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how to grow hawthorn from a cutting?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 18-03-2008, 07:57 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1
Default how to grow hawthorn from a cutting?

I'd be grateful if someone could tell me how I might grow hawthorn
from a cutting. The cutting I've got is about a foot long and is
sitting in a glass of water. What should I do next???

Thanks!!

Regards,

John
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  #3  
Old 19-03-2008, 02:22 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 185
Default how to grow hawthorn from a cutting?

Charlie Pridham says...
In article 16eed379-3ff5-4c9c-ac43-
,
says...
I'd be grateful if someone could tell me how I might grow hawthorn
from a cutting. The cutting I've got is about a foot long and is
sitting in a glass of water. What should I do next???

Thanks!!

Regards,

John

AS far as I am aware they do not do from cuttings and are produced
commercially from seed, budding or grafting. That being so your next step
is probably to place in the compost heap! However the last time this came
up there was one person who swore blind that he had done them from hard
wood cuttings stuck in the ground (can't remember who it was) I was not
able to replicate his results however.


I too tried hawthorn from cuttings many years ago and
didn't get a single one to root. Also tried holly without
success. However, I normally have good success with other
hedging shrubs such as pyracanthus - I've grown cuttings
for an entire hedgerow from a single plant.

We seem to get lots of self set hawthorn seedlings here
around the flower beds, presumably where birds drop the
seeds. I've been collecting these and growing them on in
pots until they are large enough to put in a hedgerow.

Hawthorne (quick thorn) is dirt cheap to buy anyway as bare
root stock for hedging. I'm just too mean to buy it,
especially when there is some growing for free. :-)
--
David in Normandy.

To e-mail you must include the password FROG on the
subject line, or it will be automatically deleted.
  #4  
Old 19-03-2008, 03:29 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 84
Default how to grow hawthorn from a cutting?

David in Normandy wrote:

I too tried hawthorn from cuttings many years ago and
didn't get a single one to root. Also tried holly without
success. However, I normally have good success with other
hedging shrubs such as pyracanthus - I've grown cuttings
for an entire hedgerow from a single plant.

Is there a best time?
  #5  
Old 19-03-2008, 03:56 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 185
Default how to grow hawthorn from a cutting?

Stuart Noble says...
David in Normandy wrote:

I too tried hawthorn from cuttings many years ago and
didn't get a single one to root. Also tried holly without
success. However, I normally have good success with other
hedging shrubs such as pyracanthus - I've grown cuttings
for an entire hedgerow from a single plant.

Is there a best time?


I usually take my cuttings in Autumn from semi-ripe wood.
The bits that root the best tend to be strong fresh growth
but not the thin green shoots. I take lots of cuttings and
ram them all into an 8 inch pot with a mixture of garden
soil and sand in. The cuttings themselves are around 6 to 8
inches long and it tear off all leaves and side shoots
below a couple at the top - leather gloves are useful for
this - just run your fingers from top to bottom in one
swift motion tearing the leaves, spines and side shoots
off. This is just a guess but I think tearing is better
than trimming and may encourage the plant to root better.
Anyway I bury most of the cutting below the surface - the
more leaf nodes buried the more chance it will root from
one of them. Shoots torn off giving heel cuttings are also
good.
Just leave the pot in semi shade. At the side of an East
facing wall is good. Water the pot occasionally in Summer
or dry weather so it never completely dries out. By the
following Autumn tip the pot out and prick out the ones
with roots into separate pots.
--
David in Normandy.
To e-mail you must include the password FROG on the
subject line, or it will be automatically deleted.
  #6  
Old 19-03-2008, 04:56 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 84
Default how to grow hawthorn from a cutting?

David in Normandy wrote:
Stuart Noble says...
David in Normandy wrote:

I too tried hawthorn from cuttings many years ago and
didn't get a single one to root. Also tried holly without
success. However, I normally have good success with other
hedging shrubs such as pyracanthus - I've grown cuttings
for an entire hedgerow from a single plant.

Is there a best time?


I usually take my cuttings in Autumn from semi-ripe wood.
The bits that root the best tend to be strong fresh growth
but not the thin green shoots. I take lots of cuttings and
ram them all into an 8 inch pot with a mixture of garden
soil and sand in. The cuttings themselves are around 6 to 8
inches long and it tear off all leaves and side shoots
below a couple at the top - leather gloves are useful for
this - just run your fingers from top to bottom in one
swift motion tearing the leaves, spines and side shoots
off. This is just a guess but I think tearing is better
than trimming and may encourage the plant to root better.
Anyway I bury most of the cutting below the surface - the
more leaf nodes buried the more chance it will root from
one of them. Shoots torn off giving heel cuttings are also
good.
Just leave the pot in semi shade. At the side of an East
facing wall is good. Water the pot occasionally in Summer
or dry weather so it never completely dries out. By the
following Autumn tip the pot out and prick out the ones
with roots into separate pots.


Thanks, David. I did more or less what you're suggesting last Autumn but
without success. Thought I maybe should have done it in the Spring.
  #7  
Old 19-03-2008, 05:09 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 185
Default how to grow hawthorn from a cutting?

Stuart Noble says...
David in Normandy wrote:
Stuart Noble says...
David in Normandy wrote:

I too tried hawthorn from cuttings many years ago and
didn't get a single one to root. Also tried holly without
success. However, I normally have good success with other
hedging shrubs such as pyracanthus - I've grown cuttings
for an entire hedgerow from a single plant.

Is there a best time?


I usually take my cuttings in Autumn from semi-ripe wood.
The bits that root the best tend to be strong fresh growth
but not the thin green shoots. I take lots of cuttings and
ram them all into an 8 inch pot with a mixture of garden
soil and sand in. The cuttings themselves are around 6 to 8
inches long and it tear off all leaves and side shoots
below a couple at the top - leather gloves are useful for
this - just run your fingers from top to bottom in one
swift motion tearing the leaves, spines and side shoots
off. This is just a guess but I think tearing is better
than trimming and may encourage the plant to root better.
Anyway I bury most of the cutting below the surface - the
more leaf nodes buried the more chance it will root from
one of them. Shoots torn off giving heel cuttings are also
good.
Just leave the pot in semi shade. At the side of an East
facing wall is good. Water the pot occasionally in Summer
or dry weather so it never completely dries out. By the
following Autumn tip the pot out and prick out the ones
with roots into separate pots.


Thanks, David. I did more or less what you're suggesting last Autumn but
without success. Thought I maybe should have done it in the Spring.


Perhaps you used the growth that was too young and flimsy?
I find the best shoots for cuttings are those that are
starting to put out side shoots themselves while still
being only semi-ripe wood. Similarly I avoid old wood as
that doesn't seem to readily root either.
--
David in Normandy.
To e-mail you must include the password FROG on the
subject line, or it will be automatically deleted.
  #8  
Old 01-03-2011, 02:42 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2011
Posts: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David in Normandy[_7_] View Post
Stuart Noble says...
David in Normandy wrote:
Stuart Noble says...
David in Normandy wrote:

I too tried hawthorn from cuttings many years ago and
didn't get a single one to root. Also tried holly without
success. However, I normally have good success with other
hedging shrubs such as pyracanthus - I've grown cuttings
for an entire hedgerow from a single plant.

Is there a best time?


I usually take my cuttings in Autumn from semi-ripe wood.
The bits that root the best tend to be strong fresh growth
but not the thin green shoots. I take lots of cuttings and
ram them all into an 8 inch pot with a mixture of garden
soil and sand in. The cuttings themselves are around 6 to 8
inches long and it tear off all leaves and side shoots
below a couple at the top - leather gloves are useful for
this - just run your fingers from top to bottom in one
swift motion tearing the leaves, spines and side shoots
off. This is just a guess but I think tearing is better
than trimming and may encourage the plant to root better.
Anyway I bury most of the cutting below the surface - the
more leaf nodes buried the more chance it will root from
one of them. Shoots torn off giving heel cuttings are also
good.
Just leave the pot in semi shade. At the side of an East
facing wall is good. Water the pot occasionally in Summer
or dry weather so it never completely dries out. By the
following Autumn tip the pot out and prick out the ones
with roots into separate pots.


Thanks, David. I did more or less what you're suggesting last Autumn but
without success. Thought I maybe should have done it in the Spring.


Perhaps you used the growth that was too young and flimsy?
I find the best shoots for cuttings are those that are
starting to put out side shoots themselves while still
being only semi-ripe wood. Similarly I avoid old wood as
that doesn't seem to readily root either.
--
David in Normandy.
To e-mail you must include the password FROG on the
subject line, or it will be automatically deleted.
Hello David,

Well I have grown Hawthorne from bare root cuttings and there are a few important points to remember when doing this.
firstly the hawthorn is cut in Spring when it is in bud only, but not once it has gone to leaf.
secondly you have to be prepared to water the root cuttings for every day for the first few weeks after it had got leaves on. this is because the leaves are creating energy and this makes the wood put out roots which need the water to encourage them.
thirdly you must firm the bare cutting in the soil well so it gets a good contact with the earth.

Good Luck.

David
 




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