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Feeding Pecan Trees



 
 
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  #1  
Old 03-04-2005, 12:57 AM
Harold E. Robbins
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Default Feeding Pecan Trees

Anyone have any advice for feeding Pecan trees? Mine is pretty anemic
and I thought a good nutritional feeding might help. Your advice would
be appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 03-04-2005, 09:57 AM
cat daddy
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"Harold E. Robbins" wrote in message
. ..
Anyone have any advice for feeding Pecan trees? Mine is pretty anemic
and I thought a good nutritional feeding might help. Your advice would
be appreciated.


This page is not coming up for me right now, but it is what I am
following for the trees in our park.
http://www.heirloomgardenexperts.com...ruit-trees.htm

Basically, nitrogen fertilizer and zinc are applied in February/March and
again in May/June. I'm using used coffee grounds (about 200 lbs. per tree),
an Epsom salt drench (1lb. per tree in 6 gallons of water) and
alfalfa/compost tea (to be applied this week, late). I'm not interested in
pecan production at this time.
It is also suggested to mulch around the tree and keep it watered.

HOME FRUIT PRODUCTION - PECANS
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/e...can/pecan.html

Mature Trees - Nitrogen

Apply 1 pound (2 cups) of 21-0-0 or 33-0-0 for each inch of trunk diameter
in late March before bud break.

Zinc

Frequent zinc sprays are essential for rapid tree growth. Trees deficient in
zinc usually have small, weak leaves,

ORGANIC PECAN AND FRUIT TREE PROGRAM
http://www.aehf.com/articles/GarrettOrgTree.htm
FERTILIZING PROGRAM FOR PECANS AND FRUIT TREES




Round #1 February 1-15 - organic fertilizer @ 20 lbs./1,000 sq. ft. (i.e.
Garden-Ville, GreenSense, Bioform Dry, MaestroGro, Sustane or natural meals.
Lava sand at 80 lbs./1,000 sq. ft., and Wheat bran/Cornmeal Soil Amendment
at 50 lbs./1,000 sq. ft.

Round #2 June 1-15 - organic fertilizer @ 10 lbs./1,000 sq. ft and Texas
greensand @ 40-80 lbs./1,000 sq. ft. or soft rock phosphate at the same rate
if in acid soils.

Round #3 September 15-30 - organic fertilizer @ 10 lbs./1,000 sq. ft., and
sul-po-mag @ 20 lbs./1,000 sq. ft.

Note: Once soil health has been achieved, round #3 can be omitted..


http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC1356.htm
Zinc nutrition is especially important in pecan production. Zinc deficiency
is called rosette. The most common and noticeable symptoms of rosette are
bronzing and mottling of leaves; early defoliation; dead twigs in tops of
trees;

Zinc needs are best determined by a laboratory analysis of leaf samples
taken in late July or early August


  #3  
Old 04-04-2005, 04:18 AM
Harold E. Robbins
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Default

Reply, thanks a million.....


Harold

cat daddy wrote:

"Harold E. Robbins" wrote in message
. ..

Anyone have any advice for feeding Pecan trees? Mine is pretty anemic
and I thought a good nutritional feeding might help. Your advice would
be appreciated.



This page is not coming up for me right now, but it is what I am
following for the trees in our park.
http://www.heirloomgardenexperts.com...ruit-trees.htm

Ba

  #4  
Old 05-04-2005, 06:56 PM
Treedweller
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On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 22:57:31 GMT, "Harold E. Robbins"
wrote:

Anyone have any advice for feeding Pecan trees? Mine is pretty anemic
and I thought a good nutritional feeding might help. Your advice would
be appreciated.


I'm sure the info put forth by Cat Daddy is good, but I encourage you
to think about this differently.

Don't feed your trees. Feed your soil. Semantics, perhaps, but it
highlights an important fact. Trees absorb nutrients from the soil in
conjunction with symbiotic fungi. If the soil is sterile dirt and you
dump on some nitrogen, the tree will absorb some of it and put on some
new leaf growth, but won't really thrive. Later, when it comes time
to support that extragrowth, the tree may have to work too hard and
suffer. Feeding the soil is indirect, but more effective, as organic
material decomposes and releases all its nutrients back into the soil
instead of just dosing up the nitrogen level.

If the soil is rich, permeable, and happy, the tree roots will be
happy, and the tree will follow suit. Of the previous suggestions,
I'd say the most important one was to mulch. This is a global
tree-related answer, by the way, not a geared-to-produce-nuts answer.

Adding a 3.5" layer of mulch all around the tree (out to the dripline
would be excellent, but less is better than none and more is even
better) leads to better drainage, more even soil moisture, less
competition from weeds and grass, less compaction, and a more active
soil ecosystem (bacteria, fungi, worms, bugs, etc.). To "feed" the
equation more, you could start with a layer (maybe 1/2" or so) of
composted manure, then top with wood chips, bark, or some other
organic mulch. As always, be careful not to pile the mulch against
the bottom of the tree trunk; it needs to be exposed to air.

Again, this is not to contradict Cat Daddy. I just think we should be
thinking in these terms when we evaluate fertilization
recommendations.

Keith Babberney
ISA Certified Arborist

  #5  
Old 07-04-2005, 01:42 AM
cat daddy
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Treedweller" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 22:57:31 GMT, "Harold E. Robbins"
wrote:

Anyone have any advice for feeding Pecan trees? Mine is pretty anemic
and I thought a good nutritional feeding might help. Your advice would
be appreciated.


I'm sure the info put forth by Cat Daddy is good, but I encourage you
to think about this differently.

Don't feed your trees. Feed your soil. Semantics, perhaps, but it
highlights an important fact. Trees absorb nutrients from the soil in
conjunction with symbiotic fungi. If the soil is sterile dirt and you
dump on some nitrogen, the tree will absorb some of it and put on some
new leaf growth, but won't really thrive. Later, when it comes time
to support that extragrowth, the tree may have to work too hard and
suffer. Feeding the soil is indirect, but more effective, as organic
material decomposes and releases all its nutrients back into the soil
instead of just dosing up the nitrogen level.

If the soil is rich, permeable, and happy, the tree roots will be
happy, and the tree will follow suit. Of the previous suggestions,
I'd say the most important one was to mulch. This is a global
tree-related answer, by the way, not a geared-to-produce-nuts answer.

Adding a 3.5" layer of mulch all around the tree (out to the dripline
would be excellent, but less is better than none and more is even
better) leads to better drainage, more even soil moisture, less
competition from weeds and grass, less compaction, and a more active
soil ecosystem (bacteria, fungi, worms, bugs, etc.). To "feed" the
equation more, you could start with a layer (maybe 1/2" or so) of
composted manure, then top with wood chips, bark, or some other
organic mulch. As always, be careful not to pile the mulch against
the bottom of the tree trunk; it needs to be exposed to air.

Again, this is not to contradict Cat Daddy. I just think we should be
thinking in these terms when we evaluate fertilization
recommendations.


I am a great believer in the soilfoodweb and lasagna approach to
gardening. I'm totally organic and a compost and compost tea maker. Nothing
you said contradicts what I believe, although I can see how you could think
that from the aggie link I provided.
Gardening is just the by-product of compost making and plants are just
the result of feeding the worms and microherd...... }:-)
I'm now introducing "nurse logs" to promote mychorrizal fungi. (Actually,
I've always left logs lying around as habitat for lizards and bugs, but now
I have a cool name for it and an understanding of its other benefit......)

Keith Babberney
ISA Certified Arborist



 




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