Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
Richard Wright
 
Posts: n/a
Default hulling home grown coffee beans

A wonderful harvest of coffee beans in Sydney this year.

Dehulling on mass is a problem. A Queensland Government report on
coffee processing in the home is wonderfully informative and practical

http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/5471.html

One problem though. The report mentions hulling the beans by procesing
them at low speed in a "food processor or similar type of blender.
Plastic blades should be used . . ."

I have tried one or two electrical goods shops and cannot find such a
gadget with plastic blades (presumably provided as an accessory to the
normal stainless blades).

Can anybody point me to a brand?

  #2   Report Post  
Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
Dd
 
Posts: n/a
Default hulling home grown coffee beans

my Kenwood processor has a plastic and a multitude of steel blades for
everything
have had it for several years
hope this helps


"Richard Wright" wrote in message
...
A wonderful harvest of coffee beans in Sydney this year.

Dehulling on mass is a problem. A Queensland Government report on
coffee processing in the home is wonderfully informative and practical

http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/5471.html

One problem though. The report mentions hulling the beans by procesing
them at low speed in a "food processor or similar type of blender.
Plastic blades should be used . . ."

I have tried one or two electrical goods shops and cannot find such a
gadget with plastic blades (presumably provided as an accessory to the
normal stainless blades).

Can anybody point me to a brand?



  #3   Report Post  
Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
S. McLaren
 
Posts: n/a
Default hulling home grown coffee beans

Why slow speeds and with plastic blades?

Just Curious,

L


  #4   Report Post  
Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
Richard Wright
 
Posts: n/a
Default hulling home grown coffee beans

You want to crack the outside hull, without doing too much damage to
the bean inside. The cracked hull falls off and you winnow it away by
blowing at the residue with a hair dryer. Dehulling is the most tricky
part of preparing coffee beans at home.

BTW, between the hull and the bean is a
silvery, parchment like, skin which you ignore. It blows off in the
roasting.

On Sun, 20 Oct 2002 07:41:46 GMT, "S. McLaren"
wrote:

Why slow speeds and with plastic blades?

Just Curious,

L


  #5   Report Post  
Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
S. McLaren
 
Posts: n/a
Default hulling home grown coffee beans

OK, I leanrt something new today. I usually get the Maranatha Praise coffee
beans which come preroasted.




  #6   Report Post  
Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
Richard Wright
 
Posts: n/a
Default hulling home grown coffee beans

That's what I usually do! But there are kilos of coffee beans on my
bushes this year.

BTW somebody emailed me asking why you don't have to dehull the green
coffee beans that they have seen being roasted in a fancy coffee
store. The answer is that the green beans have been already dehulled
before they are sold. There are two stages leading up to the
production of green beans - getting off the red skin and pulp, and
dehulling (which was my problem).

Since my original posting I have found that an old fashioned
hand-cranked mincer is more than satisfactory. All you do is take off
the blade and cutter at the outlet. The beans go down the spiral feed.
You hold a board against the outlet and the backup of beans in the
spiral cracks the hulls, without damaging the green beans. Then you
use a hair drier to blow the hulls off the beans.


On Tue, 22 Oct 2002 02:32:49 GMT, "S. McLaren"
wrote:

OK, I leanrt something new today. I usually get the Maranatha Praise coffee
beans which come preroasted.




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First Ever Taste of Home-Grown Spuds Gilly United Kingdom 6 24-08-2005 10:40 PM
weird home-grown avocado fruits tandrews Edible Gardening 2 12-06-2004 08:02 PM
coffee grounds from cold press coffee user Roses 4 01-05-2004 04:03 PM
Hulling Sunflower Seeds Mervyn Thomas Edible Gardening 2 15-10-2003 03:12 AM
Home Grown Capsicum Willow Australia 7 05-04-2003 06:33 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:40 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017