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Hardy Hibiscus



 
 
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  #1  
Old 16-04-2005, 12:54 PM
Paulo
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Default Hardy Hibiscus

I am looking for hardy Hibiscus (Toronto, ZOne 5B)
I was searching on the intternet but i couldnt find much about hardy
hibiscus, if somebody can help me out....

Also, i have na indoor hibiscus and I dont know if it is a hardy variety, is
it any way i cna find out without risking the plant? ( I mean, i dont wanna
leave it outside during winter to see if was or not...) It was flowering non
stop during summer time, and even when i moved the pot indoors did not stop
flowering for few more month

THanks

--
Paulo


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  #2  
Old 16-04-2005, 10:38 PM
Cereus-validus.....
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Hibiscus is a very large genus. Which type of hardy Hibiscus are you looking
for? Annual, perennial or shrub?

If you are growing a shrubby tropical Hibiscus indoors, you can be sure that
it is not cold hardy, especially in Toronto.

"Paulo" wrote in message
. ..
I am looking for hardy Hibiscus (Toronto, ZOne 5B)
I was searching on the intternet but i couldnt find much about hardy
hibiscus, if somebody can help me out....

Also, i have na indoor hibiscus and I dont know if it is a hardy variety,
is it any way i cna find out without risking the plant? ( I mean, i dont
wanna leave it outside during winter to see if was or not...) It was
flowering non stop during summer time, and even when i moved the pot
indoors did not stop flowering for few more month

THanks

--
Paulo



  #3  
Old 16-04-2005, 11:14 PM
Paulo
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Default

Well, i think i should learn morea bout hibiscus, i didnt know about annual
hibiscus.
I am looking for a shrub type.

Paulo

"Cereus-validus....." wrote in message
m...
Hibiscus is a very large genus. Which type of hardy Hibiscus are you
looking for? Annual, perennial or shrub?

If you are growing a shrubby tropical Hibiscus indoors, you can be sure
that it is not cold hardy, especially in Toronto.

"Paulo" wrote in message
. ..
I am looking for hardy Hibiscus (Toronto, ZOne 5B)
I was searching on the intternet but i couldnt find much about hardy
hibiscus, if somebody can help me out....

Also, i have na indoor hibiscus and I dont know if it is a hardy variety,
is it any way i cna find out without risking the plant? ( I mean, i dont
wanna leave it outside during winter to see if was or not...) It was
flowering non stop during summer time, and even when i moved the pot
indoors did not stop flowering for few more month

THanks

--
Paulo





  #4  
Old 17-04-2005, 01:25 AM
[email protected]
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There are several species of hibiscus, but in general, "hardy hibiscus"
or perennial hibiscus is the name used here in the midwest for 2
different species of herbaceous hibiscus- Hibiscus moscheutos, and H.
coccineus. Both are sold at nurseries everywhere as perennial
hibiscus, though H. moscheutos is much more common. Hibiscus syriacus,
which is a hardy woody shrub, is also extremely common here and is
usually sold under the name "rose of sharon" or "althea". Your indoor
plant is most likely a variety of the tropical Hibiscus rosa-sinensis.
It can be confusing sometimes, and this is a perfect example of why
using common names for plants is not usually an effective way of
identifying them.

Toad

  #5  
Old 17-04-2005, 09:50 AM
Hemmaholic
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Paulo,

If you do a search for Hibiscus moscheutos you should get several hits.
Use the Google search engine for best results.

Hemma

  #6  
Old 17-04-2005, 10:45 AM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Nov 2004
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 239
Default

I am looking for hardy Hibiscus (Toronto, ZOne 5B) I was searching on the intternet but i couldnt find much about hardy hibiscus, if somebody can help me out....

Also, i have na indoor hibiscus and I dont know if it is a hardy variety, is it any way i cna find out without risking the plant? ( I mean, i dont wanna leave it outside during winter to see if was or not...) It was flowering non stop during summer time, and even when i moved the pot indoors did not stop flowering for few more month

THanks
--
Paulo[/QUOTE]

Quote:
Originally Posted by
There are several species of hibiscus, but in general, "hardy hibiscus" or perennial hibiscus is the name used here in the midwest for 2 different species of herbaceous hibiscus- Hibiscus moscheutos, and H. coccineus. Both are sold at nurseries everywhere as perennial hibiscus, though H. moscheutos is much more common. Hibiscus syriacus, which is a hardy woody shrub, is also extremely common here and is usually sold under the name "rose of sharon" or "althea". Your indoor plant is most likely a variety of the tropical Hibiscus rosa-sinensis.
It can be confusing sometimes, and this is a perfect example of why using common names for plants is not usually an effective way of identifying them.

Toad

Hi Paulo,

Great info from Toad. Here's how you can tell if you have a hardy hibiscus or a tropical one.
http://www.trop-hibiscus.com/gindr.html

Here's sites about hardy hibiscus - Hibiscus moscheutos
http://www.bachmans.com/tipsheets/Pe...dyHibiscus.cfm
http://my.pclink.com/~harley/hibiscus.htm

Though this site is primarily about tropical hibiscus, it shows to to propagate and repot.
http://www.rozpat.net/Basics%20and%20Beyond.htm

Newt
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  #7  
Old 17-04-2005, 01:49 PM
Paulo
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Default

Thanks Hemma


"Hemmaholic" wrote in message
oups.com...
Paulo,

If you do a search for Hibiscus moscheutos you should get several hits.
Use the Google search engine for best results.

Hemma



  #8  
Old 18-04-2005, 05:43 PM
Leon Trollski
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Default


wrote in message
oups.com...

Hibiscus syriacus,



This is hard to find, are there any comments or suggestions on this species?


  #9  
Old 18-04-2005, 06:31 PM
paghat
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Default

In article UAQ8e.1065577$6l.507193@pd7tw2no, "Leon Trollski"
wrote:

wrote in message
oups.com...

Hibiscus syriacus,



This is hard to find, are there any comments or suggestions on this species?


If it's hard to find in your local nurseries, might it be because it isn't
suited to your area? Around Puget Sound it is a standard nursery offering,
though not this early in the year, the nurseries like to get them in
summer bloom, so available around June. When they start flowering they
keep doing it until early autumn.

In my zone they are very easy deciduous shrubs, exceedintgly flowerful for
the xeriscape (low water) garden in fullest sun. There are fully fertile
cultivars of which probably 'Blue Bird' is the standard, & it will
self-seed all over tarnation:
http://www.paghat.com/roseofsharonblue.html
The National Arboretum released a series of sterile cultivars which are
more compact, very good shrubs; I have one of those, 'Aphrodite':
http://www.paghat.com/roseofsharon.html
In theory they can be grown down to Zone 5 but I suspect they would be
more sensitive below Zone 7; in zones 7-9 they're impervious shrubs, &
among my favorites.

They make good xeriscape companions with Lavetera tree mallows, which in
our zone are almost evergreen. Most tree-mallows no matter the cultivar
look pretty much like this one:
http://www.paghat.com/gaymallow.html
though 'Burgundy Wine' is smaller than average & some can get quite large,
& ther is a golden-leafed variety which stands out from the crowd, in the
main tree mallows don't have a wide range of flower type. But if one looks
far & wide, can eventually find forms with flowers other than some shade
of dark purply-pink, like this extremely pale 'Barnsley':
http://www.paghat.com/treemallow.html

-paghat the ratgirl
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