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Moving an apple tree...



 
 
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  #1  
Old 10-06-2011, 11:52 AM
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Default Moving an apple tree...

We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space, about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved (about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.
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  #2  
Old 10-06-2011, 07:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RachaelDavidson View Post
We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space, about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved (about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.
You can move the thing but there are afew things to do and also to bare in mind.
The branches of the tree will need to be drastically pruned back by about 2/3's otherwise this will stress the tree too much.
The branches will need to be pruned as no matter how big a rootball you can dig out with the tree, you'll have certainly have chopped off lots of the fine feeder roots which is unavoidable.

Do try to get as big a rootball as is possible though, this is the key to sucess!
If the tree is 15' tall, then the rootball and pruned branches should be of similar proportions (or maybe the rootball bigger if you can) say two and a half feet top and bottom.

Try to get hold of some sacking to wrap the rootball in after you've got the tree out of the ground, and keep the sacking wet to help stop drying out.
Make sure you have a big hole ready for the tree to go in to, as you want the thing to be out of the ground for as little time as possible.
Into the hole dig in some well rotted manure and some bonemeal, and if you can get it, some microrhiza rootgrow fungus, as this will help to encourage the roots back out after planting.
The hole needs to be at least 7-10" bigger around all sides than the rootball of the freshly dug up tree as this too will help the roots to break out back into the soil.
Fill the hole up with water right to the brim a couple of times to ensure that there will be plenty of moisture for the tree once it's planted, especially if you are in one of the drought stricken areas.

Next get a couple of folk to help you move the tree into position and plant the tree into the hole at the same level as it originally was in the ground.
Firm the soil down really well with the heel of your boot and make sure you have a good stake to ensure the tree cannot move around in the wind, as if it does, then you can get what is known as rootrock, where the rootball of the plant moves around under the ground and the freshly grown root are snapped off due to movement, and water in well.

Now for the most crucial bit WATERING!
I cannot stress enough how important this is, especially as we are in a serious drought and rainfall is doing absolutely nothing towards watering the garden.
I'd recommend making a little 'dam' with some of the soil around the edge of the newly planted tree, so as when you water, it's not able to run away and it stays where it's most needed.
You'll need to water at least once every couple of days or more if the temperatures get hot, and if you think of giving it around 2-3 watering can fulls of water per watering, or the same amount from a hosepipeish.

The tree will initially sulk and not do an awful lot, but hopefully, it should show signs of regrowth towards the back end of the summer.
This is a good sign, and generally means that the roots below ground are regrowing too!
Don't worry about feeding it this year though, as the manure and bonemeal are plenty enough.

The watering regime should finish when the first autumn rains are enough to keep the ground constantly moist and you should definately stop watering once the leaves fall.

Next year just keep an eye on the tree for signs of underwatering as it may not have grown enough roots yet, but only if it's been a dry winter and spring, otherwise I'd be inclined to leaving it alone and letting the plant 'seek' out it's own water by sending it's roots downwards.
Watering established plants only leads to the roots coming to the surface, which leaves then more at risk from drought.

Well, hope this helps, if you have anything else to ask then don't hesitate.
:-)
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  #3  
Old 10-06-2011, 07:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RachaelDavidson View Post
We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space, about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved (about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.
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  #4  
Old 10-06-2011, 09:14 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Moving an apple tree...

On Fri, 10 Jun 2011 11:46:33 -0700 (PDT), Heathcliff
wrote:

On Jun 10, 5:52*am, RachaelDavidson RachaelDavidson.
wrote:
We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden
patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space,
about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no
idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved
(about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.

--
RachaelDavidson


Is this a do-it-yourself project? There are contractors who
specialize in moving trees and have a specialized piece of equipment
(called a tree spade, at least in the U.S.) for doing so - see, e.g.,
http://www.ccicrane.com/tree.html. Alternatively, with a tree this
size you could probably have a good landscaping service move it by
hand. Or you could move it yourself.

The key is to get as big of a root ball with it as possible. In other
words, as much dirt as possible coming with it. For a tree this size,
maybe a three-foot diameter ball, which is going to be (a) a lot of
work to dig out, and (b) really heavy to lift and carry. First dig
the hole where the tree will go, then dig out the tree and put it in
the hole. Do not lift the tree by the trunk; lift the root ball from
underneath, using shovels as levers. If your soil is very sandy or
crumbly you may need to wrap up the root ball with fabric to help keep
it intact (e.g., an old sheet). Afterwards, no special care except
lots of water to help it get through the shock.

To get an idea of what you'll be dealing with, go to a tree nursery or
garden store and look at the trees they have for sale there. They may
have trees almost the same size for sale, pre-dug, so you can see how
big a container they are in and check out what would be involved in
moving it. -- H


It's very difficult for me to believe that a five year old apple tree
is about 15 feet tall. A five year old apple tree is maybe 1' caliper
and can't be more than 6' tall, and has a root ball that will easily
fit a five gallon pail. If truly five years old I'd dig it up with a
garden spade (pruning it's roots will help it acclimate to a move),
should take like ten minutes and move it to its new previously
prepared home... trim off about 1/3 if its top growth, water well, and
it should be fine. A fifteen foot tall apple tree would be more like
fifteen years old and 2 1/2" caliper. I can't think of any five year
old tree that can attain a 15' height.
  #5  
Old 11-06-2011, 05:58 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 2,358
Default Moving an apple tree...

"RachaelDavidson" wrote in
message ...

We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden
patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space,
about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no
idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved
(about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.


Yes you can dig it up and move it but do so in winter not whilst its in
active growth. You need to get as big a root ball as you can when you dig
around and under it - don't try this if you don't have adequate garden
tools - get a specialits or jsut cut it off and plant a new one in the new
spot. If you do try to move it yourselves have a heap of strong young male
friends on hand to help you to get plastic/hessian under the rootball and
then drag it on the plastic/hessian to its new hole and replant at the same
soil level as in its original position.


  #6  
Old 11-06-2011, 02:49 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 714
Default Moving an apple tree...

"FarmI" wrote:

"RachaelDavidson" wrote:

We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden
patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space,
about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no
idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved
(about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.


Yes you can dig it up and move it but do so in winter not whilst its in
active growth.


Not true... you're obviously no kind of farmer... even city kids know
that apple trees grow where the ground freezes in winter. The best
time to move apple trees is in early spring after the ground has
thawed but before the tree's buds open... or in fall after the leaves
drop but before the ground freezes (obviously). But moving apple
trees in spring is best... the tree will have several months for its
roots to become established before the ground freezes... fall planting
of apple trees is iffy, the tree will suffer a much longer period of
shock. If the tree hasn't already been moved I'd wait until spring.

http://landscaping.about.com/cs/shru...nsplanting.htm
  #7  
Old 11-06-2011, 07:14 PM
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Default

If you really want to keep the tree, there's some good advice already given, if you must move it.

But if it's not essential to move it now, here's some more. Leave it until November, it'll have a far better chance of surviving.
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  #8  
Old 12-06-2011, 12:32 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 2,929
Default Moving an apple tree...

Brooklyn1 wrote:
"FarmI" wrote:

"RachaelDavidson" wrote:

We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden
patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space,
about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have
absolutely no idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once
it's been moved (about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be
welcome.


Yes you can dig it up and move it but do so in winter not whilst its
in active growth.


Not true... you're obviously no kind of farmer... even city kids know
that apple trees grow where the ground freezes in winter. The best
time to move apple trees is in early spring after the ground has
thawed but before the tree's buds open... or in fall after the leaves
drop but before the ground freezes (obviously). But moving apple
trees in spring is best... the tree will have several months for its
roots to become established before the ground freezes... fall planting
of apple trees is iffy, the tree will suffer a much longer period of
shock. If the tree hasn't already been moved I'd wait until spring.

http://landscaping.about.com/cs/shru...nsplanting.htm


Apples grow in many places (and do well) where the ground doesn't freeze.
For example in Tasmania they harvest around 50,000 tons per year. I wonder
if you are simply showing your rather parochial viewpoint or do you know
this and have decided to try to start an argument anyway.

Rachael, don't move it when it is actively growing, this would be after the
leaves fall and before bud burst and, yes, digging may be difficult in
frozen ground if that applies to you.

D


  #9  
Old 12-06-2011, 08:30 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 2,358
Default Moving an apple tree...

"Brooklyn1" Gravesend1 wrote in message
...
"FarmI" wrote:

"RachaelDavidson" wrote:

We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden
patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space,
about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no
idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved
(about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.


Yes you can dig it up and move it but do so in winter not whilst its in
active growth.


Not true... you're obviously no kind of farmer... even city kids know
that apple trees grow where the ground freezes in winter.


LOL. We grow superb apples and our ground NEVER freezes in winter.


  #10  
Old 14-06-2011, 03:55 AM
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Posts: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmI View Post
"Brooklyn1" Gravesend1 wrote in message
...
"FarmI" wrote:

"RachaelDavidson" wrote:

We've just purchased a new cantilever glass veranda for our garden
patio. At the moment there is a 5 year old apple tree in the space,
about 15ft tall.

We're wondering if we can dig it up and relocate it? Have absolutely no
idea how to do this or how to care fore the tree once it's been moved
(about 30ft). any guidance or suggestions would be welcome.


Yes you can dig it up and move it but do so in winter not whilst its in
active growth.


Not true... you're obviously no kind of farmer... even city kids know
that apple trees grow where the ground freezes in winter.


LOL. We grow superb apples and our ground NEVER freezes in winter.


Nice informative post. It's really helpful and useful. Thanks.
 




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