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Olive trees in North of England



 
 
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  #1  
Old 19-08-2005, 08:56 AM
aaj
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Default Olive trees in North of England

Hi

I'm a new gardener with lots of questions and after some advice.

1) We would love to have an Olive tree in the corner of our garden, but I'm
a little worried if it would survive a Northern winter. I have read some
other posts suggesting a southern city might be Ok, but it might struggle in
a Northern location. Although the winters don't seem as bad as they used to
be, we are quite high up (between Bradford and Leeds), and there are spells
of a few days/weeks where it is bitterly cold, especially with the wind
chill factor.

The tree would be protected on two sides by a fence, and in contrast to the
cold it would get winter and summer sun all day from about 10 am.

2) Assuming it is possible to grow an olive tree outside, I would like to
grow one from a sappling . We inherited a large green house, so perhaps I
could plant it in a pot and start it in there first. I would like to have a
tree about 10', is this a reasonable size or are they normally bigger.?How
quickly do they grow?

many thanks for any advice

Andy







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  #2  
Old 19-08-2005, 10:04 AM
Nick Maclaren
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Default

In article 1124434590.6724320977a98414420d42bd0b795f84@teran ews,
aaj wrote:

1) We would love to have an Olive tree in the corner of our garden, but I'm
a little worried if it would survive a Northern winter. I have read some
other posts suggesting a southern city might be Ok, but it might struggle in
a Northern location. Although the winters don't seem as bad as they used to
be, we are quite high up (between Bradford and Leeds), and there are spells
of a few days/weeks where it is bitterly cold, especially with the wind
chill factor.


It's a good question. They are a lot hardier than is often believed,
but I don't know what they are sensitive to. A good start is to
ensure that they are in free-draining soil and never get waterlogged,
as few Mediterranean plants like winter wet.

The tree would be protected on two sides by a fence, and in contrast to the
cold it would get winter and summer sun all day from about 10 am.


That it would be happy with :-)

2) Assuming it is possible to grow an olive tree outside, I would like to
grow one from a sappling . We inherited a large green house, so perhaps I
could plant it in a pot and start it in there first. I would like to have a
tree about 10', is this a reasonable size or are they normally bigger.?How
quickly do they grow?


Very reasonable. They aren't very fast growers.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #3  
Old 19-08-2005, 10:13 AM
Martin Brown
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Default

aaj wrote:

I'm a new gardener with lots of questions and after some advice.

1) We would love to have an Olive tree in the corner of our garden, but I'm
a little worried if it would survive a Northern winter. I have read some
other posts suggesting a southern city might be Ok, but it might struggle in
a Northern location. Although the winters don't seem as bad as they used to
be, we are quite high up (between Bradford and Leeds), and there are spells
of a few days/weeks where it is bitterly cold, especially with the wind
chill factor.

The tree would be protected on two sides by a fence, and in contrast to the
cold it would get winter and summer sun all day from about 10 am.


I have a couple of small olive trees up in N Yorkshire (they are slow
growing) in pots. One survives outside all the time (but is a bit manky)
and the other gets put under shelter for the worst of the winter.

It is the relentless grey damp that gets them to rot. Dry continental
winter cold they could handle without any difficulty.

2) Assuming it is possible to grow an olive tree outside, I would like to
grow one from a sappling . We inherited a large green house, so perhaps I
could plant it in a pot and start it in there first. I would like to have a
tree about 10', is this a reasonable size or are they normally bigger.?


In the Meditteranean yes. How big is your bank balance? I suspect a
mature tree grown in hot climate would object violently to the shock of
being dumped in cold dank Yorkshire winters but I may be wrong.

How quickly do they grow?


Rather slowly. And much more slowly in the N UK when they barely get out
of dormancy before it is back to winter again. Mine (~1m tall) have just
finally got a full set of nice new leaves out in August. Don't expect to
ripen any fruit. Growing season is extended if grown under glass.

Figs are a lot more rewarding. You can get ripe edible fruit off them
growing outside even here if you have the space.

Regards,
Martn Brown
  #4  
Old 19-08-2005, 10:36 AM
p.k.
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Default

Martin Brown wrote:

Rather slowly. And much more slowly in the N UK when they barely get
out of dormancy before it is back to winter again. Mine (~1m tall)
have just finally got a full set of nice new leaves out in August.
Don't expect to ripen any fruit. Growing season is extended if grown
under glass.



I got 2 olives off mine last season - none this year! (London SW19)

My tree went in two autumns ago at about 2m and is now 3m+.

If you can, avoid buying at Garden Centres! If you know someone in the trade
(Designer, gardener, landscaper) who has access to trade suppliers speak to
them nicely and they will be able to supply at a deep discount off GC
prices. I can get 2m-ish trees for 30-ish ex - trade nursery (Italian stock
imported by the thousand). Similar stock I see in Garden Centres for around
100.

pk



  #5  
Old 19-08-2005, 10:46 AM
Kay
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Default

In article 1124434590.6724320977a98414420d42bd0b795f84@teran ews, aaj
writes

Although the winters don't seem as bad as they used to
be, we are quite high up (between Bradford and Leeds),


Hi - that describes my location exactly - where are you? - email me if
you don't want to go public with the info
--
Kay
"Do not insult the crocodile until you have crossed the river"

  #6  
Old 22-08-2005, 09:26 AM
aaj
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Posts: n/a
Default

Many thansk for the replies, I'll have a read through during lunch later
today.

"aaj" wrote in message
news:1124434590.6724320977a98414420d42bd0b795f84@t eranews...
Hi

I'm a new gardener with lots of questions and after some advice.

1) We would love to have an Olive tree in the corner of our garden, but
I'm a little worried if it would survive a Northern winter. I have read
some other posts suggesting a southern city might be Ok, but it might
struggle in a Northern location. Although the winters don't seem as bad as
they used to be, we are quite high up (between Bradford and Leeds), and
there are spells of a few days/weeks where it is bitterly cold, especially
with the wind chill factor.

The tree would be protected on two sides by a fence, and in contrast to
the cold it would get winter and summer sun all day from about 10 am.

2) Assuming it is possible to grow an olive tree outside, I would like to
grow one from a sappling . We inherited a large green house, so perhaps I
could plant it in a pot and start it in there first. I would like to have
a tree about 10', is this a reasonable size or are they normally
bigger.?How quickly do they grow?

many thanks for any advice

Andy









  #7  
Old 22-08-2005, 03:55 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2004
Posts: 15
Default

Hi,

I live in the Alps and planted an olive a couple of years ago. We generally get lows of -15 to -18 and quite a lot of snow. The first year some leaves stayed on and new growth happened at the top. This year it completely died back to ground level but has really nice new growth around the base. I use a fleece to wrap it up in the winter.

I think it is worth you having a go with a small plant, maybe near(ish) a warm wall. Experimenting is one of the best bits of gardening I think! Soemone earlier said to make sure drainage is good which is a good idea. I would be surprised if you got olives but if you do then pencil me in for a bottle of extra virgin!

Darren
  #8  
Old 06-09-2005, 05:33 PM
Judith Lea
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Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Nick Maclaren
writes
2) Assuming it is possible to grow an olive tree outside, I would like to
grow one from a sappling . We inherited a large green house, so perhaps I
could plant it in a pot and start it in there first. I would like to have a
tree about 10', is this a reasonable size or are they normally bigger.?How
quickly do they grow?


Very reasonable. They aren't very fast growers.


It will take ten years to produce drupes that are worthwhile. They can,
and will, fruit until they are around 500 years old and maybe longer.
Prune bi-annually. They are about 8-12 fungus diseases which can cause
total drupe loss in a given year but these are easily treated at an
early stage. Smoking, (not fags!) also helps to keep the tree healthy
and aphid free.

I have a house in the Auvergne, very hot summers but skiing conditions
in the Winter. I intend having a conservatory built outside the house
for olives (for my own oil) as they could not survive the harsh weather.
I intend to cultivate Grecian Olives rather than the smaller Italian
ones. I have a lot to read up on yet before I make my purchases and any
advice from olive growers would be appreciated.

I have just bought Carol Drinkwater's book on Olives (the screen wife of
the vet in All Creatures Great and Small). She and her husband have
purchased a derelict farm in the hills of Nice, (Cote D'Azur) and
uncovered 75 olive trees. It a massive tome and I look forward to
reading it.

--
Judith Lea
 




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