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Old 11-05-2006, 10:58 AM posted to aus.gardens
Roberta Bagshaw
 
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Default Cape Weed - control the old fashioned way?

Yep Jonno..... a hungry goat would probably do it..... and chooks would
probably do the trick also..... but not everyone can keep animals where they
live!

Personally I found geese very helpful for keeping many weeds under control,
and would make sure that when the goslings hatched, I would feed them any
edible weeds so that would become part of their preferred grazing for the
rest of their days!

~B~

"Jonno" wrote in message
...
Chookie wrote:
In article ,
Linda H wrote:


...a strong dose of Sulphate of Ammonia
which literally burned the weed by an overapplication of nitrogen. She
applied it to her plague of clover and got rid of it! It is certainly
a
cheap (and relatively safe) solution.


It works on clover because clover is a nitrogen-fixing plant -- you are
giving
it a nitrogen overdose, against which it has no defences (you can kill
some
Australian plants with phosphorus the same way). If Cape Weed isn't a
legume,
it won't work. You could try boiling water, but as it's a perennial it
probably will still stagger along.


Okay, that's worth a bash, Roberta. So, Sulphate of Ammonia; where do
you buy that? (Sorry, I know I seem to be vague about availability of
these chemicals - but yeah, I am, I'm as vague as... as that stuff you
buy from that whatsitsname place, you know?)


Hardware shops and nurseries.


Dunno but a hungry goat sounds like it could do the job...
Chooks?




  #32   Report Post  
Old 11-05-2006, 11:52 AM posted to aus.gardens
Jonno
 
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Default Cape Weed - control the old fashioned way?

Roberta Bagshaw wrote:
Yep Jonno..... a hungry goat would probably do it..... and chooks would
probably do the trick also..... but not everyone can keep animals where they
live!

Personally I found geese very helpful for keeping many weeds under control,
and would make sure that when the goslings hatched, I would feed them any
edible weeds so that would become part of their preferred grazing for the
rest of their days!

~B~

"Jonno" wrote in message
...

Chookie wrote:

In article ,
Linda H wrote:



...a strong dose of Sulphate of Ammonia
which literally burned the weed by an overapplication of nitrogen. She
applied it to her plague of clover and got rid of it! It is certainly
a
cheap (and relatively safe) solution.


It works on clover because clover is a nitrogen-fixing plant -- you are
giving
it a nitrogen overdose, against which it has no defences (you can kill
some
Australian plants with phosphorus the same way). If Cape Weed isn't a
legume,
it won't work. You could try boiling water, but as it's a perennial it
probably will still stagger along.



Okay, that's worth a bash, Roberta. So, Sulphate of Ammonia; where do
you buy that? (Sorry, I know I seem to be vague about availability of
these chemicals - but yeah, I am, I'm as vague as... as that stuff you
buy from that whatsitsname place, you know?)


Hardware shops and nurseries.



Dunno but a hungry goat sounds like it could do the job...
Chooks?





I'd buy a cheap one first though, just to test it out (grin!!)

  #33   Report Post  
Old 11-05-2006, 11:54 AM posted to aus.gardens
Jonno
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cape Weed - control the old fashioned way?

Jonno wrote:
Roberta Bagshaw wrote:
Yep Jonno..... a hungry goat would probably do it..... and chooks would
probably do the trick also..... but not everyone can keep animals where they
live!

Personally I found geese very helpful for keeping many weeds under control,
and would make sure that when the goslings hatched, I would feed them any
edible weeds so that would become part of their preferred grazing for the
rest of their days!

~B~

"Jonno" wrote in message
...

Chookie wrote:

In article ,
Linda H wrote:



...a strong dose of Sulphate of Ammonia
which literally burned the weed by an overapplication of nitrogen. She
applied it to her plague of clover and got rid of it! It is certainly
a
cheap (and relatively safe) solution.


It works on clover because clover is a nitrogen-fixing plant -- you are
giving
it a nitrogen overdose, against which it has no defences (you can kill
some
Australian plants with phosphorus the same way). If Cape Weed isn't a
legume,
it won't work. You could try boiling water, but as it's a perennial it
probably will still stagger along.



Okay, that's worth a bash, Roberta. So, Sulphate of Ammonia; where do
you buy that? (Sorry, I know I seem to be vague about availability of
these chemicals - but yeah, I am, I'm as vague as... as that stuff you
buy from that whatsitsname place, you know?)


Hardware shops and nurseries.



Dunno but a hungry goat sounds like it could do the job...
Chooks?





I'd buy a cheap one first though, just to test it out (grin!!)

Also geese make a great alarm/attack system. Being the victim of one
such attack I can vouch for it.
Goats, well ya dont bend over...


  #34   Report Post  
Old 11-05-2006, 01:47 PM posted to aus.gardens
Terry Collins
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brunfelsia - neurotoxin

Chookie wrote:


Not as invasive as the cats from next door, I assure you!


True, they have to walk right past it and as I found out today, over a
new sucker.



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