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Rhubarb: transplanting advice



 
 
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  #1  
Old 01-09-2008, 01:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
jal
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Posts: 9
Default Rhubarb: transplanting advice

Anyone got advice for sharing a rhubarb plant?

3 or 4 colleagues at work expressed an interest when I offered to split
and share our giant rhubarb plant.

I split off some roots about 4 weeks ago and planted them in large pots,
in a mix of soil, all-purpose compost, and a smidgin of 6X.

The resulting plants *seem* ok, in that the couple of leaves that were
attached remain reasonably healthy looking, though no new shoots have
appeared. (But yes, I know rhubarb is on the way out by this time of
year.)

I'm going to pass on these pots in a few days, but I'm wondering if my
colleagues will ultimately be disappointed: does anyone have any further
comments on what I should do or should have done?


Last question: can rhubarb be grown successfully in a pot (one colleague
asked).

cheers
john
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  #2  
Old 01-09-2008, 01:12 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1
Default Rhubarb: transplanting advice



"jal" wrote in message
...
Anyone got advice for sharing a rhubarb plant?

3 or 4 colleagues at work expressed an interest when I offered to split
and share our giant rhubarb plant.

I split off some roots about 4 weeks ago and planted them in large pots,
in a mix of soil, all-purpose compost, and a smidgin of 6X.

The resulting plants *seem* ok, in that the couple of leaves that were
attached remain reasonably healthy looking, though no new shoots have
appeared. (But yes, I know rhubarb is on the way out by this time of
year.)

I'm going to pass on these pots in a few days, but I'm wondering if my
colleagues will ultimately be disappointed: does anyone have any further
comments on what I should do or should have done?


Last question: can rhubarb be grown successfully in a pot (one colleague
asked).

cheers
john


Ideally you should have done the process after the leaves had died back so
that the plant was dormant, or as dormant as they get. . Then you split it
up making sure that each bit has at least one growing point. I wouldn't have
thought a pot would have enough water retention to support a rhubarb but
there's only one way to find out. They are pretty tough I expect yours will
be ok but they won't really get going properly until next year


--
Rowdens Reservoir Allotments Association
www.rraa.moonfruit.com
Feed the soil, save the planet

  #3  
Old 01-09-2008, 01:42 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 820
Default Rhubarb: transplanting advice

The message

from jal contains these words:

Anyone got advice for sharing a rhubarb plant?


3 or 4 colleagues at work expressed an interest when I offered to split
and share our giant rhubarb plant.


Last question: can rhubarb be grown successfully in a pot (one colleague
asked).


I moved this question to the top for reasons which will become obvious.

Forget growing rhubarb (properly) in a pot, unless you have one half as
deep again as a dustbin, and twice the diameter. You might - just
*MIGHT* get away with it in a big plastic dustbin, but expect to be
disappointed with the results.

I split off some roots about 4 weeks ago and planted them in large pots,
in a mix of soil, all-purpose compost, and a smidgin of 6X.


You split off the outside coronets from the crown, and (generally) throw
the middle away.

However, you can replant it and force it next spring if you have the room.

The resulting plants *seem* ok, in that the couple of leaves that were
attached remain reasonably healthy looking, though no new shoots have
appeared. (But yes, I know rhubarb is on the way out by this time of
year.)


I'm going to pass on these pots in a few days, but I'm wondering if my
colleagues will ultimately be disappointed: does anyone have any further
comments on what I should do or should have done?


The plants should be OK.

To get really satisfactory rhubarb, first dig a hole two feet by two
feet and four feet deep.

Get old leather, woollens, etc. (after jumble sales is a good source)
and from the butchers or your stockpot, old bones. Put all these in the
bottom of your pit: they will slowly release nutrients into the soil.

Another good source of slow-release fertiliser is hair clippings from
the barber.

As you replace the soil in the pit, mix it thoroughly with well-rotted
compost and/or manure, and bonemeal (Blood, fish and bone is even
better).

You will end up with a small mountain... Dig a deepish crater in the
top and plant the crown. Leave a substantial rim round the crater, 'cos
rhubarb really likes a *LOT* of water.

Water the crown in, then keep adding water, it is difficult to overdo it.

It is *VERY IMPORTANT* not to pull a single stalk during the first year
after transplanting. If you do, you *WILL* weaken the crown and the
yield will be reduced, and it is unlikely to properly recover.

--
Rusty
Direct reply to: horrid dot squeak snailything zetnet point co period uk
Separator in search of a sig
  #4  
Old 01-09-2008, 04:05 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 762
Default Rhubarb: transplanting advice

On Mon, 1 Sep 2008 13:42:27 +0100, Rusty Hinge 2
wrote:


It is *VERY IMPORTANT* not to pull a single stalk during the first year
after transplanting. If you do, you *WILL* weaken the crown and the
yield will be reduced, and it is unlikely to properly recover.



You seem to know your onions (ok ok rhubarb) - I've got a plant that's
been growing all year (Well since it was planted) and it's look pretty
good. What do I do now? Do I just let it die down?

--
http://www.freedeliveryuk.co.uk
http://www.holidayunder100.co.uk
  #5  
Old 01-09-2008, 05:50 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1
Default Rhubarb: transplanting advice



"mogga" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 1 Sep 2008 13:42:27 +0100, Rusty Hinge 2
wrote:


It is *VERY IMPORTANT* not to pull a single stalk during the first year
after transplanting. If you do, you *WILL* weaken the crown and the
yield will be reduced, and it is unlikely to properly recover.



You seem to know your onions (ok ok rhubarb) - I've got a plant that's
been growing all year (Well since it was planted) and it's look pretty
good. What do I do now? Do I just let it die down?

--
http://www.freedeliveryuk.co.uk
http://www.holidayunder100.co.uk


Yes and then give it plenty of muck

  #6  
Old 01-09-2008, 10:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 820
Default Rhubarb: transplanting advice

The message
from mogga contains these words:
On Mon, 1 Sep 2008 13:42:27 +0100, Rusty Hinge 2
wrote:



It is *VERY IMPORTANT* not to pull a single stalk during the first year
after transplanting. If you do, you *WILL* weaken the crown and the
yield will be reduced, and it is unlikely to properly recover.



You seem to know your onions (ok ok rhubarb) - I've got a plant that's
been growing all year (Well since it was planted) and it's look pretty
good. What do I do now? Do I just let it die down?


Yes. Let it draw back any nutrients left in the leaves, and it will use
them to dispose of waste products.

It'll look really untidy and horrid - like stewed rhubarb with leaves,
but just fold them over the crown and later, mulch, and if you want it
to start early, cover it in cold weather with something like straw or
bark chippings. (Not bubble-wrap, as it can get rotten underneath.)

Carefully rake off mulch during sunlight hours in the early spring, and
cover it again at night - if you remember, or have the time/energy.

--
Rusty
Direct reply to: horrid dot squeak snailything zetnet point co period uk
Separator in search of a sig
 




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