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Gypsum



 
 
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  #1  
Old 29-07-2006, 09:13 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Gypsum

I've read that Gypsum is the best material for breaking down clay soil.
But! Where can one buy it? Garden centres try to sell their own
alternatives and builders supplies have never heard of it.
Herman


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  #2  
Old 29-07-2006, 09:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,752
Default Gypsum


In article ,
"herman" writes:
|
| I've read that Gypsum is the best material for breaking down clay soil.
| But! Where can one buy it? Garden centres try to sell their own
| alternatives and builders supplies have never heard of it.

Well, it is doubtfully effective, but it is the principle component of
building plaster.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #4  
Old 30-07-2006, 06:56 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,752
Default Gypsum


In article ,
Chris Hogg writes:
|
| Why do you say 'doubtfully effective'? I'm puzzled. Gypsum is slightly
| more soluble than hydrated lime (0.223% cf. 0.185% at 0C), and
| supplies calcium ions to flocculate the clay particles just as lime
| does. I would have thought it would be just as effective. You know
| different? Or are you suggesting lime isn't very effective either?

Yes. Changing the character of a soil needs a LOT of additive, and
I haven't heard of anyone who has much success in the long term.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #6  
Old 31-07-2006, 06:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 22
Default Gypsum

Gypsum CaSO4.2H2O is recommended as an agent if you don't want to raise the
pH of the soil. With a formula weight 182 it is weight for weight less
effective than hydrated lime. (Formula weight 71). Usually lime is added to
raise the pH as well as cause edge flocculation in the clay.
Gypsum is the main ingredient of plaster board and is the compound which is
formed when water is added to plaster of Paris (CaSO4.0.5H20)
Clay soils are quite well buffered so unless you really want to keep pH down
use lime.
A useful compromise is to use chalk which weathers down, is not strongly
alkaline on application (pH 8 cf 12 for lime) and with a formula weigh of
100 is good value weight for weight.
(As an aside I grew brassiccas successfully in land infested with club root
by planting the seedlings with a ball of powdered chalk mixed with compost
around their roots.)
Regards
David T
"Pam Moore" wrote in message
...
On 29 Jul 2006 20:17:16 GMT, (Nick Maclaren) wrote:


In article ,
"herman" writes:
|
| I've read that Gypsum is the best material for breaking down clay soil.
| But! Where can one buy it? Garden centres try to sell their own
| alternatives and builders supplies have never heard of it.

Well, it is doubtfully effective, but it is the principle component of
building plaster.


Who remembers Acta Bacta? Didn't that contain gypsum?

Pam in Bristol



  #7  
Old 26-05-2009, 05:31 PM
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Posts: 2
Default

[QUOTE
Who remembers Acta Bacta? Didn't that contain gypsum?

Pam in Bristol [/i][/color][/quote]

I remember Acta Bacta and have been trying to track it down for years. I found a leaflet inside my rather ancient copy of The RD Guide to Gardening and it has an address Easi-Gro Limited, Marlborough Road, Aldbourne, Wiltshire, SN8 2DD and an old telephone number 0672 40888 - not enough digits. It says in the leaflet that "the main ingredient of ACTA-BACTA is a natural organic substance so rich in humus that nearly 90% of its dry weight consists of humus particles in just hte right state for rapid incorporation in the soil. This explains its wonder-working properties - breaking up clay, improving soil texture, encouraging the useful soil organisms, holding moisture in dry weather, acting as a Bank for plant foods and so on."
I used to use in in my old garden and it was brilliant and now I have moved to very heavy sticky clay I would love to find it again. Can anyone help?
  #8  
Old 26-05-2009, 05:36 PM
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Posts: 2
Default

[QUOTE
Who remembers Acta Bacta? Didn't that contain gypsum?

Pam in Bristol [/i][/color][/quote]

I remember Acta Bacta and have been trying to track it down for years. I found a leaflet inside my rather ancient copy of The RD Guide to Gardening and it has an address Easi-Gro Limited, Marlborough Road, Aldbourne, Wiltshire, SN8 2DD and an old telephone number 0672 40888 - not enough digits. It says in the leaflet that "the main ingredient of ACTA-BACTA is a natural organic substance so rich in humus that nearly 90% of its dry weight consists of humus particles in just hte right state for rapid incorporation in the soil. This explains its wonder-working properties - breaking up clay, improving soil texture, encouraging the useful soil organisms, holding moisture in dry weather, acting as a Bank for plant foods and so on."
I used to use in in my old garden and it was brilliant and now I have moved to very heavy sticky clay I would love to find it again. Can anyone help?
  #9  
Old 10-04-2012, 05:29 PM
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Apr 2012
Posts: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by herman View Post
I've read that Gypsum is the best material for breaking down clay soil.
But! Where can one buy it? Garden centres try to sell their own
alternatives and builders supplies have never heard of it.
Herman
Remarkably, its true. But I think the excessive is not good at all. Coz the gypsum can destroy the fertility of the land. So, you must be careful about it.
 




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