A Gardening forum. GardenBanter.co.uk

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » GardenBanter.co.uk forum » Regional Gardening Discussions » United Kingdom
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Codling moth on old apple tree



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 17-02-2017, 03:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Codling moth on old apple tree

We have (due to a leaning tree and a minor fence realignment) inherited a
very old apple tree from next door.

All the fruit are infested with codling moth.

I have read about pheromone traps then spraying (which would have to be
agreed with next door) but wonder how effective this would be with a
heavily infested old tree.

Cleaning and tidying everything which could hide a moth larva over the
winter does not look to be an easy option, especially next door with loads
of trees and shrubs.

Has anyone fought the moth and won?


Cheers


Dave R


--
AMD FX-6300 in GA-990X-Gaming SLI-CF running Windows 7 Pro x64

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

Ads
  #2  
Old 17-02-2017, 04:07 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,262
Default Codling moth on old apple tree

On 17/02/2017 14:37, David wrote:
We have (due to a leaning tree and a minor fence realignment) inherited a
very old apple tree from next door.

All the fruit are infested with codling moth.

I have read about pheromone traps then spraying (which would have to be
agreed with next door) but wonder how effective this would be with a
heavily infested old tree.


The only way to find out is to give it a try. We have some codling moth
on ours but not enough to actually bother spraying.

You just have to remember when eating them that the only thing worse
than a maggot in your apple is a half a maggot in your apple.

Cleaning and tidying everything which could hide a moth larva over the
winter does not look to be an easy option, especially next door with loads
of trees and shrubs.

Has anyone fought the moth and won?


Tidying up the leaf litter will help if you can. On a big old tree I
don't think you can ever win - there are too many nooks and crannies.
But you can perhaps get it down to an acceptable level of losses.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #3  
Old 17-02-2017, 11:53 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,343
Default Codling moth on old apple tree

On 17/02/2017 14:37, David wrote:
We have (due to a leaning tree and a minor fence realignment) inherited a
very old apple tree from next door.

All the fruit are infested with codling moth.

I have read about pheromone traps then spraying (which would have to be
agreed with next door) but wonder how effective this would be with a
heavily infested old tree.

Cleaning and tidying everything which could hide a moth larva over the
winter does not look to be an easy option, especially next door with loads
of trees and shrubs.

Has anyone fought the moth and won?


Cheers


Dave R


Yes the traps cleared it in a season without spraying (we used more than
the recommend amount of traps) you have to keep doing it we replace the
traps at least twice per season.

--
Charlie Pridham
Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright 2004-2017 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.