A Gardening forum. GardenBanter.co.uk

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » GardenBanter.co.uk forum » Regional Gardening Discussions » United Kingdom
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

TURP slurp



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 18-02-2012, 09:33 PM posted to uk.legal,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.driving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default TURP slurp

Rumours that my wife needed four men in white coats armed with cattle
prods to drive me into Guildford's Nuffield hospital last Tuesday for my
TURP operation are grossly exaggerated. A monstrous calumny. Two men
were enough. I am not a coward; I can stand any amount of pain except my
own.

In fact there wasn't any pain at all. Having had all the pre-op
assessment tests, on arrival at the Nuffield my wife and I were shown to
a very swish private room. I was introduced to the theatrical ward
nursing support team who came trooping in. The warmth and brisk
efficiency of the Nuffield stuck me immediately. I was gowned and into
bed and was trundled down to the theatre within three hours of
admission.

I woke up in recovery an hour later feeling fine but sporting an
enormous catheter sprouting out of me with several pipes and valves
disappearing into it. I've been stuck with a wretched catheter and a
urine bag strapped to my leg for nearly five months but not a catheter
as big or complicated as this monster although I had been told what to
expect. Nevertheless I was euphoric: thanks to the remarkable skill of
Stephen Langley, Professor of Urology at the University of Surrey, I had
come through the dreaded TURP procedure without a hint of pain or even
slight discomfort.

For 24-hours, all of Wednesday, copious quantities of water were pumped
in and out of me to flush my system. The nurses had a struggle hoisting
three litre bags of water onto the stand. The stuff coming out of me
started off as bright red Burgundy! Yuck. I even had a drip feed into a
vein. I was at the centre of a complex irrigation system which ended on
Wednesday afternoon when everything was running clear. On Thursday at
midnight the surgical catheter was removed. For the first time in
nearly five months I was without external plumbing and a collection bag.
I was on my own and drifted off to sleep, very much concerned that I'd
wake up in a urine-drenched bed despite the assurances of Professor
Langley that everything would be fine. My misplaced misgivings were
because I'd hadn't exercised control over my bladder for several months
and was convinced I'd lost the 'knack'.

My fears were unfounded. I was woken by an urge to pee and, to my joy, I
could pee normally. It was bliss that I find hard to describe. On Friday
morning Professor Langley said I could go home that afternoon with the
advice to take life very easy for a couple of weeks. My wife collected
me and I'm now back at home being spoilt and pampered outrageously by
her. She is a wonderful nurse. I'm relieved that she will no longer have
to come creeping into my room in the early hours to check my bag and
empty it if necessary.

Following so close on the heels of my stay in the Royal Surrey, my three
days in the Nuffield hospital were a real eye-opener into how a hospital
should be run. The atmosphere was so different. The Nuffield's staff
enjoy high morale and seem to operate under excellent management whereas
the Royal Surrey's staff, although dedicated and conscious -- they can't
be faulted for that -- nevertheless are working under a miserable cloud
of uncertainty about their future. They deserve better.

Also the Nuffield take MRSA very seriously. Their daily cleaning
schedule is incredibly rigorous. To the best of my knowledge they've
never had a case of MRSA. For someone of my age who has experienced the
misery of the wretched bug, the peace of mind that came from knowing
that I was going to a hospital where it was unknown made the high cost
of going private well worthwhile.

Being home is wonderful. Although the care I received at the Nuffield
was above reproach, it's lovely to snooze the day away without taps on
the door every thirty minutes or so for blood pressure tests etc. The
slight stinging I'd experienced on Friday when urinating was gone by
Saturday.

Another hurdle out of the way. I'm getting there.


Ads
  #2  
Old 18-02-2012, 09:46 PM posted to uk.legal,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.driving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default TURP slurp


"Mr. Bean" wrote in message
...

http://myreader.co.uk/msg/11042772.aspx

  #3  
Old 18-02-2012, 10:00 PM posted to uk.legal,uk.rec.gardening,uk.rec.driving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default TURP slurp

On 18/02/2012 21:33, Mr. Bean wrote:
Rumours that my wife needed four men in white coats armed with cattle
prods to drive me into Guildford's Nuffield hospital last Tuesday for my
TURP operation are grossly exaggerated. A monstrous calumny. Two men
were enough. I am not a coward; I can stand any amount of pain except my
own.

In fact there wasn't any pain at all. Having had all the pre-op
assessment tests, on arrival at the Nuffield my wife and I were shown to
a very swish private room. I was introduced to the theatrical ward
nursing support team who came trooping in. The warmth and brisk
efficiency of the Nuffield stuck me immediately. I was gowned and into
bed and was trundled down to the theatre within three hours of
admission.

I woke up in recovery an hour later feeling fine but sporting an
enormous catheter sprouting out of me with several pipes and valves
disappearing into it. I've been stuck with a wretched catheter and a
urine bag strapped to my leg for nearly five months but not a catheter
as big or complicated as this monster although I had been told what to
expect. Nevertheless I was euphoric: thanks to the remarkable skill of
Stephen Langley, Professor of Urology at the University of Surrey, I had
come through the dreaded TURP procedure without a hint of pain or even
slight discomfort.

For 24-hours, all of Wednesday, copious quantities of water were pumped
in and out of me to flush my system. The nurses had a struggle hoisting
three litre bags of water onto the stand. The stuff coming out of me
started off as bright red Burgundy! Yuck. I even had a drip feed into a
vein. I was at the centre of a complex irrigation system which ended on
Wednesday afternoon when everything was running clear. On Thursday at
midnight the surgical catheter was removed. For the first time in
nearly five months I was without external plumbing and a collection bag.
I was on my own and drifted off to sleep, very much concerned that I'd
wake up in a urine-drenched bed despite the assurances of Professor
Langley that everything would be fine. My misplaced misgivings were
because I'd hadn't exercised control over my bladder for several months
and was convinced I'd lost the 'knack'.

My fears were unfounded. I was woken by an urge to pee and, to my joy, I
could pee normally. It was bliss that I find hard to describe. On Friday
morning Professor Langley said I could go home that afternoon with the
advice to take life very easy for a couple of weeks. My wife collected
me and I'm now back at home being spoilt and pampered outrageously by
her. She is a wonderful nurse. I'm relieved that she will no longer have
to come creeping into my room in the early hours to check my bag and
empty it if necessary.

Following so close on the heels of my stay in the Royal Surrey, my three
days in the Nuffield hospital were a real eye-opener into how a hospital
should be run. The atmosphere was so different. The Nuffield's staff
enjoy high morale and seem to operate under excellent management whereas
the Royal Surrey's staff, although dedicated and conscious -- they can't
be faulted for that -- nevertheless are working under a miserable cloud
of uncertainty about their future. They deserve better.

Also the Nuffield take MRSA very seriously. Their daily cleaning
schedule is incredibly rigorous. To the best of my knowledge they've
never had a case of MRSA. For someone of my age who has experienced the
misery of the wretched bug, the peace of mind that came from knowing
that I was going to a hospital where it was unknown made the high cost
of going private well worthwhile.

Being home is wonderful. Although the care I received at the Nuffield
was above reproach, it's lovely to snooze the day away without taps on
the door every thirty minutes or so for blood pressure tests etc. The
slight stinging I'd experienced on Friday when urinating was gone by
Saturday.

Another hurdle out of the way. I'm getting there.


Congratulations, glad it went well.

Couldn't you have chosen that, or a similar, hospital under the NHS
"choose and book" scheme? I have just done that. Not Nuffield but a
good local private hospital. It is almost like going private. I could
not select the surgeon but I was asked when I wanted the operation and
given a date within my timescale. All appointments happened on time and
there were no crowded waiting areas, just spacious comfort. Blood test,
ECG, no waiting. The surgeon and the nurses had time to explain and
discuss. They try in the large NHS hospitals but the shortage of time
quickly becomes apparent.

All hospitals, including the NHS, seem to take MRSA seriously these days
with pre admittance screening and requirement to use an antimicrobial
body wash. If they can stop it getting in then it won't be caught in
the hospital.

Only problem with using a private hospital is that if anything goes
seriously wrong they cannot handle it. You are blue lighted to the
nearest NHS A&E.


--
Old Codger
e-mail use reply to field

What matters in politics is not what happens, but what you can make
people believe has happened. [Janet Daley 27/8/2003]
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright 2004-2014 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.