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What Grass Turns Brown in Winter in Zone-6?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 21-04-2005, 04:14 PM
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Default What Grass Turns Brown in Winter in Zone-6?

I would like to know the type of grass that is green and thick in warm
weather and turns completely brown in winter year after year. I see
this type of grass in a few people lawn near where I live (in Zone-6
Northern New Jersey). What is it?

Now, those lawns that have this grass are gradually turning green in a
very even manner. I am wondering whether they are warm season grass
that are planted in a cold region. That would have explained why they
are growing well even in hot weather. But if that is the case, I am
wondering how they can surrive the cold winter and bounce back now.

This type of grass tends to grow thick and not much weeds. But it turns
to yellow/brown (more yellow than brown) in winter. Therefore, I would
not like it in my lawn. I am asking this just for curiosity.

Thanks for any info.

Jay Chan

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  #2  
Old 21-04-2005, 05:13 PM
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Sounds like Zoysia. It's suited to much warmer climates, but can
easily grow in the northeast and survive hard winters. It goes a light
brown, more like straw color in Oct in NJ and remains that way till
May. One of my neighbors has it and it looks like hell. It's also
very invasive and spreads through runners. I've seen it break up
asphalt driveways by invading the cracks. In warm weather, it grows
very dense and crowds out weeds.

  #3  
Old 21-04-2005, 09:29 PM
Heidi the Horrible
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wrote in message
oups.com...
Sounds like Zoysia. It's suited to much warmer climates, but can
easily grow in the northeast and survive hard winters. It goes a light
brown, more like straw color in Oct in NJ and remains that way till
May. One of my neighbors has it and it looks like hell. It's also
very invasive and spreads through runners. I've seen it break up
asphalt driveways by invading the cracks. In warm weather, it grows
very dense and crowds out weeds.



Zoysia is a fabulous grass under the right conditions but NJ is probably too
far north to make a nice lawn grass.

It is very thick, grows very slowly, requires almost no water, and rarely
gets weeds. Here in N Virginia, it greens up earlier than bermuda and
spreads slower than bermuda. It can also handle winter kill better than
bermuda.

It will turn brown with the first good frost. We are beginning to green up
the zoysia right now in VA but May is the real green-up time.

Zoysia is a nice grass for steep hillsides.

HtH


  #5  
Old 22-04-2005, 02:14 PM
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Thanks for the info that HtH, Steveo, and you have provided.

Your description of Zoysia fits perfectly with the grass that I see.

Good thing none of my adjacent neighbors have this type of grass in
their lawn. I don't need to worry about if this grass spreads to my
lawn. Its "straw" color surely doesn't look that great in the
landscape.

Strange thing is that local home centers don't carry the grass seeds of
this grass. Seem like the homeowners had gone out of the way to put
this type of grass on their lawn.

Sounds like Zoysia. It's suited to much warmer climates, but can
easily grow in the northeast and survive hard winters. It goes a

light
brown, more like straw color in Oct in NJ and remains that way till
May. One of my neighbors has it and it looks like hell. It's also
very invasive and spreads through runners. I've seen it break up
asphalt driveways by invading the cracks. In warm weather, it grows
very dense and crowds out weeds.


Jay Chan

  #6  
Old 22-04-2005, 02:22 PM
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"Strange thing is that local home centers don't carry the grass seeds
of
this grass"

In this area, no one in their right mind would use it, os no one
carries it. Plus, Zoysia is very difficult to grow from seed and is
typically sold as plugs. The way it winds up in NJ is people read the
little cute adds in the sunday paper describing it as a miracle grass
and order it online or by mail.

  #7  
Old 24-04-2005, 02:43 AM
Winston Smith
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It was planted in my lawn by the previous owner for erosion control. At one
point, the hillside had slipped and this was part of the solution, along
with a staggered row blue spruce pines, to hold back the dirt. It has
worked just fine in that regard for the last 20 years although it isn't the
best looking grass I've ever seen.

"Heidi the Horrible" wrote in message
...
Zoysia is a nice grass for steep hillsides.

HtH



 




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