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Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
Barbara
 
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Default Scrub/bush turkeys


Has any one got any ideas on how to keep them out of my garden?
Am going demented, they keep scratching up my garden & I have lost dozens of
ferns & plants. Unless I stand in the garden all day shooing them away, they
just keep doing untold damage. Council wont capture & relocate.
--
Barbara



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Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
len brauer
 
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Default Scrub/bush turkeys

a tough one barbara,

could you fence off certain areas of the garden? you would probably
need to cover as well so they cannot fly in. best i can think of apart
from redesignng the garden and live with them.

len

On Sat, 26 Oct 2002 09:31:12 +1000, "Barbara" snipeped
--
happy gardening
'it works for me it could work for you,'

"in the end ya' gotta do what ya' gotta do" but consider others and the environment
http://hub.dataline.net.au/~gardnlen/
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Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
Barbara
 
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Default Scrub/bush turkeys

len brauer wrote:
a tough one barbara,

could you fence off certain areas of the garden? you would probably
need to cover as well so they cannot fly in. best i can think of apart
from redesignng the garden and live with them.


Am going to put some plastic board type stuff around it tonight. I don't
want that area fenced off, am just so mad, I had several different & very
colourful caladiums, just started to make a nice show, plus heaps of ferns,
ornemental gingers & groundcover, all of which have disappeared. I know once
the breeding season is over, they will not do so much damage, but putting
up with it in the mean time, is breaking my heart & spirit.
This is what happens when people feed wild birds, without thinking. For
years there were only 2 turkeys here up till 3 years ago, in a little strip
of bush, (I live almost in the CBD of Maroochydore). Neighbour started
feeding them, creating an artifical enviroment, so they are breeding like
rabbits. there are 18-20 of them here now. Not enough room in the bush for
so many of them to build their mounds, so they are trying to build them in
our gardens. The house at the back of me is rented & they never bother about
the yard much, so a turkey has built a mound there, which at the moment
stands over a metre high, right at my back fence. He is trying to get more
litter for the mound, & my yard is his choice.
Naturally the neighbour that feeds them has no interest in gardening, so he
doesn't care. also feeds the ibis, there are about 50-60 of them at the end
of the street at any one time, looks like the local garbage dump. (there is
not one TV arial in the street, that is straight)
This is what happens when humans interfere with nature.
Sorry for the rant, am really upset this morning.
--
Barbara


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Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
David Hare-Scott
 
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"Barbara" wrote in message
...

Has any one got any ideas on how to keep them out of my garden?
Am going demented, they keep scratching up my garden & I have lost

dozens of
ferns & plants. Unless I stand in the garden all day shooing them

away, they
just keep doing untold damage. Council wont capture & relocate.
--
Barbara



Get a dog of the territorial type who will make it their mission in life
to roust turkeys 24 hours a day.

David


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Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
Barbara
 
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Default Scrub/bush turkeys

David Hare-Scott wrote:


Get a dog of the territorial type who will make it their mission in
life to roust turkeys 24 hours a day.

David


LOL. have 2 4 month old dogs & 4 cats......the cats have been raised to
leave wildlife alone, the dogs only chase the turkeys when we do, as then
they think it is a game, other than that they leave them alone.
--
Barbara




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Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
Bushy
 
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So, play more with your dogs!
Peter
;)

"Barbara" wrote in message
...
David Hare-Scott wrote:


Get a dog of the territorial type who will make it their mission in
life to roust turkeys 24 hours a day.

David


LOL. have 2 4 month old dogs & 4 cats......the cats have been raised to
leave wildlife alone, the dogs only chase the turkeys when we do, as then
they think it is a game, other than that they leave them alone.
--
Barbara




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Old 05-04-2003, 06:32 AM
David Hare-Scott
 
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Default Scrub/bush turkeys


"Barbara" wrote in message
...
David Hare-Scott wrote:


Get a dog of the territorial type who will make it their mission in
life to roust turkeys 24 hours a day.

David


LOL. have 2 4 month old dogs & 4 cats......the cats have been raised

to
leave wildlife alone, the dogs only chase the turkeys when we do, as

then
they think it is a game, other than that they leave them alone.
--
Barbara



Training a dog to ignore most wildlife or any other sort of life is very
hard if you have a dog that is capable of removing a perceived
trespasser. Unless you are with them their discrimination of threat on
the basis of the nature of the animal/person concerned is poor unless it
is well known to them.

It is much easier to train such a one that while you are away what is IN
their territory is fair game and what is OUT is not. I have a red
kelpie who is the soul of discretion and enlightenment in public places.
Just don't jump my fence or touch my car when I am not around.

David


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Old 05-04-2003, 06:33 AM
Barbara
 
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Default Scrub/bush turkeys

len brauer wrote:
a tough one barbara,


Found a very simple solution......a rubber snake strategically placed so it
is easily seen by the Turkeys, plus hose coiled through the garden to
resemble a snake. 2 turkey free days, so far.
--
Barbara


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Old 05-04-2003, 06:33 AM
Kate Quirk
 
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Default Scrub/bush turkeys

I realise that this is a gardening group, and so everyone is working from a
different paradigm to myself, but I must admit to being a bit shocked by the
attitudes voiced (even jokingly) about our native wildlife. Turkeys are by
no means endangered, but everytime I see a species doing well in the
drastically altered landscape of our towns and suburbs, I can't help but
give a little cheer. We have numerous turkeys in our suburb, and I figure
that if people want to live in bushy areas, then they have to put up with
the "problematic" wildlife (possums, turkeys etc), just as they do the
"pretty" animals like king parrots and lorikeets.

Okay, now that I've had *my* rant....... National Parks put out a brochure
detailing how to live along side bush turkeys (I'm surprised that the
council didn't mention this). One of its main recommendations is that you
put some fine metal or sturdy plastic mesh just under your mulch or
whatever. This makes it very difficult for turkeys to scratch, and so they
give up. As someone else mentioned, turkeys (like all Australian wildlife)
are protected. You are not allowed to harm them or, strictly speaking, even
remove them to another location. Neither NPWS nor the council will remove
an animal unless it is likely to cause harm to itself or to others.

Kate


"Barbara" wrote in message
...

Has any one got any ideas on how to keep them out of my garden?
Am going demented, they keep scratching up my garden & I have lost dozens

of
ferns & plants. Unless I stand in the garden all day shooing them away,

they
just keep doing untold damage. Council wont capture & relocate.
--
Barbara




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Old 05-04-2003, 06:33 AM
Barbara
 
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Default Scrub/bush turkeys

Kate Quirk wrote:
I realise that this is a gardening group, and so everyone is working
from a different paradigm to myself, but I must admit to being a bit
shocked by the attitudes voiced (even jokingly) about our native
wildlife. Turkeys are by no means endangered, but everytime I see a
species doing well in the drastically altered landscape of our towns
and suburbs, I can't help but give a little cheer. We have numerous
turkeys in our suburb, and I figure that if people want to live in
bushy areas, then they have to put up with the "problematic" wildlife
(possums, turkeys etc), just as they do the "pretty" animals like
king parrots and lorikeets.


Kate:
I had no problem about the couple of turkeys that have resided in our area
for years, my problem is with a neighbour who feeds them & creates an
artificial enviroment for the birds. I live 2 mins walk from the CBD of
our town (a very old area), there is only 1 tiny bit of bush surrounded by 2
main roads. For many years the status quo of the birds remained static,
however now they are being fed, they are breeding prolifically, & have to
wander further afield to build their mounds, this means wandering onto main
roads, dangerous both for the turkeys & car drivers. There is now 20,
repeat 20, turkeys trying to live in am extremely small section of
bush......I am sure you will not find that many turkeys in the wild.
Other than the turkeys I go out of my way to make my garden friendly for the
local wildlife, have a possum box in one of my trees, a couple of bird baths
for the birds (a pair of wattle birds have build a nest & raised their young
in one of my plant pots), several green tree snakes can often be seen in my
garden & swimming in my fish pond, I have made my garden extremely lizard
friendly. The turkeys by wrecking my garden are also removing the covers
that the lizards & snakes use. My garden is not a formal one & in the eyes
of many is probably downright untidy, no formal borders, just recycled
timber or small logs, rocks & bits & pieces placed where ever for the
lizards, but I love it & it is apreciated by others for it's peacefulness.
I encourage local wildlife where ever I can, but I have now come to hate the
turkeys.


Okay, now that I've had *my* rant....... National Parks put out a
brochure detailing how to live along side bush turkeys (I'm surprised
that the council didn't mention this). One of its main
recommendations is that you put some fine metal or sturdy plastic
mesh just under your mulch or whatever. This makes it very
difficult for turkeys to scratch, and so they give up. As someone
else mentioned, turkeys (like all Australian wildlife) are protected.
You are not allowed to harm them or, strictly speaking, even remove
them to another location. Neither NPWS nor the council will remove
an animal unless it is likely to cause harm to itself or to others.


The council gave me no advise what so ever, however I have come up with my
own solution, as posted this morning.
A rubber snake & garden hose has worked wonders.
However the problems still remains, neighbours who mistakingly think they
are doing the right thing by feeding wildlife.
They would be better off (both wildlife & humans) if they planted a garden
like I have with a mixture of plants, that can sustain some wildlife,
instead of having a barren yard, & throwing food around ad hoc.
End of my rant.





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Old 05-04-2003, 06:33 AM
Augie
 
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Way down yonder in the pawpaw patch, Barbara was heard to sing:

|| My garden is not a formal one & in the eyes
|| of many is probably downright untidy, no formal borders, just recycled
|| timber or small logs, rocks & bits & pieces placed where ever for the
|| lizards, but I love it & it is apreciated by others for it's peacefulness.
|| I encourage local wildlife where ever I can,
||

Hi Barb!

As you know we are putting in a garden from scratch. I would like to know
what types of recycled timbers you find best?

Your garden sounds so very much like what I like, no set 'theme' but
things I like, in places I like, encouraging the things I like.
--

Augie

Doing up your house?
Australian house renovaters - meet here!
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AussieRenovaters
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Old 05-04-2003, 06:33 AM
Barbara
 
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Augie wrote:
Way down yonder in the pawpaw patch, Barbara was heard to sing:


As you know we are putting in a garden from scratch. I would like to
know what types of recycled timbers you find best?

Your garden sounds so very much like what I like, no set 'theme' but
things I like, in places I like, encouraging the things I like.


You just summed my garden up.
Umm..most of what I have sort of fell of the back of trucks :-)
We often have bits of hardwood & sleepers that are used for packing left
over from deliveries, Bob just bought them home & I placed them around,
never cut one of them, the length determined the shape/length of the garden
bed. I also got some cheap from a salvage store. a lot don't match up in
size, but that doesn't bother me.
I stick to hardwood planks & the odd sleeper that I come across, fence posts
are also good. 2nd hand timber yards are the best places to hunt around.
LOL I also keep an eye out for anyone cutting down trees, sometiimes the
logs/branches are perfect for edging. most people don't seem to mind me
asking for their off cuts, either that or they think I am some sort of
eccentric old lady & they are not game to say no to me:-)

--
Barbara


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Old 05-04-2003, 06:33 AM
Trish Brown
 
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Barbara wrote:

len brauer wrote:
a tough one barbara,


Found a very simple solution......a rubber snake strategically placed so it
is easily seen by the Turkeys, plus hose coiled through the garden to
resemble a snake. 2 turkey free days, so far.
--
Barbara


LOL! And ROTFL!!!! Barbara, you are *brilliant*!!! I *knew* the solution
would probably be a simple one! Well done! And thanks for getting back
to us with your idea - I bet lots of us will remember it!

(NB. Our local Go-Lo is selling hunormous rubber snakes for only $2!
Might be an idea to stock up! :-) )
--
Trish {|:-}
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 05-04-2003, 06:33 AM
Rod
 
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"Barbara" wrote in message
...
len brauer wrote:
a tough one barbara,


Found a very simple solution......a rubber snake strategically placed so it
is easily seen by the Turkeys, plus hose coiled through the garden to
resemble a snake. 2 turkey free days, so far.
--
Barbara

You may have to move them around at odd intervals so that the turkeys do not
get used to them.You notice crows sitting on scarecrows, right?

Rod


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Old 05-04-2003, 06:33 AM
Barbara
 
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Trish Brown wrote:
Barbara wrote:

LOL! And ROTFL!!!! Barbara, you are *brilliant*!!! I *knew* the
solution would probably be a simple one! Well done! And thanks for
getting back to us with your idea - I bet lots of us will remember it!

(NB. Our local Go-Lo is selling hunormous rubber snakes for only $2!
Might be an idea to stock up! :-) )


I can't take any credit, as it happened by accident. Son called in, he had
the snake, the left over from a practical joke at a party he had been to. He
left it out in the yard & I realised that the turkeys hadn't been in since
he had left it there.

--
Barbara




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