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Old 20-02-2012, 06:02 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
Billy[_11_] Billy[_11_] is offline
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Nov 2011
Posts: 67
Default a small study of rotting

In article ,
songbird wrote:

Billy wrote:
songbird wrote:
Billy wrote:
...
Sounds like not enough brown/too much green. You want 25/1, B/G

i wasn't aiming for composting in the
bin. i was aiming to test if the worm
castings would contain enough bacteria to
control fungi. the answer i got was no.

if i were composting in a bin i surely
would have adjusted the proportions
appropriately and mixed from time to time.

as it goes, the bins here, i decidedly
do not want them getting into a hot stage
of composting. Ma would get a bit upset
if she could smell anything. which is why
worm composting works well.


Apparently the bacteria, and the fungi didn't get the message that you
weren't composting. What did you expect to happen when you threw a bunch
of organic material together?


the expectation was that some form of rot
would happen. i consider composting to be
quite different than rotting. which is why
i called it a small study of rotting and not
a small study of composting.

i did not know specifically what would happen.
that's why i did it. to answer the question
about bacteria in worm castings. to see if
castings were enough on their own to moderate or
control fungi. at the rate of application of
one dry quart to seventeen dry quarts of husks,
the answer is no.


songbird


Since fungi create a low pH environment, and bacteria a high pH one
(relatively speaking), it appears the bacteria won (NH4 = pH 7).
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum

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