, logic
is only as good as its' premise but, what is the premise here?


When they've done the experiments, looks like leaving it alone really is the
best option as far as "sealing". Turns out the sealer holds in enough
moisture to let the fungi grow. Harm done by your recommendation,
most likely little. Just one of the un-needed things they're happy to
sell you. g

Kay


 




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