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Egg shells as plant food



 
 
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  #16  
Old 30-01-2012, 11:46 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,912
Default Egg shells as plant food

Brooklyn1 wrote:
"David E. Ross" wrote:
songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy
of this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.

for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.

songbird


Agricultural lime is hard to find in my area.


That's utter nonsense... agri lime is sold at every plant nursery in
the US, everywhere that sells lawn maintence and farming products
sells agri lime... not to mention all over the internet. Where's this
secretive area you live... in your lonely drug crazed fantasy world...
you're being ridiculous and dishonest.


Amazing... truly amazing.

D
Ads
  #17  
Old 30-01-2012, 11:47 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 2,912
Default Egg shells as plant food

Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 7:13 am, songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.

songbird


Dolomitic lime adds calcium and magnesium, plus helps
to keep pH levels stable. Eggshells have the most benefit
with vermicomposting, keeps the crew healthy.


Provided your soil needs magnesium as well.

D
  #18  
Old 31-01-2012, 12:40 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 714
Default Egg shells as plant food

On Mon, 30 Jan 2012 12:01:15 -0800 (PST), Father Haskell
wrote:

On Jan 28, 10:28*pm, "David E. Ross" wrote:
On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. *I don't remember more. *I kept the container on the side
steps. *NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? *If yes, *then on which plants and how often.


TIA


HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. *Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water already
are quite alkaline.

For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be neutral.


Drywall scraps are a cheap, if not free, source.


Drywall does not readily dissolve into the soil and it also contains
several elements that may not be desirable, especially for food crops.
I wouldn't consider any building materials safe for amending soil. The
last people who lived here dumped a good sized pile of drywall in the
woods and it's still there in the same condition it was when I noticed
it more than ten years ago. I strongly suggest disposing of all
building materials properly and buy agri lime, it's cheap... I've
never seen wallboard marked Safe for Food Crops. Actually I think
people who cheap-out by using inapropriate materials for gardening are
definitely mentally ill... this Haskill creep is very sick. Ross and
Boson aren't too well wrapped either... I'd be very wary of these
kind. It's been my experience that tightwadedness is highly
indicative of severe psychosis... these are the kind of males who beat
their wives for buying new panties without their permission.
  #19  
Old 31-01-2012, 02:10 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 142
Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 30, 7:40*pm, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:
On Mon, 30 Jan 2012 12:01:15 -0800 (PST), Father Haskell









wrote:
On Jan 28, 10:28*pm, "David E. Ross" wrote:
On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:


Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. *I don't remember more. *I kept the container on the side
steps. *NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? *If yes, *then on which plants and how often.


TIA


HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. *Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water already
are quite alkaline.


For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be neutral..


Drywall scraps are a cheap, if not free, source.


Drywall does not readily dissolve into the soil and it also contains
several elements that may not be desirable, especially for food crops.


Fresh, regular white and gray sheetrock is gypsum, silicon,
cellulose, stuff that's already present in soil. Scrap from
demolition
contains a witch's brew of who the hell knows what, which should
be avoided, of course.

I wouldn't consider any building materials safe for amending soil. The
last people who lived here dumped a good sized pile of drywall in the
woods and it's still there in the same condition it was when I noticed
it more than ten years ago.


Needs to be busted up. One good soaking rain will handle the rest.

I strongly suggest disposing of all
building materials properly and buy agri lime, it's cheap... I've
never seen wallboard marked Safe for Food Crops.


Guess what clay buster is made from.

Actually I think
people who cheap-out by using inapropriate materials for gardening are
definitely mentally ill... this Haskill creep is very sick.


I prefer "cheap."

  #20  
Old 31-01-2012, 02:14 AM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 142
Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 30, 6:47*pm, "David Hare-Scott" wrote:
Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 7:13 am, songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.


songbird


Dolomitic lime adds calcium and magnesium, plus helps
to keep pH levels stable. *Eggshells have the most benefit
with vermicomposting, keeps the crew healthy.


Provided your soil needs magnesium as well.


If foliage is yellow, and not due to iron or nitrogen deficiency,
suspect Mg shortage. Hard to overdose with dolomite.

A spoonful of epsom salts is recommended when planting
tomatoes or peppers. These appreciate an extra dose of
magnesium.
  #21  
Old 31-01-2012, 06:32 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Posts: 771
Default Egg shells as plant food

On 1/30/12 6:14 PM, Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 6:47 pm, "David Hare-Scott" wrote:
Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 7:13 am, songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.


songbird


Dolomitic lime adds calcium and magnesium, plus helps
to keep pH levels stable. Eggshells have the most benefit
with vermicomposting, keeps the crew healthy.


Provided your soil needs magnesium as well.


If foliage is yellow, and not due to iron or nitrogen deficiency,
suspect Mg shortage. Hard to overdose with dolomite.

A spoonful of epsom salts is recommended when planting
tomatoes or peppers. These appreciate an extra dose of
magnesium.


Yellowing can by a symptom of zinc deficiency, especially with citrus
and gardenias. Yellowing can also be a symptom of soil that is too
alkaline or of over-watering. Finally, yellowing can be a sign that a
nearby underground natural gas line is leaking.

Magnesium promots the growth of new shoots. That is why I give each of
my roses about 2 tablespoonsful of Epsom salts in the late winter.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html
Gardening diary at http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary
  #22  
Old 02-02-2012, 05:10 AM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 330
Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 30, 6:14*pm, Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 6:47*pm, "David Hare-Scott" wrote:









Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 7:13 am, songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.


songbird


Dolomitic lime adds calcium and magnesium, plus helps
to keep pH levels stable. *Eggshells have the most benefit
with vermicomposting, keeps the crew healthy.


Provided your soil needs magnesium as well.


If foliage is yellow, and not due to iron or nitrogen deficiency,
suspect Mg shortage. *Hard to overdose with dolomite.

A spoonful of epsom salts is recommended when planting
tomatoes or peppers. *These appreciate an extra dose of
magnesium.


And airplane and cars have wheels, but can a car fly?

Very specifically it depends doesn't it? Your using a false analogy
  #23  
Old 03-02-2012, 04:37 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 330
Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 30, 6:14*pm, Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 6:47*pm, "David Hare-Scott" wrote:









Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 7:13 am, songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.


songbird


Dolomitic lime adds calcium and magnesium, plus helps
to keep pH levels stable. *Eggshells have the most benefit
with vermicomposting, keeps the crew healthy.


Provided your soil needs magnesium as well.


If foliage is yellow, and not due to iron or nitrogen deficiency,
suspect Mg shortage. *Hard to overdose with dolomite.

A spoonful of epsom salts is recommended when planting
tomatoes or peppers. *These appreciate an extra dose of
magnesium.


http://www.aces.edu/timelyinfo/Ag%20...er/s-05-05.pdf

"Coarsely crushed eggshells are relatively ineffective as a soil
liming material or as a source of calcium. Although the sample used in
this study had a total neutralizing value of 59% of pure calcium
carbonate, it had to be very finely ground in order to be effective at
increasing soil pH. Broken egg- shells can be safely land applied.
Nitrogen from protein residues in eggshells and possibly other
nutrients will eventually add to the fertility of the soil. Except for
nitrogen, this will probably be a*very slow process. Therefore, unless
shells are mechanically ground at least as finely as ground
agricultural limestone, they should not be used as a substitute for
conventional soil liming materials. However, we do not suspect any
negative effect from their application to the soil."

Also: http://www.aces.edu/timelyinfo/Ag%20...er/s-05-05.pdf
  #24  
Old 04-02-2012, 12:22 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 30, 6:40 pm, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:
these are the kind of males who beat
their wives for buying new panties without their permission.


Andy asks,

They let their wives wear panties.???.... There's yer problem,
right there.... !!!

:)))) Andy in Eureka, Texas
  #25  
Old 05-02-2012, 06:33 AM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 142
Default Egg shells as plant food

On Feb 2, 12:10*am, Gunner wrote:
On Jan 30, 6:14*pm, Father Haskell wrote:









On Jan 30, 6:47*pm, "David Hare-Scott" wrote:


Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 30, 7:13 am, songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.


songbird


Dolomitic lime adds calcium and magnesium, plus helps
to keep pH levels stable. *Eggshells have the most benefit
with vermicomposting, keeps the crew healthy.


Provided your soil needs magnesium as well.


If foliage is yellow, and not due to iron or nitrogen deficiency,
suspect Mg shortage. *Hard to overdose with dolomite.


A spoonful of epsom salts is recommended when planting
tomatoes or peppers. *These appreciate an extra dose of
magnesium.


And airplane and cars have wheels, but can a car fly?


Put a big enough engine on it, no problem.

Very specifically it depends doesn't it? *Your using a false analogy


  #26  
Old 05-02-2012, 10:34 PM posted to rec.gardens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 330
Default Egg shells as plant food

On Feb 4, 10:33*pm, Father Haskell wrote:
On Feb 2, 12:10*am, Gunner wrote:





Father Haskell wrote:


*Hard to overdose with dolomite.


Very incorrect statement.

A spoonful of epsom salts is recommended when planting
tomatoes or peppers. *These appreciate an extra dose of
magnesium.


No,Not in my soil or many of the myriad clay compositions.

You obviously do not understand soil science and as I said you are
using false analogies. Again I said airplane and cars have wheels,
but can a car fly?

You coyly reply "Put a big enough engine on it, no problem."

But old son, you would be hard pressed to find the horsepower
necessary to make your overreaching BS fly:

Hard to overdose with dolomite.

Patently false and I think you know that, or at least you should know
as much, when dispensing "gardening advice."

A spoonful of epsom salts is recommended when planting
tomatoes....


Again, so patently false. *While it may not affect some and even
benefit some others, it is no panacea. *And yes you can overdo
dolomite. In fact,this mythology*can be quite *detrimental to many.
*So to say "... A spoonful of Epsom ...is recommend when
planting ...." Is 100% USDA Prime *BS.

Even a quick search yields this refutation:
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/cabarrus/sta...efaq.html#L16:

You normally use dolomitic lime on sandy soils. Sandy soils don't have
any way to hold magnesium or calcium. Both are needed for plant growth
and should be added regularly. The only way to tell which lime you
need to use on clay soils is with a soil test. Clay soils with high
magnesium levels perform poorly. They will develop more cracks and
have a tighter structure. These soils don't need additional magnesium.
Look for the magnesium base saturation (Mg BS) percentage on a soil
test. The ideal Mg BS is 10%. Clay soils with Mg BS over 20% should
get calcitic lime. ...

Also see:
http://www.kinseyag.com/Article2.htm
http://www.smilinggardener.com/organ.../dolomite-lime
http://back-to-basics.net/efu/pdfs/pH.pdf
http://pubs.cas.psu.edu/FreePubs/pdfs/uc038.pdf
 




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