A Gardening forum. GardenBanter.co.uk

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » GardenBanter.co.uk forum » Gardening Discussions » Gardening
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Fast growing seed for science project



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 25-01-2003, 08:30 PM
BNtylions
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

My son is entering his school's science fair. His topic is growing seeds w/
various types of light. Does anyone have any ideas for the best kinds of seeds
to use for such a project.

PS - It's cold here too!!
Ads
  #2  
Old 25-01-2003, 10:49 PM
Cereoid+10
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

Beans. Kidney beans, Lima beans, take your choice.
Let your son do the research.


BNtylions wrote in message
...
My son is entering his school's science fair. His topic is growing seeds

w/
various types of light. Does anyone have any ideas for the best kinds of

seeds
to use for such a project.

PS - It's cold here too!!



  #3  
Old 25-01-2003, 11:39 PM
NauticalWheeler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

My son did a science project on different size seeds
a few years ago. ...."does the size of a seed make
a difference on how it grows?" Large seeds seemed to work best. I have
seen pumpkin, bean, sunflower and squash seeds used by other students. My
son used hyacinth bean seeds because that was the largest seed I had in the
house at the time. I got to plant the results in
the garden. I have also seen a project using grass
seed grown in styrofoam cups. They were placed
in different areas of the house bathroom, closets etc.
Another project was using different types of soils.
Good luck and I am sure you will have fun!


  #4  
Old 26-01-2003, 01:38 AM
samuel l crowe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

My grand daughter did a project such as you mentioned and she used radish
seeds, she got an "A"

--
Sam
Along the Grand Strand of Myrtle Beach SC

"BNtylions" wrote in message
...
My son is entering his school's science fair. His topic is growing seeds

w/
various types of light. Does anyone have any ideas for the best kinds of

seeds
to use for such a project.

PS - It's cold here too!!



  #5  
Old 26-01-2003, 03:28 AM
Cereoid+10
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

Ah hem, it's supposed to be her son's science project not hers.

Me thinks the spoiled brat will be having all the fun supervising while
somebody else does all the work!


NauticalWheeler wrote in message
...
My son did a science project on different size seeds
a few years ago. ...."does the size of a seed make
a difference on how it grows?" Large seeds seemed to work best. I have
seen pumpkin, bean, sunflower and squash seeds used by other students. My
son used hyacinth bean seeds because that was the largest seed I had in

the
house at the time. I got to plant the results in
the garden. I have also seen a project using grass
seed grown in styrofoam cups. They were placed
in different areas of the house bathroom, closets etc.
Another project was using different types of soils.
Good luck and I am sure you will have fun!




  #6  
Old 26-01-2003, 05:43 AM
Mahasamatman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

Any rapidly germinating seed will work. Bean seeds are the
traditional choice for student projects like that, though most
anything else will work.

Sam

"BNtylions" wrote in message
...
My son is entering his school's science fair. His topic is growing seeds

w/
various types of light. Does anyone have any ideas for the best kinds of

seeds
to use for such a project.

PS - It's cold here too!!



  #9  
Old 27-01-2003, 05:05 AM
Cereoid+10
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

Wonder where I read somebody recommend bean seeds?

You forget Mushmouth that the person who is asking the question knows
absolutely nothing about seeds and she is doing all the work for her son who
apparently couldn't give a fig anyway.



Mahasamatman wrote in message
hlink.net...
Any rapidly germinating seed will work. Bean seeds are the
traditional choice for student projects like that, though most
anything else will work.

Sam

"BNtylions" wrote in message
...
My son is entering his school's science fair. His topic is growing

seeds
w/
various types of light. Does anyone have any ideas for the best kinds

of
seeds
to use for such a project.

PS - It's cold here too!!





  #10  
Old 27-01-2003, 05:17 AM
Cereoid+10
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

Seems to me that the science project is far more a new learning experience
for the kids mother than the spoiled brat himself!!!!

As Froggy points out, this tired old experiment has been done millions of
times over and is in every intro to science textbook. So, why hasn't
Scooter's mommy caught on to where is the best place to look for the answer
to her question? Where in the heck is Scooter? Why isn't he the one on the
pooter doing his own homework?

The classic version of this experiment is done with bean seeds.

Geez Anne, we already know how things will turn out. They turns out badly!!!


Ann wrote in message
...
(Frogleg) expounded:

How many thousands of science projects have been done on this subject?
Seems to me a project ought to present some *new* hypothesis and
experimentation. Sounds as if your son's teacher may have said, "...or
you could start some seeds with different lights..." Why not question
the kid into thinking up some interesting variation on a tired old
theme?


Did you ever consider that itisn't a tired old theme to a young child?
The experiment is for him to learn and show, not impress the current
science world. While your suggestions are good ones, the theme of
using different kinds of lights is interesting, too. And hopefully
the child pulls it off well and gets a good grade.

To the original poster, sunflowers would be interesting. They react
very well to light direction, too. Beans are fast germinators, too,
as has been suggested. Please let us know how things turn out!

--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
********************************



  #11  
Old 27-01-2003, 01:27 PM
Frogleg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

On Sun, 26 Jan 2003 09:48:24 -0500, Ann wrote:

(Frogleg) expounded:

How many thousands of science projects have been done on this subject?
Seems to me a project ought to present some *new* hypothesis and
experimentation. Sounds as if your son's teacher may have said, "...or
you could start some seeds with different lights..." Why not question
the kid into thinking up some interesting variation on a tired old
theme?


Did you ever consider that itisn't a tired old theme to a young child?
The experiment is for him to learn and show, not impress the current
science world. While your suggestions are good ones, the theme of
using different kinds of lights is interesting, too. And hopefully
the child pulls it off well and gets a good grade.


You have a point. However, I'm thinking about a sort of scientific
method ideal, in which a more or less original thesis is proposed and
examined. Making a model of the solar system is new to a young child,
but isn't exactly an original thought. There are many ways something
old could be *made* interesting. And kids have interesting ideas. An
old idea could be presented as an advertisement, or with a humorous
slant. Even failures can be analyzed for presentation. I meant to
suggest a little stimulation to tap into some real interest or
question of the kid's. There's that annoying stage they all go through
of constantly asking "why?" They're endlessly curious. This is a time
to listen for the "whys" and suggest ways to pursue them.
  #12  
Old 27-01-2003, 02:53 PM
animaux
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

The dumbing down of America.

On Mon, 27 Jan 2003 05:05:37 GMT, "Cereoid+10" wrote:

Wonder where I read somebody recommend bean seeds?

You forget Mushmouth that the person who is asking the question knows
absolutely nothing about seeds and she is doing all the work for her son who
apparently couldn't give a fig anyway.



Mahasamatman wrote in message
thlink.net...
Any rapidly germinating seed will work. Bean seeds are the
traditional choice for student projects like that, though most
anything else will work.

Sam

"BNtylions" wrote in message
...
My son is entering his school's science fair. His topic is growing

seeds
w/
various types of light. Does anyone have any ideas for the best kinds

of
seeds
to use for such a project.

PS - It's cold here too!!





  #13  
Old 27-01-2003, 07:00 PM
Alice Gamewell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fast growing seed for science project

Radish is a good choice. Not only do they germinate fairly fast, you can have a
radish in about 21 days.

BNtylions wrote:

My son is entering his school's science fair. His topic is growing seeds w/
various types of light. Does anyone have any ideas for the best kinds of seeds
to use for such a project.

PS - It's cold here too!!


 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Culinary herbFAQ part 5/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 31-03-2003 01:56 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 3/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 31-03-2003 01:56 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 2/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 31-03-2003 01:56 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 5/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 28-02-2003 06:29 PM
Culinary herbFAQ part 2/7 Henriette Kress Edible Gardening 0 28-02-2003 06:27 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright 2004-2014 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.