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Inherited plant



 
 
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  #1  
Old 12-04-2017, 07:56 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 12
Default Inherited plant

Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks

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  #2  
Old 12-04-2017, 07:59 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 12
Default Inherited plant

On 12/04/2017 19:56, Bigus wrote:
Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks


Hmmm attaching that image didn't work. Here it is:

https://unsee.cc/mirezado/
  #3  
Old 12-04-2017, 09:14 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Inherited plant

On 12/04/2017 19:59, Bigus wrote:
On 12/04/2017 19:56, Bigus wrote:
Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks


Hmmm attaching that image didn't work. Here it is:

https://unsee.cc/mirezado/


sigh

OK that link died, this one is allegedly up for one day:

https://unsee.cc/nuroteda/
  #4  
Old 12-04-2017, 10:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,682
Default Inherited plant

On 12/04/17 21:28, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 21:14:35 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 19:59, Bigus wrote:
On 12/04/2017 19:56, Bigus wrote:
Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks

Hmmm attaching that image didn't work. Here it is:

https://unsee.cc/mirezado/


sigh

OK that link died, this one is allegedly up for one day:

https://unsee.cc/nuroteda/


Almost impossible to tell just from that particular picture. When it
flowers, post another picture. Hazarding a guess I'd say a
rhododendron, with a flower bud beginning to swell.


+1 on rhodo, as there aren't too many shrubs with large orange flowers,
although that looks more like a leaf than flower bud. I think there is
the beginning of chlorosis on the leaves, adding to the evidence for a
rhodo.

--

Jeff
  #5  
Old 12-04-2017, 10:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Inherited plant

On 12/04/2017 21:28, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 21:14:35 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 19:59, Bigus wrote:
On 12/04/2017 19:56, Bigus wrote:
Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks

Hmmm attaching that image didn't work. Here it is:

https://unsee.cc/mirezado/


sigh

OK that link died, this one is allegedly up for one day:

https://unsee.cc/nuroteda/


Almost impossible to tell just from that particular picture. When it
flowers, post another picture. Hazarding a guess I'd say a
rhododendron, with a flower bud beginning to swell.


Hi. Thank you for the response. Looking at pictures of rhododendron the
leaves do look very similar and from what I recall the flower heads were
composed of multiple flowers in a roughly ball-like cluster.
  #6  
Old 13-04-2017, 12:53 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Inherited plant

On 12/04/2017 22:15, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 12/04/17 21:28, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 21:14:35 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 19:59, Bigus wrote:
On 12/04/2017 19:56, Bigus wrote:
Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it
was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in
but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks

Hmmm attaching that image didn't work. Here it is:

https://unsee.cc/mirezado/

sigh

OK that link died, this one is allegedly up for one day:

https://unsee.cc/nuroteda/


Almost impossible to tell just from that particular picture. When it
flowers, post another picture. Hazarding a guess I'd say a
rhododendron, with a flower bud beginning to swell.


+1 on rhodo, as there aren't too many shrubs with large orange flowers,
although that looks more like a leaf than flower bud. I think there is
the beginning of chlorosis on the leaves, adding to the evidence for a
rhodo.


It's probably been in the same clump of soil for years. Now I know what
it likely is, I'll get some fresh ericaceous soil and a roomy container
for it.

Thanks

  #7  
Old 13-04-2017, 09:35 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 148
Default Inherited plant

On 13/04/2017 08:32, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 22:16:07 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 21:28, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 21:14:35 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 19:59, Bigus wrote:
On 12/04/2017 19:56, Bigus wrote:
Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks

Hmmm attaching that image didn't work. Here it is:

https://unsee.cc/mirezado/

sigh

OK that link died, this one is allegedly up for one day:

https://unsee.cc/nuroteda/

Almost impossible to tell just from that particular picture. When it
flowers, post another picture. Hazarding a guess I'd say a
rhododendron, with a flower bud beginning to swell.


Hi. Thank you for the response. Looking at pictures of rhododendron the
leaves do look very similar and from what I recall the flower heads were
composed of multiple flowers in a roughly ball-like cluster.


Yes that sounds like a rhodo. They like partial shade so should be
fine in the position you're suggesting. They like a slightly acid
soil. If your garden soil is chalky, you haven't really got much
chance of it doing well out in the garden, and that may be why it's in
a container. As you say, use ericaceous compost when you pot it on,
and keep the top of the root ball at the same level in the soil as it
was before, i.e. don't bury it. Watering occasionally with
'Sequestrene' or some other sequestered-iron fertiliser will keep the
leaves green, and they respond to an occasional shot of high-nitrogen
fertiliser such as sulphate of ammonia in the water or blood, fish and
bone scattered on the surface of the soil.

Or you could buy a bale of Peat and work that into the area you are
going to plant it into, even 50/50 peat and soil would be good, and
don't forget fertilizer. After planting water well.
David @ a still rain free side of Swansea Bay
  #8  
Old 13-04-2017, 01:07 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,682
Default Inherited plant

On 13/04/17 09:35, David wrote:
On 13/04/2017 08:32, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 22:16:07 +0100, Bigus


Hi. Thank you for the response. Looking at pictures of rhododendron the
leaves do look very similar and from what I recall the flower heads were
composed of multiple flowers in a roughly ball-like cluster.


Yes that sounds like a rhodo. They like partial shade so should be
fine in the position you're suggesting. They like a slightly acid
soil. If your garden soil is chalky, you haven't really got much
chance of it doing well out in the garden, and that may be why it's in
a container. As you say, use ericaceous compost when you pot it on,
and keep the top of the root ball at the same level in the soil as it
was before, i.e. don't bury it. Watering occasionally with
'Sequestrene' or some other sequestered-iron fertiliser will keep the
leaves green, and they respond to an occasional shot of high-nitrogen
fertiliser such as sulphate of ammonia in the water or blood, fish and
bone scattered on the surface of the soil.

Or you could buy a bale of Peat and work that into the area you are
going to plant it into, even 50/50 peat and soil would be good, and
don't forget fertilizer. After planting water well.
David @ a still rain free side of Swansea Bay


There are quite a few garden centres which don't sell peat, and even
peat-based products these days. Adding peat might work for a time, but
although it is acid, I don't think that it has any particularly strong
chalk-neutralising properties. The OP might do better to add sulphur as
an acidifying agent, but even that would fail after a time if the
underlying condition of the soil is alkaline. Providing the OP remembers
to water it (and with rainwater if he's in a hard-water area), a
container is the best way to go.

--

Jeff
  #9  
Old 18-04-2017, 06:49 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Inherited plant

On 13/04/2017 08:32, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 22:16:07 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 21:28, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 21:14:35 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 19:59, Bigus wrote:
On 12/04/2017 19:56, Bigus wrote:
Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks

Hmmm attaching that image didn't work. Here it is:

https://unsee.cc/mirezado/

sigh

OK that link died, this one is allegedly up for one day:

https://unsee.cc/nuroteda/

Almost impossible to tell just from that particular picture. When it
flowers, post another picture. Hazarding a guess I'd say a
rhododendron, with a flower bud beginning to swell.


Hi. Thank you for the response. Looking at pictures of rhododendron the
leaves do look very similar and from what I recall the flower heads were
composed of multiple flowers in a roughly ball-like cluster.


Yes that sounds like a rhodo. They like partial shade so should be
fine in the position you're suggesting. They like a slightly acid
soil. If your garden soil is chalky, you haven't really got much
chance of it doing well out in the garden, and that may be why it's in
a container. As you say, use ericaceous compost when you pot it on,
and keep the top of the root ball at the same level in the soil as it
was before, i.e. don't bury it. Watering occasionally with
'Sequestrene' or some other sequestered-iron fertiliser will keep the
leaves green, and they respond to an occasional shot of high-nitrogen
fertiliser such as sulphate of ammonia in the water or blood, fish and
bone scattered on the surface of the soil.


Thanks for the advice. I liberated a large wooden barrel from another
plant and will plant it in that with some ericaceaous compost as the
soil around here is largely clay.



  #10  
Old 18-04-2017, 05:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,682
Default Inherited plant

On 18/04/17 06:49, Bigus wrote:
On 13/04/2017 08:32, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 22:16:07 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 21:28, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 21:14:35 +0100, Bigus
wrote:

On 12/04/2017 19:59, Bigus wrote:
On 12/04/2017 19:56, Bigus wrote:
Hi

We inherited a plant from the previous owners of the house and it was in
a large container. It flowered last year with large orange flowers but
we have no idea what it is.

We have a plot of soil by a fence we were thinking of putting it in but
need to know if it minds only having sun up until avout noon.

Can anyone ID it from the attached photo?

Thanks

Hmmm attaching that image didn't work. Here it is:

https://unsee.cc/mirezado/

sigh

OK that link died, this one is allegedly up for one day:

https://unsee.cc/nuroteda/

Almost impossible to tell just from that particular picture. When it
flowers, post another picture. Hazarding a guess I'd say a
rhododendron, with a flower bud beginning to swell.


Hi. Thank you for the response. Looking at pictures of rhododendron the
leaves do look very similar and from what I recall the flower heads were
composed of multiple flowers in a roughly ball-like cluster.


Yes that sounds like a rhodo. They like partial shade so should be
fine in the position you're suggesting. They like a slightly acid
soil. If your garden soil is chalky, you haven't really got much
chance of it doing well out in the garden, and that may be why it's in
a container. As you say, use ericaceous compost when you pot it on,
and keep the top of the root ball at the same level in the soil as it
was before, i.e. don't bury it. Watering occasionally with
'Sequestrene' or some other sequestered-iron fertiliser will keep the
leaves green, and they respond to an occasional shot of high-nitrogen
fertiliser such as sulphate of ammonia in the water or blood, fish and
bone scattered on the surface of the soil.


Thanks for the advice. I liberated a large wooden barrel from another
plant and will plant it in that with some ericaceaous compost as the
soil around here is largely clay.


Rhodos can grow quite well in clay providing it is not alkaline (and it
usually isn't), and it is not waterlogged or bone dry half the time
(which it can be, depending on the drainage).

--

Jeff
 




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