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Could this be the year of the over wintered figs?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 31-03-2017, 10:37 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 6
Default Could this be the year of the over wintered figs?

One debunked urban myth is that if fig trees produce fruit in the autumn
these should be left on as they provide next year's crop.

So far I have never seen this happen. Second crop Brown Turkey sit around
over winter and gradually die and drop off, and new buds form the next
year's crop.

However this year is unusual in that I seem to have quite a few survivors
on the pot grown tree, and various trees near us that are grown in the
ground also seem to have a large number of over wintered fruit.

Could this be the year?
Probably not.

Oh, and I recall reading somewhere that Brown Turkey is a continuous
cropper but only manages to ripen one crop in the UK; fair enough, but I
also read somewhere that only the first crop is self fertile which seems
illogical.

Call myth busters?

Cheers



Dave R

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  #2  
Old 31-03-2017, 11:20 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,682
Default Could this be the year of the over wintered figs?

On 31/03/17 10:37, David wrote:
One debunked urban myth is that if fig trees produce fruit in the autumn
these should be left on as they provide next year's crop.

So far I have never seen this happen. Second crop Brown Turkey sit around
over winter and gradually die and drop off, and new buds form the next
year's crop.

However this year is unusual in that I seem to have quite a few survivors
on the pot grown tree, and various trees near us that are grown in the
ground also seem to have a large number of over wintered fruit.

Could this be the year?
Probably not.

Oh, and I recall reading somewhere that Brown Turkey is a continuous
cropper but only manages to ripen one crop in the UK; fair enough, but I
also read somewhere that only the first crop is self fertile which seems
illogical.

Call myth busters?

Cheers



Dave R


IIRC, I picked the last couple of Brown Turkey figs in early December,
when they we just about ripe. There were quite a few left on the small
tree, and over the next three months at least half - of varying sizes -
dropped off. But there are still a few medium-sized figs left. As to
whether they will swell and/or ripen towards late spring or early
summer, I really do not know. Somehow, though, I doubt it...

--

Jeff
  #3  
Old 31-03-2017, 04:34 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 202
Default Could this be the year of the over wintered figs?

On Fri, 31 Mar 2017 09:37:59 David wrote:

One debunked urban myth is that if fig trees produce fruit in the autumn
these should be left on as they provide next year's crop.

So far I have never seen this happen. Second crop Brown Turkey sit around
over winter and gradually die and drop off, and new buds form the next
year's crop.

However this year is unusual in that I seem to have quite a few survivors
on the pot grown tree, and various trees near us that are grown in the
ground also seem to have a large number of over wintered fruit.

Could this be the year?
Probably not.


Your observation is interesting - to me, at any rate.

Last year I had quite a lot of overwintered fruit and for the first time
I had a decent crop - about fifty or sixty, maybe more, I lost count.
Always before I've had no more than three of four fruit in total per
year.

This year, although the baby figs are still on the tree, they are
wizened and dead so I doubt that I shall have last year's success this
year.

On another tack. I took some plants that I'd layered about four years
ago and planted them in my French garden. Last week I noticed that one
of them was leaning a bit drunkenly. On examination I discovered that it
had been completely gnawed off from its roots. It looked like a
miniature version of what beavers do to trees when they're building a
dam. I've put some collars on the remaining ones but I don't have a
great deal of hope for them as the gnawing was under soil level.

Disappointing!

David

--
David Rance writing from Caversham, Reading, UK
  #4  
Old 04-04-2017, 08:48 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 14
Default Could this be the year of the over wintered figs?

On 31/03/2017 10:37, David wrote:
One debunked urban myth is that if fig trees produce fruit in the autumn
these should be left on as they provide next year's crop.

So far I have never seen this happen. Second crop Brown Turkey sit around
over winter and gradually die and drop off, and new buds form the next
year's crop.

However this year is unusual in that I seem to have quite a few survivors
on the pot grown tree, and various trees near us that are grown in the
ground also seem to have a large number of over wintered fruit.

Could this be the year?
Probably not.


I dunno, but FWIW my potted Brown Turkey has also got some figs on this
year staying on over the winter for the first time ever.

Perhaps conditions being so mild again were more to its liking.

Oh, and I recall reading somewhere that Brown Turkey is a continuous
cropper but only manages to ripen one crop in the UK; fair enough, but I
also read somewhere that only the first crop is self fertile which seems
illogical.

Call myth busters?


I think getting them ripe might be a challenge at my latitude but I am
game to give it a try. There are some huge riverside fig trees growing
wild in the industrial heartlands that do set fruit but they have pretty
rubbish fruit for the most part neither ripe nor worth eating

Apparently they date from the Victorian era. There is decent sized one
in central Manchester visible looking down from Blackfriars bridge.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
 




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