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Replanting "Rose of Sharon"



 
 
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  #1  
Old 17-07-2005, 02:27 AM
Newsgroups
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Default Replanting "Rose of Sharon"


My mom would like to give me some Rose of Sharon that she has in her
yard. These were given to my mom many years ago by an Uncle and I don't
want to do anything before knowing the correct way to do it.

Is there a particular time of year that I can take these from my mom's
garden and put in my garden? Is the summer too not to do this? When
would the best time of year be to move them.

Thank you all in advance.

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  #2  
Old 17-07-2005, 02:58 AM
Vox Humana
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"Newsgroups" wrote in message
oups.com...

My mom would like to give me some Rose of Sharon that she has in her
yard. These were given to my mom many years ago by an Uncle and I don't
want to do anything before knowing the correct way to do it.

Is there a particular time of year that I can take these from my mom's
garden and put in my garden? Is the summer too not to do this? When
would the best time of year be to move them.

Thank you all in advance.


Are you talking about the original plants that is now "years" old, or
seedlings?


  #3  
Old 17-07-2005, 03:32 AM
paghat
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In article .com,
"Newsgroups" wrote:

My mom would like to give me some Rose of Sharon that she has in her
yard. These were given to my mom many years ago by an Uncle and I don't
want to do anything before knowing the correct way to do it.

Is there a particular time of year that I can take these from my mom's
garden and put in my garden? Is the summer too not to do this? When
would the best time of year be to move them.

Thank you all in advance.


Several plants are called rose of sharon & the name is especially apt to
connote different plants in England than in the USA. If you mean Hibiscus
syriacus, an old established shrub might or might not transplant
successfully but it's certainly worth a try. Small specimens (three to
five feet) transplant with great success. If it is a fertile variety that
self-seeded all over the garden (as you indicate your mom has a lot of
them) the young plants are very easy to transplant by getting a big gob of
their soil &amp not damaging their roots at all. But really old big woody
specimens will end up getting their roots hacked up pretty badly by a move
& will be sensitive for their first year. The hard thing to balance is
that it won't be drought-hardy until it re-establishes its hacked up
roots, but it will be at risk of root rot if kept too wet during the
must-be-watered period. After it re-establishes it might never need
watering ever again depending on your local weather patterns.

I would be most inclined to move an adult hibiscus in late winter or early
spring, as if it is moved in autumn it could rot during its first winter
while it is at its weakest from the shock (if your winters are as rainy as
ours).

It is also easy to start rose-of-sharon hibiscus from summer softwood
cuttings & they transplant from out of starting-pots without shock
(seedlings rarely look like the parents, & some varieties are entirely
sterile so can only be started from cuttings). If you're transplanting
really large shrubs, I'd simultaneously start some cuttings in pots, so in
case they don't transplant successfully you'll still have the same
variet(ies) from the cuttings.

If the plant you mean is aaron's beard or saint john's wart, Hypericum
calycinum is over-used, invasive, & weedy, a threat to all perennials in
its vincinity. There are much better saint john's warts to be planting, &
one with blooms as large & showy at H. calycinum is sold as 'Hidcote.'

-paghat the ratgirl
--
Get your Paghat the Ratgirl T-Shirt he
http://www.paghat.com/giftshop.html
"In every country and in every age, the priest has been hostile to
liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot." -Thomas Jefferson
  #4  
Old 17-07-2005, 03:56 AM
B & J
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"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

"Newsgroups" wrote in message
oups.com...

My mom would like to give me some Rose of Sharon that she has in her
yard. These were given to my mom many years ago by an Uncle and I don't
want to do anything before knowing the correct way to do it.

Is there a particular time of year that I can take these from my mom's
garden and put in my garden? Is the summer too not to do this? When
would the best time of year be to move them.

Thank you all in advance.


Are you talking about the original plants that is now "years" old, or
seedlings?

Take cuttings in the spring and root them, which is extremely easy with a
rose of sharon. Then you'll have clones of the original and won't have to
worry about trying to move a huge bush. I have two rose of sharons seven
feet tall and in full bloom from cuttings I took four years ago from a
double pink and a double purplish variety. BTW, they begin blooming when
extremely small, and I had many blossoms the first year after I planted
them.

JPS


  #5  
Old 17-07-2005, 05:39 PM
Vox Humana
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Default


"B & J" wrote in message
news:2ViCe.5485$Zt.4108@okepread05...

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

"Newsgroups" wrote in message
oups.com...

My mom would like to give me some Rose of Sharon that she has in her
yard. These were given to my mom many years ago by an Uncle and I don't
want to do anything before knowing the correct way to do it.

Is there a particular time of year that I can take these from my mom's
garden and put in my garden? Is the summer too not to do this? When
would the best time of year be to move them.

Thank you all in advance.


Are you talking about the original plants that is now "years" old, or
seedlings?

Take cuttings in the spring and root them, which is extremely easy with a
rose of sharon. Then you'll have clones of the original and won't have to
worry about trying to move a huge bush. I have two rose of sharons seven
feet tall and in full bloom from cuttings I took four years ago from a
double pink and a double purplish variety. BTW, they begin blooming when
extremely small, and I had many blossoms the first year after I planted
them.


I have one that I planted about 4 years ago. It was only a few inches high,
and bloomed the second year. It seeds itself easily and now I have several
that I need to remove. The problem I am experiencing is that the flowers
are falling off just before they open. The entire stem breaks off where it
meets the branch. I don't see any insects or obvious disease.


  #6  
Old 18-07-2005, 04:49 AM
B & J
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"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

BTW, they begin blooming when
extremely small, and I had many blossoms the first year after I planted
them.


I have one that I planted about 4 years ago. It was only a few inches
high,
and bloomed the second year. It seeds itself easily and now I have
several
that I need to remove. The problem I am experiencing is that the flowers
are falling off just before they open. The entire stem breaks off where
it
meets the branch. I don't see any insects or obvious disease.

The only time I've seen buds dry up and fall off is when they receive
insufficient moisture. I have a single along the road that receives little
moisture in the summer unless I make it a point to use the hose on it, which
is seldom. It was loaded with blossoms when we had a couple of heavy rains
earlier, but most of the buds it produces now dry up and fall off before
opening in 90+ heat without any measurable rain for the past three weeks. It
does produce occasional blossoms that half open.

BTW, the one benefit about the doubles that I really like is that neither
produces seeds. I'm not constantly weeding out small plants. I do deadhead
the single when I remember because it is a prolific seed producer.

JPS


  #7  
Old 18-07-2005, 06:29 PM
paghat
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Posts: n/a
Default

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

BTW, they begin blooming when
extremely small, and I had many blossoms the first year after I planted
them.


I have one that I planted about 4 years ago. It was only a few inches
high,
and bloomed the second year. It seeds itself easily and now I have
several
that I need to remove. The problem I am experiencing is that the flowers
are falling off just before they open. The entire stem breaks off where
it
meets the branch. I don't see any insects or obvious disease.


When stressed, some shrubs, & hibiscuses are particularly susceptible to
this, will produce a big dose of the chemical hormone ethylene which
causes buds to fall loose from the branches in about two days. It's a
self-preservation technique so a shrub can concentrate on staying alive
instead of flowering & fruiting. This typically happens with
transplanting, or with lack of sufficient watering, over-watering,
over-fertilizing, exposure to pollution in the air or from garden
chemicals, lack of beneficial fungal microorganisms in the soil, or
fighting off a harmful root fungus or grubs amidst the roots, or from
being a new planting unused to its new conditions.

It's hard to say what the "fix" would be since so many factors can be
stress causing; you have to figure out the stressing factor.

Non-organic growers use an ethylene-suppressant & other nasty chemicals to
keep shrubs smart-looking for the longest possible length of time for
potted sales of shrubs in bloom. It's one of many nasty tricks done to
plants hence to customers who'll see the specimen decline rapidly & blame
their own lack of a green thumb, when in reality the shrub had just been
in a state of artificial preservation long enough to get the sale before
its weeks of stress getting to market show effect.

-paghat the ratgirl
--
Get your Paghat the Ratgirl T-Shirt he
http://www.paghat.com/giftshop.html
"In every country and in every age, the priest has been hostile to
liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot." -Thomas Jefferson
  #8  
Old 18-07-2005, 07:25 PM
Vox Humana
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Posts: n/a
Default


"paghat" wrote in message
news
"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

BTW, they begin blooming when
extremely small, and I had many blossoms the first year after I planted
them.


I have one that I planted about 4 years ago. It was only a few inches
high,
and bloomed the second year. It seeds itself easily and now I have
several
that I need to remove. The problem I am experiencing is that the

flowers
are falling off just before they open. The entire stem breaks off where
it
meets the branch. I don't see any insects or obvious disease.


When stressed, some shrubs, & hibiscuses are particularly susceptible to
this, will produce a big dose of the chemical hormone ethylene which
causes buds to fall loose from the branches in about two days. It's a
self-preservation technique so a shrub can concentrate on staying alive
instead of flowering & fruiting. This typically happens with
transplanting, or with lack of sufficient watering, over-watering,
over-fertilizing, exposure to pollution in the air or from garden
chemicals, lack of beneficial fungal microorganisms in the soil, or
fighting off a harmful root fungus or grubs amidst the roots, or from
being a new planting unused to its new conditions.

It's hard to say what the "fix" would be since so many factors can be
stress causing; you have to figure out the stressing factor.

Non-organic growers use an ethylene-suppressant & other nasty chemicals to
keep shrubs smart-looking for the longest possible length of time for
potted sales of shrubs in bloom. It's one of many nasty tricks done to
plants hence to customers who'll see the specimen decline rapidly & blame
their own lack of a green thumb, when in reality the shrub had just been
in a state of artificial preservation long enough to get the sale before
its weeks of stress getting to market show effect.


Great information. I would guess that it may be too much water. I haven't
used any fertilizer but I have watered and it has gone from too dry to too
wet.


  #9  
Old 31-07-2005, 02:05 AM
Newsgroups
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Default

originals that are years old.

 




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