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Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 08-02-2009, 12:45 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 8
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

Hi,
I've got a mini lemon tree and I'd like to know if its fruit is
edible. I don't know the scientific, or even correct, name for the
tree so I've posted a picture of it at http://www.paulkaye.net/minilemontree.jpg
Is the fruit edible and would I use it like normal lemons?
Thanks for your time,
Paul
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  #2  
Old 08-02-2009, 01:10 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,097
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

The message

from Paul contains these words:

Hi,
I've got a mini lemon tree and I'd like to know if its fruit is
edible. I don't know the scientific, or even correct, name for the
tree so I've posted a picture of it at
http://www.paulkaye.net/minilemontree.jpg
Is the fruit edible and would I use it like normal lemons?
Thanks for your time,


Well, it looks like citrus.

If it is, then yes. Try microwave marmalade...[]

envy

Where did you get it?

/envy

[] Recipes often in microwave cook-books. Keeps much more flavour,
uses less sugar, but has to be kept refrigerated.[]

[] Unless you are very adept at sealing jars while they are still
gently simmering. Then refrigerate after opening.

--
Rusty
Direct reply to: horrid dot squeak snailything zetnet point co period uk
Separator in search of a sig
  #3  
Old 08-02-2009, 02:01 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,439
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

On 8/2/09 12:45, in article
, "Paul"
wrote:

Hi,
I've got a mini lemon tree and I'd like to know if its fruit is
edible. I don't know the scientific, or even correct, name for the
tree so I've posted a picture of it at
http://www.paulkaye.net/minilemontree.jpg
Is the fruit edible and would I use it like normal lemons?
Thanks for your time,
Paul


Is it Meyer's Lemon? Do a Google Image search for those and see if it looks
or sounds familiar. If so, you use it like any other lemon but the fruit
isn't quite as tart and is pink. There's a very good pudding recipe for
using Meyer's Lemons.
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
3 large eggs, separated
1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/4 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice
2 tablespoons fresh regular lemon juice
2 tablespoons finely grated Meyer lemon peel
3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons whole milk

1/4 teaspoon salt
Whipped cream (optional)



Preheat oven to 350F. Butter six 3/4-cup custard cups or ramekins. Combine
1/2 cup sugar, egg yolks, flour, lemon juice, and lemon peel in large bowl;
whisk until well blended. Whisk in milk.

Using electric mixer, beat egg whites and salt in medium bowl until frothy.
Gradually add remaining 2 tablespoons sugar and beat until soft peaks form.
Fold beaten egg whites into lemon mixture in 2 additions. Divide mixture
among prepared custard cups. Place custard cups in roasting pan. Pour enough
hot water into roasting pan to come halfway up sides of custard cups. Bake
puddings until tops are golden and spring back when lightly touched, about
30 minutes. Remove cups from water. Serve warm or cold with whipped cream,
if desired.

Makes 6 servings.

--
Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon
Perennials & shrubs online

  #4  
Old 08-02-2009, 02:20 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 297
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

On Sun, 8 Feb 2009 04:45:12 -0800 (PST), Paul
wrote:

Hi,
I've got a mini lemon tree and I'd like to know if its fruit is
edible. I don't know the scientific, or even correct, name for the
tree so I've posted a picture of it at http://www.paulkaye.net/minilemontree.jpg
Is the fruit edible and would I use it like normal lemons?
Thanks for your time,
Paul


It looks like a Meyer lemon. They are a bit smaller than "normal"
lemons. In my experience they can't stand very cold temperature for
more than a few days. They taste quite good raw.

Steve

--
Neural Planner Software Ltd http://www.NPSL1.com

Neural network applications for Windows
  #5  
Old 09-02-2009, 11:28 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2004
Location: Torquay S. Devon
Posts: 478
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

It's not a mini-lemon, but something rather more worthwhile - a
'limequat' and probably 'Eustis', which is the most popular. This is
a hybrid between a key lime and kumquat that can be used unripe as a
lime and fully ripe as a lemon. The fruit is decidedly edible and can
be used for flavouring drinks as well as normal culinary purposes.
The thin rind is relatively sweet when the fruit is fully ripe and it
makes a very delicious marmalade. As to hardiness it is possibly more
borderline than 'Meyers', but has grown and fruited well here in S.
Devon for several years. That plant looks a tad yellow and devoid of
leaves though. A good shot of magnesium sulphate in spring followed
by regular applications of Chempak No2 (every 3 weeks throughout
summer and early autumn) will soon put it to rights. Nice thing to
have.
  #6  
Old 09-02-2009, 08:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 8
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

On Feb 9, 1:28*pm, Dave Poole wrote:
It's not a mini-lemon, but something rather more worthwhile - a
'limequat' and probably 'Eustis', which is the most popular. *This is
a hybrid between a key lime and kumquat that can be used unripe as a
lime and fully ripe as a lemon. *The fruit is decidedly edible and can
be used for flavouring drinks as well as normal culinary purposes.
The thin rind is relatively sweet when the fruit is fully ripe and it
makes a very delicious marmalade. *As to hardiness it is possibly more
borderline than 'Meyers', but has grown and fruited well here in S.
Devon for several years. *That plant looks a tad yellow and devoid of
leaves though. *A good shot of magnesium sulphate in spring followed
by regular applications of Chempak No2 (every 3 weeks throughout
summer and early autumn) will soon put it to rights. Nice thing to
have.


Hi all - thank you for your time and input!

Hi Dave,
Thanks - I just looked up limequat on Wikipedia and there it is!
Sounds great! I've got about 3 kg of fruit so I'll be making
marmalade. I'll give the magnesium sulphate a go next month - thanks
for that tip!

Hi Stephen, Hi Sacha,
The fruit is actually only 2-3cm in diameter. I looked up Meyer lemons
as that's what often came up when I originally Googled "mini lemons"
but I'm sure that's not it. Thanks for your time, though. I might try
your pudding recipe anyway!

Hi Rusty,
Thanks for your input. Sounds like it is edible and the marmalade idea
sounds great. I got mine in Israel (been here for a few years now -
this tree is about 3 years old and has given about 2 kg of fruit each
year) but, according to Wikipedia at least, it's also grown in the UK.

Thanks again,
Paul


  #7  
Old 09-02-2009, 10:48 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,097
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

The message
from Paul contains these words:

Thanks for your input. Sounds like it is edible and the marmalade idea
sounds great.


My mother used to make microwave jam - keeps its colour and fresh flavour.

I got mine in Israel (been here for a few years now -
this tree is about 3 years old and has given about 2 kg of fruit each
year) but, according to Wikipedia at least, it's also grown in the UK.


Yes, under glass, I'd think.

I've found a nice expensive place that sells them - sometimes - average
price of a small tree is thirty quid.

I'll do a bit more searching.

--
Rusty
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  #8  
Old 10-02-2009, 05:17 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 8
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

My mother used to make microwave jam - keeps its colour and fresh flavour.

That's what I'll probably do - sounds great.

I've found a nice expensive place that sells them - sometimes - average
price of a small tree is thirty quid.


Good luck!
  #9  
Old 10-02-2009, 10:22 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,097
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

The message

from Paul contains these words:
My mother used to make microwave jam - keeps its colour and fresh flavour.


That's what I'll probably do - sounds great.


I've found a nice expensive place that sells them - sometimes - average
price of a small tree is thirty quid.


Good luck!


Thanks...

--
Rusty
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  #10  
Old 10-02-2009, 04:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2004
Location: Torquay S. Devon
Posts: 478
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

Rusty wrote:
I've found a nice expensive place that sells them - sometimes - average
price of a small tree is thirty quid.
I'll do a bit more searching.


Erm, just to make you a bit envious - I bought mine from my local
greengrocer (he often buys in a few interesting things) and paid the
princely sum of 4.00 each for a pair. One went up to the Midlands,
but failed to survive the winter and the other is here.

  #12  
Old 10-02-2009, 07:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,097
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

The message

from Dave Poole contains these words:
Rusty wrote:


I've found a nice expensive place that sells them - sometimes - average
price of a small tree is thirty quid.
I'll do a bit more searching.


Erm, just to make you a bit envious - I bought mine from my local
greengrocer (he often buys in a few interesting things) and paid the
princely sum of 4.00 each for a pair. One went up to the Midlands,
but failed to survive the winter and the other is here.


Could you persuade your greengrocer to start a branch here?

Not only would he sell me the odd 'interesting thing' but he'd sell me
veg as well. We have two shops in the village which sell veg (three
shops in all, but one only sells stamps, sweets and stationery).

The butcher keeps veg in pretty good order, but the choice is - er -
limited, and the other shop has veg rotting in a dark corner.

He'd do business...

--
Rusty
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  #13  
Old 11-02-2009, 09:42 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2004
Location: Torquay S. Devon
Posts: 478
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

Sacha wrote:

I found a place the other day that does red lime trees, a mere 350! *David,
did you get an email from me about the limequat?


Replied to earlier Sacha. The problem is that almost any Citrus
appears to attract a premium and getting hold of them for a reasonable
price is quite difficult. However, only offering high priced examples
does seem to be very short sighted and severely limits the potential
market. A price of 20 - 30 for young, but fruiting sized plants
seems to be the norm, although I can't imagine folks being in a great
hurry to buy them. The few nurseries that grow them probably only
prop a few because they don't sell. They don't sell because they are
too expensive and due to low stocks, prices remain high. It's a
downward spiral ultimately leading to few if any plants being sold at
all :-(

To my mind, the Eustis or Tavares limequats are the perfect Citrus for
the amateur. They are highly ornamental, very easy to grow,
relatively trouble free (though you need to watch out for scale) and
reliable fruiters from a very young age. They are compact growers,
make very handsome specimens that only need to be overwintered
somewhere bright and frost-free. Once the frosts have passed, they
can go out onto a sunny patio, where they will flower (highly
fragrant), set fruit and be ready for picking by late autumn. In a
reasonable summer, you may also get flowers in July and again in
August, so fruiting can be successional. From grower's point of view,
they can be grown from cuttings (grafts give bigger plants, but are
not essential) and do not pose especial problems in terms of space or
heat required. Someone needs to make a killing with these and do a
'Daily Mail' on them - 10.25 each or 19.00 a pair inc p&p! I need
to rent some greenhouse space fast!


  #14  
Old 11-02-2009, 09:58 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,439
Default Mini lemon tree - edible fruit?

On 11/2/09 09:42, in article
, "Dave
Poole" wrote:

Sacha wrote:

I found a place the other day that does red lime trees, a mere 350! *David,
did you get an email from me about the limequat?


Replied to earlier Sacha.


Got it, thank you.

The problem is that almost any Citrus
appears to attract a premium and getting hold of them for a reasonable
price is quite difficult. However, only offering high priced examples
does seem to be very short sighted and severely limits the potential
market. A price of 20 - 30 for young, but fruiting sized plants
seems to be the norm, although I can't imagine folks being in a great
hurry to buy them. The few nurseries that grow them probably only
prop a few because they don't sell. They don't sell because they are
too expensive and due to low stocks, prices remain high. It's a
downward spiral ultimately leading to few if any plants being sold at
all :-(


I don't understand the need for such very high prices because they seem to
prop pretty easily, although they do need a bit of 'bringing on' in a
careful sort of way. They seem to flower and fruit pretty quickly, too.
I've seen Citrus medica on sale at 4' high for 160 which is simply
iniquitous, IMO and I'm unable to see how it's justified.

To my mind, the Eustis or Tavares limequats are the perfect Citrus for
the amateur. They are highly ornamental, very easy to grow,
relatively trouble free (though you need to watch out for scale) and
reliable fruiters from a very young age. They are compact growers,
make very handsome specimens that only need to be overwintered
somewhere bright and frost-free. Once the frosts have passed, they
can go out onto a sunny patio, where they will flower (highly
fragrant), set fruit and be ready for picking by late autumn. In a
reasonable summer, you may also get flowers in July and again in
August, so fruiting can be successional. From grower's point of view,
they can be grown from cuttings (grafts give bigger plants, but are
not essential) and do not pose especial problems in terms of space or
heat required. Someone needs to make a killing with these and do a
'Daily Mail' on them - 10.25 each or 19.00 a pair inc p&p! I need
to rent some greenhouse space fast!


Well, for a couple of rooted cuttings........ ;-)) I wish we had more
space here and then you could. We're moving into that 'crammed to the hilt'
part of the year, slowly but surely. And yes, Ray has propagated many of
our lemons himself from the plants I bought him a few years ago. The only
drawback I can see with the two C. medicas is that we have to put signs up
asking people not to touch the fruits! They're so extraordinary that
everyone thinks they're fake and just has to check it out and then of
course, they fall off the plant if they're ripening. Mind you, When
'Buddha's Hand' does that I whisk them off to the house and let them release
their gorgeous scent in a bowl in the hall!

--
Sacha
http://www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon
Perennials & shrubs online

 




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