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Thorny shrubs



 
 
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  #1  
Old 11-05-2003, 06:20 PM
sw
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Default Thorny shrubs

I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.
=== Sam ===


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  #2  
Old 11-05-2003, 06:56 PM
Stephen Goodall
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Default Thorny shrubs

I have managed to get some variegated Holly growing from cuttings this year.
Only problem for a boundary is they are slow growing.

Stephen
http://uk.geocities.com/gardeningforpleasureuk/

"sw" wrote in message
...
I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy

to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.
=== Sam ===




  #3  
Old 11-05-2003, 07:21 PM
The Devil's Advocate
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Default Thorny shrubs

I didn't know this, just looked in my book but you can take mallet cuttings
from berberis. I can send u the page if ur interested

From the English Riviera
If you live in Paradise why would you want to go abroad for a holiday?
Answers on a postcard to
http://www.cornishlight.freeserve.co.uk/rame.htm

Stephen Goodall wrote:
: I have managed to get some variegated Holly growing from cuttings
: this year. Only problem for a boundary is they are slow growing.
:
: Stephen
: http://uk.geocities.com/gardeningforpleasureuk/
:
: "sw" wrote in message
: ...
:: I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are
:: easy to grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types
:: before, but the cuttings never made roots.
:: === Sam ===


  #4  
Old 11-05-2003, 07:21 PM
bnd777
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Default Thorny shrubs

Pyracantha starter plants are pretty cheap at most nurseries and DIY stores
as are Escallonia
Both make a lovely thorhy barrier and grow pretty quickly too


"sw" wrote in message
...
I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy

to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.
=== Sam ===




  #5  
Old 12-05-2003, 08:21 AM
Nick Maclaren
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Default Thorny shrubs


In article , "The Devil's Advocate" writes:
| I didn't know this, just looked in my book but you can take mallet cuttings
| from berberis. I can send u the page if ur interested

According to the holder of the national collection, most of the
deciduous Berberis are absolute devils to take from cuttings.
And Bean recommends seed, too. I can certainly witness that
B. vulgaris is pretty tricky.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #6  
Old 12-05-2003, 10:20 AM
geoff
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Default Thorny shrubs

I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy
to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.


Pyrocanthus can be rooted from softwood cuttings and if you've ever "mixed
it" with such a hedge you'll know why it's called that - "Who planted that
flaming thing?!!" It grows fairly quickly too.

Geoff



  #7  
Old 12-05-2003, 12:20 PM
Anthony E Anson
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Default Thorny shrubs

The message
from "geoff" contains these words:

I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy

to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.


Pyrocanthus can be rooted from softwood cuttings and if you've ever "mixed
it" with such a hedge you'll know why it's called that - "Who planted that
flaming thing?!!" It grows fairly quickly too.


Both the flowering and the berry stages are very decorative, and the
birds benefit in the winter.

BTW, is there an evergreen variety?

--
Tony
Replace solidi with dots to reply: tony/anson snailything zetnet/co/uk

http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi
  #8  
Old 12-05-2003, 02:17 PM
Nick Maclaren
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Posts: n/a
Default Thorny shrubs


In article , "The Devil's Advocate" writes:
| I didn't know this, just looked in my book but you can take mallet cuttings
| from berberis. I can send u the page if ur interested

According to the holder of the national collection, most of the
deciduous Berberis are absolute devils to take from cuttings.
And Bean recommends seed, too. I can certainly witness that
B. vulgaris is pretty tricky.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #9  
Old 12-05-2003, 02:20 PM
geoff
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Posts: n/a
Default Thorny shrubs

I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy
to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.


Pyrocanthus can be rooted from softwood cuttings and if you've ever "mixed
it" with such a hedge you'll know why it's called that - "Who planted that
flaming thing?!!" It grows fairly quickly too.

Geoff



  #10  
Old 12-05-2003, 02:23 PM
Anthony E Anson
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Posts: n/a
Default Thorny shrubs

The message
from "geoff" contains these words:

I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy

to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.


Pyrocanthus can be rooted from softwood cuttings and if you've ever "mixed
it" with such a hedge you'll know why it's called that - "Who planted that
flaming thing?!!" It grows fairly quickly too.


Both the flowering and the berry stages are very decorative, and the
birds benefit in the winter.

BTW, is there an evergreen variety?

--
Tony
Replace solidi with dots to reply: tony/anson snailything zetnet/co/uk

http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi
  #11  
Old 13-05-2003, 04:20 AM
Rodger Whitlock
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Default Thorny shrubs

On Sun, 11 May 2003 17:16:20 +0000 (UTC), sw wrote:

I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.


Some of the flowering quinces (chaenomeles) are pretty prickly,
and they're dead easy from cuttings. Good flowers in spring,
reasonable foliage in summer, some have yellow-apple-ish fruits
in fall and winter.

Also easy from seed: leave the fruits on the ground until Feb,
then open, remove seeds, sow, and put pot outside. They come up
in about two months.

Another thorny is Poncirus trifoliata. There's a contorted
cultivar "Flying Dragon" if that kind of thing appeals to you.
Cuttings or seed, if you can find ripe fruit.

--
Rodger Whitlock
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
  #12  
Old 13-05-2003, 09:08 AM
david
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Default Thorny shrubs

Why not plant with hawthorn, then interplant with other
interesting/evergreen plants.
Hawthorn can be bought by the hundred in winter and is good value

--
David Hill
Abacus Nurseries
www.abacus-nurseries.co.uk


  #13  
Old 13-05-2003, 07:44 PM
bnd777
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Default Thorny shrubs

I planted Pyracantha for the very reason that it should stop my pesky
neighbour from leaning over to pick my pretty white and green ivy off the
one bit of fence amongst all their horrible conifers

"geoff" wrote in message
...
I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy

to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but

the
cuttings never made roots.


Pyrocanthus can be rooted from softwood cuttings and if you've ever "mixed
it" with such a hedge you'll know why it's called that - "Who planted that
flaming thing?!!" It grows fairly quickly too.

Geoff





  #14  
Old 16-05-2003, 05:20 AM
Hussein M.
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Default Thorny shrubs

On Tue, 13 May 2003 09:09:33 +0100, "david" wrote:

Why not plant with hawthorn, then interplant with other
interesting/evergreen plants.
Hawthorn can be bought by the hundred in winter and is good value



Isn't it truly excellent for wild life too?

There seem to be a zillion different Crataegus's. I got the tanacetifolia this year
(tansy leaved). A beery lout from the street seems to have decided that none of my plants
should have supports and overnight all the canes supporting the newly planted trees/shrubs
were vanished. I only discovered after seeing the top 1.5 ft of the Crataegus was snapped
and hanging. The bit with the most leaf too - I'm leading it to go up and over.

The common Crataegus monogyna:

Pollinated by midges apparently, so, if you want a good harvest ..... it's gonna be a
scratchy summer.

Hybridises freely with other members of this genus and with C. laevigata in the wild[186,
200].
There are many named forms selected for their ornamental value[200].
Seedling trees take from 5 - 8 years before they start bearing fruit, though grafted trees
will often flower heavily in their third year[K].
The flowers have a foetid smell somewhat like decaying fish. This attracts midges which
are the main means of fertilisation. When freshly open, the flowers have more pleasant
scent with balsamic undertones[245].

Seedlings should not be left in a seedbed for more than 2 years without being
transplanted[11]. In heavier shade they quickly become drawn and leggy, eventually
dying[186].
An important food plant for the caterpillars of many lepidoptera species[30], there are
149 insect species associated with this tree[24].
Plants are susceptible to fireblight[200].

Fruit - raw or cooked[2, 12]. Not very appetising raw[9, K], it is normally used for
making jams and preserves[9, 183]. The fruit can be dried, ground, mixed with flour and
used for making bread etc[46]. The fruit is about 1cm in diameter[200]. There are up to
five fairly large seeds in the centre of the fruit, these often stick together and so the
effect is of eating a cherry-like fruit with a single seed[K].
Young shoots - raw[5, 177]. A pleasant nutty flavour[144], they are a good addition to the
salad bowl[183].
A tea is made from the dried leaves[21, 46, 177, 183], it is a china tea substitute.
The roasted seeds are a coffee substitute[12, 21, 46, 177].
The flowers are used in syrups and sweet puddings[183].

A good hedge plant, it is very tolerant of being cut and of neglect and is able to
regenerate if cut back severely, it makes a good thorny stock-proof barrier[186] and
resists very strong winds. It is often used in layered hedges[11, 29]. The cultivar
'Stricta' has made a very good hedge 3.5 metres tall in an exposed maritime position at
Rosewarne in N. Cornwall[K].
Wood - very hard and tough, difficult to work. Used for tool handles etc. Valued in
turning[7, 46, 61]. A good fuel, giving out a lot of heat[4].


Hussein
Grow a little garden

spam block - for real addy, reverse letters of second level domain.
  #15  
Old 16-05-2003, 04:20 PM
Drakanthus
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Default Thorny shrubs

I want to plant a boundary of thorny shrubs. Which such shrubs are easy
to
grow from cuttings? I've tried growing some thorny types before, but the
cuttings never made roots.
=== Sam ===

Pyracantha root very easily. If you are prepared to wait one - two years you
can grow your own thorny hedge
very cheaply. Pyracantha is used widely in public places such as surrounding
car
parks. If you've got the nerve it doesn't hurt to snip one or two pieces
(about 4
inches long) from well established bushes (with permission of course) or
find out
when they are likely to be trimmed and ask if you can take a handful of
hedge
trimmings home with you. I generally get a rooting rate of about 75%. Just
tear
off the lower leaves, dip the tip into hormone rooting compound and push
into a
pot of compost or garden soil. You can cram about 20 cuttings into an 8 inch
pot.
Well water and keep in a North facing position for about six months until
roots
start to emerge from the bottom of the pot. Split them up and plant them
where
required. Keep well fed and watered for the first year.

--
Drakanthus.


(Spam filter: Include the word VB anywhere in the subject line or emails
will never reach me.)




 




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