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Best time to prune / cut back overgrown Cape Fuschia ?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 27-09-2008, 11:21 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 23
Default Best time to prune / cut back overgrown Cape Fuschia ?

Hello,

I managed to grow a rather large Cape Fuschia in my garden and it has
reached a height of over 1.5m and a spread of about 1m. The plant is
hardy and remained in leaf throughout last winter. The problem is that
in its current state it is crowding out the surrounding plants. I was
wondering should I cut it back slightly now ( just before the onset of
winter) and then give it the hard pruning next spring ? I am concerned
for the plants in its close vicinity which flower in late spring. If
cutting it back now is a viable option how far should I cut ? I am
worried about the Peony which is directly behind it and which usually
flowers in May.

Thanks,
UC
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  #3  
Old 27-09-2008, 07:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 4,789
Default Best time to prune / cut back overgrown Cape Fuschia ?


"Sacha" wrote...
after "Uncle-C" wrote:

I managed to grow a rather large Cape Fuschia in my garden and it has
reached a height of over 1.5m and a spread of about 1m. The plant is
hardy and remained in leaf throughout last winter. The problem is that
in its current state it is crowding out the surrounding plants. I was
wondering should I cut it back slightly now ( just before the onset of
winter) and then give it the hard pruning next spring ? I am concerned
for the plants in its close vicinity which flower in late spring. If
cutting it back now is a viable option how far should I cut ? I am
worried about the Peony which is directly behind it and which usually
flowers in May.


This is Phygelius capensis, not a Fuchsia at all but it really is a lovely
plant and comes through the winter with us here, too. Cut back finished
flower stalks or cut it back to just above where you can see new growth
starting on the stems in early spring, leaving about 8" or so of stem. In
your case, if there is danger of frost, I'd do the latter, leaving the
present growth on it as some form of winter protection. My personal
favourite is P. Moonraker.

I find these almost invasive and have to chop them back ruthlessly, to
about half their growth, after they have flowered so they stay at the size I
want. One grows rampant right under a tree, it does get sunlight as the tree
crown is quite high. They also send out runners that root in the borders
where they touch the soil and these I chop off and compost but you can use
them for propagation if you want more.
From that you will gather layering is a good method of increasing your
stock.

(in the Thames Valley)
--
Regards
Bob Hobden






  #4  
Old 27-09-2008, 10:30 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 166
Default Best time to prune / cut back overgrown Cape Fuschia ?

Bob Hobden wrote:
"Sacha" wrote...
after "Uncle-C" wrote:

I managed to grow a rather large Cape Fuschia in my garden and it has
reached a height of over 1.5m and a spread of about 1m. The plant is
hardy and remained in leaf throughout last winter. The problem is that
in its current state it is crowding out the surrounding plants. I was
wondering should I cut it back slightly now ( just before the onset of
winter) and then give it the hard pruning next spring ? I am concerned
for the plants in its close vicinity which flower in late spring. If
cutting it back now is a viable option how far should I cut ? I am
worried about the Peony which is directly behind it and which usually
flowers in May.


This is Phygelius capensis, not a Fuchsia at all but it really is a lovely
plant and comes through the winter with us here, too. Cut back finished
flower stalks or cut it back to just above where you can see new growth
starting on the stems in early spring, leaving about 8" or so of stem. In
your case, if there is danger of frost, I'd do the latter, leaving the
present growth on it as some form of winter protection. My personal
favourite is P. Moonraker.

I find these almost invasive and have to chop them back ruthlessly, to
about half their growth, after they have flowered so they stay at the size I
want. One grows rampant right under a tree, it does get sunlight as the tree
crown is quite high. They also send out runners that root in the borders
where they touch the soil and these I chop off and compost but you can use
them for propagation if you want more.
From that you will gather layering is a good method of increasing your
stock.

(in the Thames Valley)


Ours are almost as vigorous but never flower. Any ideas as to what we
could be doing wrong ?


Thanks Paul
(also in Thames valley)

--
CTC Right to Ride Rep. for Richmond upon Thames
  #5  
Old 28-09-2008, 12:42 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,789
Default Best time to prune / cut back overgrown Cape Fuschia ?


"Paul Luton" wrote Bob Hobden wrote:
"Sacha" wrote...
after "Uncle-C" wrote:

I managed to grow a rather large Cape Fuschia in my garden and it has
reached a height of over 1.5m and a spread of about 1m. The plant is
hardy and remained in leaf throughout last winter. The problem is that
in its current state it is crowding out the surrounding plants. I was
wondering should I cut it back slightly now ( just before the onset of
winter) and then give it the hard pruning next spring ? I am concerned
for the plants in its close vicinity which flower in late spring. If
cutting it back now is a viable option how far should I cut ? I am
worried about the Peony which is directly behind it and which usually
flowers in May.


This is Phygelius capensis, not a Fuchsia at all but it really is a
lovely
plant and comes through the winter with us here, too. Cut back finished
flower stalks or cut it back to just above where you can see new growth
starting on the stems in early spring, leaving about 8" or so of stem.
In
your case, if there is danger of frost, I'd do the latter, leaving the
present growth on it as some form of winter protection. My personal
favourite is P. Moonraker.

I find these almost invasive and have to chop them back ruthlessly, to
about half their growth, after they have flowered so they stay at the
size I want. One grows rampant right under a tree, it does get sunlight
as the tree crown is quite high. They also send out runners that root in
the borders where they touch the soil and these I chop off and compost
but you can use them for propagation if you want more.
From that you will gather layering is a good method of increasing your
stock.

(in the Thames Valley)


Ours are almost as vigorous but never flower. Any ideas as to what we
could be doing wrong ?


Pruning to keep them tidy in the spring/summer and thereby pruning off the
flowering stems? :-)

I prune hard in autumn back to where I want the plant to grow from and then
don't do anything until the flowers die when I prune again back to buds
below the flowers and they reflower from there.

--
Regards
Bob Hobden



--
Regards
Bob Hobden



  #6  
Old 28-09-2008, 09:39 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,181
Default Best time to prune / cut back overgrown Cape Fuschia ?

In article ,
says...
Bob Hobden wrote:
"Sacha" wrote...
after "Uncle-C" wrote:

I managed to grow a rather large Cape Fuschia in my garden and it has
reached a height of over 1.5m and a spread of about 1m. The plant is
hardy and remained in leaf throughout last winter. The problem is that
in its current state it is crowding out the surrounding plants. I was
wondering should I cut it back slightly now ( just before the onset of
winter) and then give it the hard pruning next spring ? I am concerned
for the plants in its close vicinity which flower in late spring. If
cutting it back now is a viable option how far should I cut ? I am
worried about the Peony which is directly behind it and which usually
flowers in May.


This is Phygelius capensis, not a Fuchsia at all but it really is a lovely
plant and comes through the winter with us here, too. Cut back finished
flower stalks or cut it back to just above where you can see new growth
starting on the stems in early spring, leaving about 8" or so of stem. In
your case, if there is danger of frost, I'd do the latter, leaving the
present growth on it as some form of winter protection. My personal
favourite is P. Moonraker.

I find these almost invasive and have to chop them back ruthlessly, to
about half their growth, after they have flowered so they stay at the size I
want. One grows rampant right under a tree, it does get sunlight as the tree
crown is quite high. They also send out runners that root in the borders
where they touch the soil and these I chop off and compost but you can use
them for propagation if you want more.
From that you will gather layering is a good method of increasing your
stock.

(in the Thames Valley)


Ours are almost as vigorous but never flower. Any ideas as to what we
could be doing wrong ?


Thanks Paul
(also in Thames valley)


The most common reason for these not flowering is the attention of the
"Figwort weavil" a small native weavil, black and white in colour, does
little apparent damage but feeds on the shoot tips and prevents
flowering. either spray in early summer or cut the tops of the shoots off
and burn them, the plant will then flower on the side shoots.
--
Charlie Pridham, Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk
Holders of national collections of Clematis viticella cultivars and
Lapageria rosea
 




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