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What is the best tool to cut this down



 
 
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  #16  
Old 15-03-2017, 05:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 7
Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On 15/03/2017 10:02, Muddymike wrote:
On 14/03/2017 22:39, Jim wrote:
I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?
I don't mind buying some tools like a saw as i would be able to use that
again myself indoors but any gardening tools over 20 i think i'd rather
hire, i do have ladders that go up about 6 foot but wonder what your
thoughts are.
The tree in question is below:
http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...psxr3jwxri.jpg


http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pstaiajdgl.jpg


http://i1376.photobucket.com/albums/...pspi5n41xe.jpg



I would highly recommend you buy or hire a telescopic pole pruning saw
first of all.I have one I bought for around a tenner from Lidl several
years ago. You would be surprised how much you can cut down with one. Be
prepared for a lot of branches to dispose of. And of course wear goggles.

Mike

OK thanks for everyones replies, i do have my own hard hat and goggles
and would be using them, as for my health well 50 and not the fittest
guy in the world, as have seen too many "You've been framed moments" of
people up ladders doing this and screwing it up and putting themselves
in hospital so hopefully i work on the side of caution rather then gun
ho attitute.
My plan is to tackle is little bit at a time, not just go in and hack
the main branches off, I know the car park well and there are very few
cars here during the day so room is not an issue for bits falling into
car park side, neighbours garden is empty bar a kids bike which i would
move to far side of garden, as for the rubbish this is an issue, as we
no longer get garden waste picked up by council for free, but i have
spoken to them and offer a service where you pay 16 and you gt 10 pick
ups of larger items (beds etc) but this also includes garden waste so
ring and book a pick up day so i will pay for that, rather then pay
someone else to dump it in country lane.
I will NOT be climbing the tree that is for sure.
I was looking at hiring (or even buying then selling on) something like this
http://www.argos.co.uk/product/3595330
or
http://www.argos.co.uk/product/6347231

i wanted to stay with electric and away from petrol, the beauty of this
(IMHO) is i can pick away at the tree bit by bit, i was thinking i'd
loose about 30% when selling on which is fine by me.

Jim
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  #17  
Old 15-03-2017, 06:03 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 123
Default What is the best tool to cut this down

In article , luckyjim2000_2000
@yahoo.co.uk says...
I was looking at hiring (or even buying then selling on) something like this
http://www.argos.co.uk/product/3595330
or
http://www.argos.co.uk/product/6347231


It's a chainsaw; don't. Especially as you are unfit, because it takes
a good upper body strength to support that weight on a long pole and
manoevre it safely above your head.

Janet
  #18  
Old 20-03-2017, 12:34 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 127
Default What is the best tool to cut this down

On 15/03/2017 16:51, Jim wrote:
On 15/03/2017 10:02, Muddymike wrote:
On 14/03/2017 22:39, Jim wrote:
I have a neighbour that I'd like to cut his tree down for him, but have
no garden tools myself once i have spoken to him and got his permission
what tool/tools would be best to hire/buy for the job?




I would highly recommend you buy or hire a telescopic pole pruning saw
first of all.I have one I bought for around a tenner from Lidl several
years ago. You would be surprised how much you can cut down with one. Be
prepared for a lot of branches to dispose of. And of course wear goggles.

Mike

OK thanks for everyones replies, i do have my own hard hat and goggles
and would be using them, as for my health well 50 and not the fittest
guy in the world, as have seen too many "You've been framed moments" of


I will NOT be climbing the tree that is for sure.
I was looking at hiring (or even buying then selling on) something like
this
http://www.argos.co.uk/product/3595330
or
http://www.argos.co.uk/product/6347231

i wanted to stay with electric and away from petrol, the beauty of this
(IMHO) is i can pick away at the tree bit by bit, i was thinking i'd
loose about 30% when selling on which is fine by me.

Jim


They are probably the safest form of Chain saw for the user. The angry
end being so far away its very hard to injure yourself, particularly if
the trigger does not have a "lock on" facility.

Its other people that can get hurt. Just make sure any help stands well
back whilst you are wielding the saw.

Don't forget it will most probably need resharpening during the job.
Particularly as trees in gardens often have old hidden nails in them.
Make sure you have the correct file and watch a YouTube video or two on
how to sharpen a chain saw.

Mike
 




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