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Deer eating my Hick's yew trees



 
 
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  #1  
Old 15-02-2008, 11:47 PM posted to rec.gardens
WPB
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Posts: 11
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

Hello, all: It's been an especially harsh winter here in Toronto and, for
the first time I've ever seen, some deer (2) have been coming up the ravine
into my backyard and have eating all the needles off my yew trees. My
question is two-fold:

1. Even though the damage is done and the deer aren't returning (there's
nothing left on the trees to eat), is there a way to deter them from coming
into my yard and nibbling my trees? I have a huge raccoon problem, too,
and have just given up on that.

2. More importantly, the deer have left the branches, but all the needles
on the bottom three feet of the tree are GONE. Will the tree recover and
replace its needles? Or is it a goner?

I'm grateful for any information or advice!

David
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  #2  
Old 16-02-2008, 12:46 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 389
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 22:47:35 -0000, WPB wrote:

Hello, all: It's been an especially harsh winter here in Toronto and, for
the first time I've ever seen, some deer (2) have been coming up the ravine
into my backyard and have eating all the needles off my yew trees. My
question is two-fold:

1. Even though the damage is done and the deer aren't returning (there's
nothing left on the trees to eat), is there a way to deter them from coming
into my yard and nibbling my trees? I have a huge raccoon problem, too,
and have just given up on that.

2. More importantly, the deer have left the branches, but all the needles
on the bottom three feet of the tree are GONE. Will the tree recover and
replace its needles? Or is it a goner?

I'm grateful for any information or advice!

David



I feel your pain. I lost many plants to deer. You can...

select plants less desirable to deer,
surround the plant with protective netting or fencing,
use an electric fence,
get a watch dog,
develop a taste for venison.
  #3  
Old 16-02-2008, 01:51 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 17
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

"WPB" wrote in message
...
2. More importantly, the deer have left the branches, but all the needles
on the bottom three feet of the tree are GONE. Will the tree recover and
replace its needles? Or is it a goner?


The yew won't die, but it will definitely be mis-shapened. Those needles
won't come back. The only hope is that new branches will bud out and fill
in. Usually after a few years, the damage isn't that noticeable. It's
definitely worse for upright growing yews versus low bushy ones.

-al sung
Rapid Realm Technology, Inc.
Hopkinton, MA (Zone 6a)


  #4  
Old 18-02-2008, 10:30 PM posted to rec.gardens
WPB
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Posts: 11
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

Thank you very much for the information! Just two more questions:

1. Should I snip off the stripped branches or just leave them?

2. Can you think of any attractive, thick bushes that are "deer-
resistent"?

Thanks again!

David


The yew won't die, but it will definitely be mis-shapened. Those
needles won't come back. The only hope is that new branches will bud
out and fill in. Usually after a few years, the damage isn't that
noticeable. It's definitely worse for upright growing yews versus low
bushy ones.

-al sung
Rapid Realm Technology, Inc.
Hopkinton, MA (Zone 6a)

  #5  
Old 18-02-2008, 10:32 PM posted to rec.gardens
WPB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

Thanks so much for your time and trouble. Well, the fencing would be
expensive and ruin the look of my backyard. As for venison, I'd love it,
but the deer would have to willingly commit suicide and then somehow
prepare themselves for the barbecue.

But you mention plants less desirable to deer. That might have to be the
route I go. Do you know of any bushes/shrubs that the deer would leave
alone?

Thanks again!

David


I feel your pain. I lost many plants to deer. You can...

select plants less desirable to deer,
surround the plant with protective netting or fencing,
use an electric fence,
get a watch dog,
develop a taste for venison.

  #6  
Old 18-02-2008, 11:23 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 188
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

WPB wrote:
Thanks so much for your time and trouble. Well, the fencing would
be
expensive and ruin the look of my backyard. As for venison, I'd
love
it, but the deer would have to willingly commit suicide and then
somehow prepare themselves for the barbecue.

But you mention plants less desirable to deer. That might have to
be
the route I go. Do you know of any bushes/shrubs that the deer
would
leave alone?

Thanks again!


Something to try if the layout allows it. May not work, but it's
cheap so if it doesn't you haven't lost much. Set three strands of
monofilament fishing line about chest high to a deer, pulled tight, a
few feet apart, so that if a deer breaks one and keeps going he'll
break another. The theory is that the deer can't see it, but when he
hits one and breaks it it snapls and startles him and he's not able to
figure out what caused it, so after a while they get conditioned to
avoid the area. Stuff is so thin that it's practically invisible.

David


I feel your pain. I lost many plants to deer. You can...

select plants less desirable to deer,
surround the plant with protective netting or fencing,
use an electric fence,
get a watch dog,
develop a taste for venison.


--
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)


  #7  
Old 19-02-2008, 05:01 PM posted to rec.gardens
WPB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

Great idea! Thank you!


Something to try if the layout allows it. May not work, but it's
cheap so if it doesn't you haven't lost much. Set three strands of
monofilament fishing line about chest high to a deer, pulled tight, a
few feet apart, so that if a deer breaks one and keeps going he'll
break another. The theory is that the deer can't see it, but when he
hits one and breaks it it snapls and startles him and he's not able to
figure out what caused it, so after a while they get conditioned to
avoid the area. Stuff is so thin that it's practically invisible.

  #8  
Old 19-02-2008, 05:12 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

In article ,
WPB wrote:

But you mention plants less desirable to deer. That might have to be the
route I go. Do you know of any bushes/shrubs that the deer would leave
alone?


Not a bush that deer will leave alone but once established, kerria
co-exists nicely with deer. Their winter munching serves as a natural
pruning that will result in a fuller bush. A nice compromise I think as
both parties win - the deer get some winter munchies and your bush
flourishes as a result. However, when the plants are young, the deer
munching can kill them. I just wrapped some wire fencing supported by
angle irons around their perimeter for the first 2 years to keep them
safe.

I lived on a wooded acre (including a ravine such as you mention having
at your place) for 20 years. The kerria were recommended to me by a
friend who also had heavy deer traffic on their property. Gave them a
try and I did enjoy them. They prefer full sunlight but mine were placed
in areas of partial light and did well (zone 5).

When hungry enough, deer will eat anything and everything...

--
Sharon F
  #9  
Old 20-02-2008, 06:23 PM posted to rec.gardens
WPB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

Thanks so much! That's great advice!

David


Not a bush that deer will leave alone but once established, kerria
co-exists nicely with deer. Their winter munching serves as a natural
pruning that will result in a fuller bush. A nice compromise I think
as both parties win - the deer get some winter munchies and your bush
flourishes as a result. However, when the plants are young, the deer
munching can kill them. I just wrapped some wire fencing supported by
angle irons around their perimeter for the first 2 years to keep them
safe.

I lived on a wooded acre (including a ravine such as you mention
having at your place) for 20 years. The kerria were recommended to me
by a friend who also had heavy deer traffic on their property. Gave
them a try and I did enjoy them. They prefer full sunlight but mine
were placed in areas of partial light and did well (zone 5).

When hungry enough, deer will eat anything and everything...


  #10  
Old 25-02-2008, 03:24 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 1
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees


"WPB" wrote in message
...
Thank you very much for the information! Just two more questions:

1. Should I snip off the stripped branches or just leave them?

2. Can you think of any attractive, thick bushes that are "deer-
resistent"?

Thanks again!

David



You might take a look at this website - I've gotten some good ideas from
them.

http://www.deerxlandscape.com/

IZ


  #11  
Old 29-02-2008, 10:35 PM posted to rec.gardens
WPB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Deer eating my Hick's yew trees

That's great! A whole website devoted to keeping the deer away. Thanks
very much!


http://www.deerxlandscape.com/


 




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