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Battery for Moisture Detector



 
 
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  #16  
Old 06-04-2016, 03:19 AM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 18
Default Battery for Moisture Detector

On 4/5/2016 8:03 PM, wrote:

On this thread battery life was never mentioned. You just want to
prove how big a prick you are.
Stormin Moron.


Thank you for displaying your true personality.

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  #21  
Old 17-04-2016, 02:31 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 70
Default Battery for Moisture Detector

"Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney" wrote in message news
I've got a moisture detector that takes a 9v battery, and it says not to use an alkaline battery. Never seen that type of warning before. Anyone know why an alkaline battery is not recommended?

Thanks.


Thanks for the comments. I have tried to reach the mfr but no response so far. Will post whatever I find out.


  #22  
Old 17-04-2016, 06:26 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden,alt.home.repair
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Default Battery for Moisture Detector

"Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney" wrote in message news I've got a moisture detector that takes a 9v battery, and it says not to use an alkaline battery. Never seen that type of warning before. Anyone know why an alkaline battery is not recommended?

Thanks.

===

About the comments about differences in current between battery types. My understanding is that 9V is 9V and the current is determined by the resistance in the circuit.

  #23  
Old 17-04-2016, 06:47 PM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 22
Default Battery for Moisture Detector

On Sun, 17 Apr 2016 10:26:07 -0700, "Snuffy \"Hub Cap\" McKinney"
wrote:

"Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney" wrote in message news I've got a moisture detector that takes a 9v battery, and it says not to use an alkaline battery. Never seen that type of warning before. Anyone know why an alkaline battery is not recommended?

Thanks.

===

About the comments about differences in current between battery types. My understanding is that 9V is 9V and the current is determined by the resistance in the circuit.

Well, apparently Snuffy will not see my reply unless someone re-posts
it - but so be it. The current drawn is dependent on the resistance of
the circuit. This is true, but there is resistance in 2 very different
and separate parts of the circuit - the source and the load. The
"internal resistance" of the battery limits how much current the
battery can supply - irrespective of the "current draw" dictated by
the load resistance. If the internal resiatance of the battery is too
high, the voltage across the load will drop to well below 9 volts in
use. The power dissipated across the internal resistance of the
battery as heat will compromise the life of the battery, reducing the
total net power available from the battery to a fraction of what would
be available into a higher resistance, or lower "powered" load.
  #24  
Old 18-04-2016, 04:50 AM posted to alt.home.lawn.garden,alt.home.repair
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Posts: 70
Default Battery for Moisture Detector

wrote in message ...
On Sun, 17 Apr 2016 10:26:07 -0700, "Snuffy \"Hub Cap\" McKinney"
wrote:

"Snuffy "Hub Cap" McKinney" wrote in message news I've got a moisture detector that takes a 9v battery, and it says not to use an alkaline battery. Never seen that type of warning before. Anyone know why an alkaline battery is not recommended?

Thanks.

===

About the comments about differences in current between battery types. My understanding is that 9V is 9V and the current is determined by the resistance in the circuit.

Well, apparently Snuffy will not see my reply unless someone re-posts
it - but so be it. The current drawn is dependent on the resistance of
the circuit. This is true, but there is resistance in 2 very different
and separate parts of the circuit - the source and the load. The
"internal resistance" of the battery limits how much current the
battery can supply - irrespective of the "current draw" dictated by
the load resistance. If the internal resiatance of the battery is too
high, the voltage across the load will drop to well below 9 volts in
use. The power dissipated across the internal resistance of the
battery as heat will compromise the life of the battery, reducing the
total net power available from the battery to a fraction of what would
be available into a higher resistance, or lower "powered" load.


Thanks for reposting. I missed it the first time. Would an alkaline battery be more susceptible to developing a high internal resistance than the el cheapo type?


 




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