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Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?



 
 
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  #1  
Old 16-04-2017, 07:08 PM
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2006
Posts: 24
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4" holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die back?

Thanks
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  #2  
Old 17-04-2017, 07:25 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 1,682
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

On 16/04/17 19:08, miljee wrote:
A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of
soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have
got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4"
holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die
back?

Thanks


That's what I would do, and as soon as you can get them in. It's best if
the leaves keep going as long as possible, as they will provide the
energy for next year's flowers.

--

Jeff
  #3  
Old 17-04-2017, 08:27 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 804
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

On 17/04/2017 07:25, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 16/04/17 19:08, miljee wrote:
A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of
soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have
got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4"
holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die
back?

Thanks


That's what I would do, and as soon as you can get them in. It's best if
the leaves keep going as long as possible, as they will provide the
energy for next year's flowers.


Bluebells, the ultimate thug. Be careful what you wish for :-)
  #4  
Old 17-04-2017, 08:35 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,312
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

The author has marked this message not to be archived. This post will be deleted on May 1, 2017.

On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 20:08:38 +0200, miljee
wrote:


A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of
soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have
got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4"
holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die
back?

Thanks


If they are of the Hispanic variety, plant them in your dustbin
shortly before the dustman arrives so that you don't get the chance to
change your mind!

Even thoroughbred and true-blue English bluebells can be difficult to
eradicate once they get established and start to spread, but the
Spanish ones are a real pain. They are in my late mother's garden, and
in the later years of her life she wasn't able to do any gardening,
and they got seriously out of control. I've been trying to eradicate
them for at least five years, and although I think I winning, it's a
slow process. The go deep, they're difficult to dig out (the bulbs can
have any shape from almost spherical to sausage-shaped), they multiply
by both seed and bulblets, and aren't simply eradicated with e.g.
glyphosate.

If anyone has any tips on eradicating them, please tell...

--

Chris

Gardening in West Cornwall overlooking the sea.
Mild, but very exposed to salt gales
  #5  
Old 17-04-2017, 02:15 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jan 2006
Posts: 24
Default

Thanks! No they're English, my friend is a purist!

I agree they can get out of hand, but my garden isn't very big so I am used to keeping an eye on 'over-enthusiastic' spreading!
  #6  
Old 19-04-2017, 10:21 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,352
Default Freshly dug up bluebells- how to plant?

On 17/04/2017 08:27, Stuart Noble wrote:
On 17/04/2017 07:25, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 16/04/17 19:08, miljee wrote:
A friend has given me a good clump of bluebells, largely now devoid of
soil (it dropped off as they were lifted), from her garden. Some have
got flowers.

Currently the clump is wrapped in damp newspaper in a flower pot.

How should I plant them? I have appropriate places, but do I just dig 4"
holes, drop the bulbs in, back fill and wait for the top growth to die
back?

Thanks


That's what I would do, and as soon as you can get them in. It's best if
the leaves keep going as long as possible, as they will provide the
energy for next year's flowers.


Bluebells, the ultimate thug. Be careful what you wish for :-)


I was going to say that! I would defy anyone to kill the wretched things

--
Charlie Pridham
Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk
 




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