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Frozen Oleanders, what to do



 
 
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  #1  
Old 12-03-2003, 06:08 PM
jac
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Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

Hi folks;
during the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. Now some of the leave are turning brown and some of
the major limbs are still droopy. What is the best way to turn them
around? Should all "obviously" damaged limbs be cut back? How far?
thanks for any advice someone can offer.
jac


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  #2  
Old 12-03-2003, 11:12 PM
animaux
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Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

On Wed, 12 Mar 2003 17:01:20 GMT, jac wrote:

Hi folks;
during the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. Now some of the leave are turning brown and some of
the major limbs are still droopy. What is the best way to turn them
around? Should all "obviously" damaged limbs be cut back? How far?
thanks for any advice someone can offer.
jac


Cut it back till you have green. You can cut it back to the ground and it
should come back. There is a pathogen which is putting oleander in decline in
the Austin area.

Last year my oleander was 6 feet tall and froze to the ground. I cut them back
and they were 6 feet again by the end of last year's growing season. My answer
to you is to cut it back however far you must to see green in the stems. Remove
everything dead, including leaves which turned brown. Don't leave it as mulch,
get rid of it, but don't burn it or rub your eyes and wear gloves. There is a
pretty strong sap which can be and usually is toxic.
  #3  
Old 12-03-2003, 11:35 PM
jac
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Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

Thanks very much..
I'm glad to hear they come back fast, and thanks for the toxin warning. I knew about
the toxicity for animals, but I never thought about it for myself.. much thanks
jac


animaux wrote:

On Wed, 12 Mar 2003 17:01:20 GMT, jac wrote:

Hi folks;
during the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. Now some of the leave are turning brown and some of
the major limbs are still droopy. What is the best way to turn them
around? Should all "obviously" damaged limbs be cut back? How far?
thanks for any advice someone can offer.
jac


Cut it back till you have green. You can cut it back to the ground and it
should come back. There is a pathogen which is putting oleander in decline in
the Austin area.

Last year my oleander was 6 feet tall and froze to the ground. I cut them back
and they were 6 feet again by the end of last year's growing season. My answer
to you is to cut it back however far you must to see green in the stems. Remove
everything dead, including leaves which turned brown. Don't leave it as mulch,
get rid of it, but don't burn it or rub your eyes and wear gloves. There is a
pretty strong sap which can be and usually is toxic.


  #4  
Old 13-03-2003, 01:13 AM
Gary Brady
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Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

uring the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. snip. What is the best way to turn them
around? jac


Just cut em back to the undamaged part. They'll grow back. I've got some
Oleanders out by my shop bldg. that have been through at least 2 ice storms
and several other freezes with absolutely no damage. I can only guess that the
proximity of the trees and shop protect them. Maybe you need a few cuttings
from my "cold hardys".
Gary Brady
Austin, TX
  #5  
Old 13-03-2003, 05:20 AM
jac
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Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

Hi Gary;
Good to hear from you. I would figger' that you have freeze proof plants G!
jac

Gary Brady wrote:

uring the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. snip. What is the best way to turn them
around? jac


Just cut em back to the undamaged part. They'll grow back. I've got some
Oleanders out by my shop bldg. that have been through at least 2 ice storms
and several other freezes with absolutely no damage. I can only guess that the
proximity of the trees and shop protect them. Maybe you need a few cuttings
from my "cold hardys".
Gary Brady
Austin, TX


  #6  
Old 13-03-2003, 03:09 PM
animaux
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Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

All oleanders are hardy in this USDA Zone 8b, Heat Zone 9a. They are not
evergreen as they are in Florida, but I've seen some with large north wall
exposure which are evergreen. Mine are out in an island bed in the front to
screen the bubba and his pink flamingo's next door.

Victoria

On Thu, 13 Mar 2003 04:12:39 GMT, jac wrote:

Hi Gary;
Good to hear from you. I would figger' that you have freeze proof plants G!
jac

Gary Brady wrote:

uring the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. snip. What is the best way to turn them
around? jac


Just cut em back to the undamaged part. They'll grow back. I've got some
Oleanders out by my shop bldg. that have been through at least 2 ice storms
and several other freezes with absolutely no damage. I can only guess that the
proximity of the trees and shop protect them. Maybe you need a few cuttings
from my "cold hardys".
Gary Brady
Austin, TX


  #7  
Old 13-03-2003, 05:44 PM
Gary Brady
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Posts: n/a
Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

Good to hear from you. I would figger' that you have freeze proof plants G!

Actually, I've been wanting these things to freeze back a little so I would
have an excuse to cut 'em back. They've completely crowded out two Texas
Mountain Laurels in the same bed. Some of the Oleander trunks are 1 1/2" dia,
too big for the loppers. I don't really relish the idea of sawing them down
and getting the sap all over me. If anybody wants any cuttings, I've got em to
spare.
Gary Brady
Austin, TX
  #8  
Old 20-03-2003, 12:44 AM
Mr. Chaos 007
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Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

Kill those poisoness monsters. Good god they are far more toxic than most
any other plant in the landscape. What if the kids got a hold of it. My
God!




"jac" wrote in message ...
Hi folks;
during the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. Now some of the leave are turning brown and some of
the major limbs are still droopy. What is the best way to turn them
around? Should all "obviously" damaged limbs be cut back? How far?
thanks for any advice someone can offer.
jac




  #9  
Old 20-03-2003, 04:32 AM
jac
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Posts: n/a
Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

oh puhleeeze!!!!!!
Get a grip.

"Mr. Chaos 007" wrote:

Kill those poisoness monsters. Good god they are far more toxic than most
any other plant in the landscape. What if the kids got a hold of it. My
God!

"jac" wrote in message ...
Hi folks;
during the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. Now some of the leave are turning brown and some of
the major limbs are still droopy. What is the best way to turn them
around? Should all "obviously" damaged limbs be cut back? How far?
thanks for any advice someone can offer.
jac



  #10  
Old 28-03-2003, 04:56 PM
Uncle Ron
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Posts: n/a
Default Frozen Oleanders, what to do

My guess is that your Oleander has caught the "Oleander Blight" or
"leaf rust" that has been spreading from SoCal across the South to
Texas and eastward. Your description sounds like it. What you are
seeing is not freeze damage, but this (assumed) bacterial infection.

I have read otherwhere on the Net that there is no cure, and the life
expectancy of the plant/bush after infection is 2 years. My 15' bush
has been following this track. Nothing to do with freeze.

Pruning doesn't help. Even pruning with disinfected (and continually
disinfecting) sheers has not been helpful from what I have read...

I read that Texas A&M had possibly identified the pathogen, but I have
read of no cure over the last 6 months... I see numerous dead and
dying Oleanders all around Williamson county, TX. Looks like a plague
on Oleanders...


jac wrote in message ...
Thanks very much..
I'm glad to hear they come back fast, and thanks for the toxin warning. I knew about
the toxicity for animals, but I never thought about it for myself.. much thanks
jac


animaux wrote:

On Wed, 12 Mar 2003 17:01:20 GMT, jac wrote:

Hi folks;
during the freeze a couple of weeks back, a hedgeline of Oleanders got
bitten fairly well. Now some of the leave are turning brown and some of
the major limbs are still droopy. What is the best way to turn them
around? Should all "obviously" damaged limbs be cut back? How far?
thanks for any advice someone can offer.
jac


Cut it back till you have green. You can cut it back to the ground and it
should come back. There is a pathogen which is putting oleander in decline in
the Austin area.

Last year my oleander was 6 feet tall and froze to the ground. I cut them back
and they were 6 feet again by the end of last year's growing season. My answer
to you is to cut it back however far you must to see green in the stems. Remove
everything dead, including leaves which turned brown. Don't leave it as mulch,
get rid of it, but don't burn it or rub your eyes and wear gloves. There is a
pretty strong sap which can be and usually is toxic.

  #11  
Old 24-03-2010, 04:52 PM
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2010
Posts: 1
Default

I have had oleanders around my home for 6 years and have 3 grandchildren and 2 dogs. No one has become sick yet from the oleanders. They were frozen from January's hard freeze so will try cutting back. They are so beautiful I will never get rid of them.
 




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