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Old 17-10-2006, 02:04 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

There is one thing I have noticed about water restrictions in
Melbourne. When people's lawns die out they are replaced by weeds and
large bare patches. The overall effect is to make the garden look
exceedingly bad. People just give up tending it altogether since no
matter what you do it will look bad.

Many gardens in my suburb were showpieces - now they look like the kind
of gardens that yobbo's have. When I drive across Melbourne at the end
of summer I see a parched strangled looking city that is a shadow of
its former self. Clearly it is a city that has lost its pride. State
Governments used to call Victoria the garden state. You'll note that
this description has dissapeared from the lexicon. It would be a joke
to continue using it.

There appears to be a change afoot regarding gardens, especially lawns.
Peter Cundall recently said something to the effect that lawns are a
thing of the past and appearred to be endorsing the new parched look of
Australian cities. I suspect he hasnt had sex in a long time.

New drought hardy gardens are being pushed. These generally consist of
large areas of gravel and half strangled looking flax type plants that
you see in deserts. I am reminded of a scene in the movie "Sparticus"
where Kirk Douglas is working in some sort of open cut mine. All you
see is gravel gravel gravel. These type of gardens are appalling - when
you compare them to a traditional garden like Melbourne's botanical
gardens the effect is stark.

What worries me is what fate lies in store for my garden. I have
invested a lot of time in it and take pride in it. In addition, it is
the only way I have of expressing my creativity. It's my own little
patch of the world that I regard as a tranquil refuge from a world
that's spinning off its hinges.Now it would seem that I am destined to
have a yobbo style garden or else one of those appalling gravel themed
gardens.

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Old 17-10-2006, 10:41 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens


"Nick" wrote in message
oups.com...
There is one thing I have noticed about water restrictions in
Melbourne. When people's lawns die out they are replaced by weeds and
large bare patches. The overall effect is to make the garden look
exceedingly bad. People just give up tending it altogether since no
matter what you do it will look bad.

Many gardens in my suburb were showpieces - now they look like the kind
of gardens that yobbo's have. When I drive across Melbourne at the end
of summer I see a parched strangled looking city that is a shadow of
its former self. Clearly it is a city that has lost its pride. State
Governments used to call Victoria the garden state. You'll note that
this description has dissapeared from the lexicon. It would be a joke
to continue using it.

There appears to be a change afoot regarding gardens, especially lawns.
Peter Cundall recently said something to the effect that lawns are a
thing of the past and appearred to be endorsing the new parched look of
Australian cities. I suspect he hasnt had sex in a long time.

New drought hardy gardens are being pushed. These generally consist of
large areas of gravel and half strangled looking flax type plants that
you see in deserts. I am reminded of a scene in the movie "Sparticus"
where Kirk Douglas is working in some sort of open cut mine. All you
see is gravel gravel gravel. These type of gardens are appalling - when
you compare them to a traditional garden like Melbourne's botanical
gardens the effect is stark.

What worries me is what fate lies in store for my garden. I have
invested a lot of time in it and take pride in it. In addition, it is
the only way I have of expressing my creativity. It's my own little
patch of the world that I regard as a tranquil refuge from a world
that's spinning off its hinges.Now it would seem that I am destined to
have a yobbo style garden or else one of those appalling gravel themed
gardens.

Do you have the money and a spot to put in a tank? If so do it and prepare
for next year's summer. It will rain again, and as BP said be prepared.

Jim
Waiting for rain in southern inland Qld.


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Old 18-10-2006, 12:47 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

"Nick" wrote in message

There appears to be a change afoot regarding gardens, especially

lawns.
Peter Cundall recently said something to the effect that lawns are a
thing of the past and appearred to be endorsing the new parched look

of
Australian cities. I suspect he hasnt had sex in a long time.


That is an extremely silly thing to say. You just spent ages telling
us that your suburb looks ghastly, gardens now look they are owned by
yobbos, the State is no longer called the garden State, but then say
that a garden expert who SHOULD notice how hard it is to maintain
lawns in our new drier climate hasn't had sex in a long
time!!!!!!!!!!! If you think that Cundall hasn't had sex lately then
by your own post about dying lawns and yobbos, you indicate that you
must be a virgin.

You may not like not having a lawn but its the new reality unless you
are prepared to do some serious work.

New drought hardy gardens are being pushed.


And sensibly so.

These generally consist of
large areas of gravel and half strangled looking flax type plants

that
you see in deserts.


You haven't looked close enough or hard enough. Look up Michael McCoy
for a start. His gardens do feature gravel but then so do most of the
best gardens in Britain. It's a great medium for keeping the place
looking neat and simply wonderful as a growing medium on the edges of
paths for self seeders.

And if you know anything about gardening then you will recognise the
name of Beth Chatto who is one of Britian's greatest gardeners and
gardens in a very dry location. Get her book on gravel gardening out
of the library and then come back and tell us how ugly gravel is, if
you dare. Her dry gravel garden is qunitessentially lush English
gardening at its best.

It's al labout plant choice and design for beauty not about ow much
water you can waste.

What worries me is what fate lies in store for my garden. I have
invested a lot of time in it and take pride in it. In addition, it

is
the only way I have of expressing my creativity. It's my own little
patch of the world that I regard as a tranquil refuge from a world
that's spinning off its hinges.Now it would seem that I am destined

to
have a yobbo style garden or else one of those appalling gravel

themed
gardens.


Then get off your butt and do some research. You can still have a
very beautiful and traditional garden but you need to make wise plant
choices and have a very small patch of lawn which may not be a grass
lawn.


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Old 18-10-2006, 02:53 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

snipped good reply
Then get off your butt and do some research. You can still have a
very beautiful and traditional garden but you need to make wise plant
choices and have a very small patch of lawn which may not be a grass
lawn.


Absolutely. I've managed to have great gardens in SE qld, which hasn't had
decent rain for, oh, about 10 years. Still, we are all used to it, and have
tanks and recycle all water instead of having automated sprinkler systems
galore as all your apparently garden guru neighbours most likely had. I had
roses, herbs, vegies, the works, all on water bucketed out from washing
machine and bath; as we were buying water at $80 every two weeks, every drop
was precious. I wasn't the only one, everyone else in the community does
too. Now I live in the tropics, I still use my watering can; a hose just
doesn't feel right. Time you people who've had water while the rest of
australia hasn't adjust your gardening methods, buy some tanks, and get on
with life. Moaning about how sad your dead lawn is and expecting the
government to build bigger dams won't cause rain, and it will evaporate from
the dams when it does. If you have a tank, you'll be laughing over your
green lush garden while those around you complain. Oh, and learn to mulch.


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Old 18-10-2006, 03:38 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

Nick wrote:

Many gardens in my suburb were showpieces - now they look like the kind
of gardens that yobbo's have. When I drive across Melbourne at the end
of summer I see a parched strangled looking city that is a shadow of
its former self. Clearly it is a city that has lost its pride.


Nope, you are an idiot with his head up his arse.

There appears to be a change afoot regarding gardens, especially lawns.
Peter Cundall recently said something to the effect that lawns are a
thing of the past and appearred to be endorsing the new parched look of
Australian cities. I suspect he hasnt had sex in a long time.


Lawns are a totally fscking useless idea and there is a mile long list
as to what is wrong with them

New drought hardy gardens are being pushed. These generally consist of
large areas of gravel and half strangled looking flax type plants that
you see in deserts.


Stop watching commercial TVs and start to think for yourself. Gardens
that look like a design from a TV show just show what low inteeligence
you have.


What worries me is what fate lies in store for my garden.


Since you are such an obvious selfish dickwad, may I suggest you install
a greywater diverter to water your lawn.


They were right, future wars will be fought over water {:-).
Everyone in the street stopped wasting water on their luscious lawns,
except one selfish prick who continue to pour it one. I wonder why it
died? He does have bare ground.

Lol, I love my culturally diverse front verge; paspalum, bindi, barell
medic, white clover, red clover, something bird cage keepers keep
knocking off, dandelion, oats(?) and kikuyu.



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Old 18-10-2006, 09:57 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens


"meeee" wrote in message
...
snipped good reply
Then get off your butt and do some research. You can still have a
very beautiful and traditional garden but you need to make wise plant
choices and have a very small patch of lawn which may not be a grass
lawn.


Absolutely. I've managed to have great gardens in SE qld, which hasn't had
decent rain for, oh, about 10 years. Still, we are all used to it, and

have
tanks and recycle all water instead of having automated sprinkler systems
galore as all your apparently garden guru neighbours most likely had. I

had
roses, herbs, vegies, the works, all on water bucketed out from washing
machine and bath; as we were buying water at $80 every two weeks, every

drop
was precious. I wasn't the only one, everyone else in the community does
too. Now I live in the tropics, I still use my watering can; a hose just
doesn't feel right. Time you people who've had water while the rest of
australia hasn't adjust your gardening methods, buy some tanks, and get on
with life. Moaning about how sad your dead lawn is and expecting the
government to build bigger dams won't cause rain, and it will evaporate

from
the dams when it does. If you have a tank, you'll be laughing over your
green lush garden while those around you complain. Oh, and learn to mulch.


and if you don't already do it cut your lawn high and mulch the grass back
in to it.

rob


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Old 18-10-2006, 10:49 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens


"George.com" wrote in message
...

"meeee" wrote in message
...
snipped good reply
Then get off your butt and do some research. You can still have a
very beautiful and traditional garden but you need to make wise plant
choices and have a very small patch of lawn which may not be a grass
lawn.


Absolutely. I've managed to have great gardens in SE qld, which hasn't
had
decent rain for, oh, about 10 years. Still, we are all used to it, and

have
tanks and recycle all water instead of having automated sprinkler systems
galore as all your apparently garden guru neighbours most likely had. I

had
roses, herbs, vegies, the works, all on water bucketed out from washing
machine and bath; as we were buying water at $80 every two weeks, every

drop
was precious. I wasn't the only one, everyone else in the community does
too. Now I live in the tropics, I still use my watering can; a hose just
doesn't feel right. Time you people who've had water while the rest of
australia hasn't adjust your gardening methods, buy some tanks, and get
on
with life. Moaning about how sad your dead lawn is and expecting the
government to build bigger dams won't cause rain, and it will evaporate

from
the dams when it does. If you have a tank, you'll be laughing over your
green lush garden while those around you complain. Oh, and learn to
mulch.


and if you don't already do it cut your lawn high and mulch the grass back
in to it.

rob


Yep, great tip there....or do what DH does and don't cut it at all


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Old 18-10-2006, 01:13 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

"meeee" wrote in message
news
the dams when it does. If you have a tank, you'll be laughing over your
green lush garden while those around you complain. Oh, and learn to
mulch.


and if you don't already do it cut your lawn high and mulch the grass
back
in to it.

rob


Yep, great tip there....or do what DH does and don't cut it at all


oh please, you people, lawns are just SO passť anyway - pete cundall's
right. g

anyway, i'm just wondering if someone who trolls a gardening n.g. is called
a gnome. :-S
kylie


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Old 18-10-2006, 09:37 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

g'day nick,

mmm did post a reply seems to have gotten lost?

anyhow if gardeners have thought it through for this predominately dry
country of ours, they would be nurturing indemic native species very
suited to the gardeners growing conditions. no good trying to grow a
water loving plant in a garden that doesn't get lots of rain, as it is
the same with the aspect of the yard and where gardens are ie.,.
things that need a northern or eastern aspect may not do terribly well
on a western aspect.

the asian infuence may suit some if they want that ordered look but to
me they always seem hotter and drier gardens in our climate.

and every gardener should be making use of the recycled water, and
have a rainwater tank of sunbstantial capacity installed.

but i do applaud those who have let their lawns/garden go to rack and
ruin so to speak, so called weeds are better than nothing just shows
what could be achieved in gardens if a lesson was taken from the
weeds.

and at the end of the day the use of mushroom compost in gardens and
then covered with heaps of usefull mulch eg.,. hay, sugar cane
mulches, the gardens won't dry out as much, and use far less water.
and if garens are planted along the contours and stgructures are set
to trap run off water and put it underground that will bring up the
moisture capacity of the whole yard.

On 17 Oct 2006 05:04:14 -0700, "Nick" wrote:

snipped
With peace and brightest of blessings,

len

--
"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

http://www.gardenlen.com
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Old 19-10-2006, 12:51 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens


"gardenlen" wrote in message
...
g'day nick,

mmm did post a reply seems to have gotten lost?

anyhow if gardeners have thought it through for this predominately dry
country of ours, they would be nurturing indemic native species very
suited to the gardeners growing conditions. no good trying to grow a
water loving plant in a garden that doesn't get lots of rain, as it is
the same with the aspect of the yard and where gardens are ie.,.
things that need a northern or eastern aspect may not do terribly well
on a western aspect.

but i do applaud those who have let their lawns/garden go to rack and
ruin so to speak, so called weeds are better than nothing just shows
what could be achieved in gardens if a lesson was taken from the
weeds.

and at the end of the day the use of mushroom compost in gardens and
then covered with heaps of usefull mulch eg.,. hay, sugar cane
mulches, the gardens won't dry out as much, and use far less water.
and if garens are planted along the contours and stgructures are set
to trap run off water and put it underground that will bring up the
moisture capacity of the whole yard.


unfortunately on many lawns Len they are dead level, such is the appeal of
manicured grass. If you want rain we'll gladly give you some, it has been
cool and wet this month after a glorious warm and sunny september.

How your garden, is the mushroom compost still going ok? Given its low mix
of NPK my suspicion is that it will be depleted in a growing season with
around 1/2 the nutrients used up. What are your experiences with it long
term? I have used some as a base in a raised bed which has just been planted
with lettuces.

Rob




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Old 19-10-2006, 03:25 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

Here in WA water shortages have been with us since the late 1960's, and look
like continuing for a goodly while yet.

If it comes down to a choice of potable water coming from my drinking tap,
or a green lawn I sure as hell know which choice I'd make.

My 2 cents worth is that Nick adapt to the new water way of the world or go
the way of the other dinosaurs.

Flooz in a hot dry WA!


"Nick" wrote in message
oups.com...
There is one thing I have noticed about water restrictions in
Melbourne. When people's lawns die out they are replaced by weeds and
large bare patches. The overall effect is to make the garden look
exceedingly bad. People just give up tending it altogether since no
matter what you do it will look bad.



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Old 19-10-2006, 09:29 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

g'day rob,

you can send the rain anytime you like mate, we will welcome it with
open arms.

we pretty much use mushy compost exclusively it is affordable and easy
to get, have you seen our latest project on our site?

i ahve read a lot of comment that is sort of against mushy but for us
those things never happen, we are growing summe crops in our beds
(just started last autumn) after a full crop of brassicas still with
some cabbages to come and silverbeet still abound from the plants
first planted in the autumn.

we use hay mulches and add our kitchen scraps under the mulch so this
all feeds the agrden along with when a crop is finished the remains
gets pulled and broken up roughly (no shredder this time) and laid
back on that spot and covered with mulch, now next autumn i reckon
we'll be adding more mushy on top of what is there and mulching that
and on we go.

On Thu, 19 Oct 2006 23:51:18 +1300, "George.com"
wrote:


"gardenlen" wrote in message
.. .

snipped
With peace and brightest of blessings,

len

--
"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

http://www.gardenlen.com
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Old 20-10-2006, 10:03 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"gardenlen" wrote in message
...
g'day rob,

you can send the rain anytime you like mate, we will welcome it with
open arms.

we pretty much use mushy compost exclusively it is affordable and easy
to get, have you seen our latest project on our site?

i ahve read a lot of comment that is sort of against mushy but for us
those things never happen,


salt content? I have read certain comment but that surely would depend on
from what the compost is made.

rob


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Old 20-10-2006, 09:18 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens

g'day george,

pretty much all mushroom compost straight from the farm i would expect
to be the same/similar product, so what may be in one i would expect
to find in another.

i have read that some say there are ph problems, but so far in all the
years we have used it all things have grown well, the pictures on our
page must show that? and the end result product as well.

salt is probably in everything even the natural landscape, and salt is
bandied around as someway to influence chat eg.,. there is a recipe on
our site to make liquid detergent for clothes etc.,. i contains 1 cup
of washing soda (salt), i've had people target that cup of salt (mind
you when the regular off the shelf items don't even list salt), and
say that this is not good to recycle in the garden.

we ahve used our grey water for over a decade even with off the shelf
items, and no problems as all our plants are always healthy.

and at the end of the day it leaves me pondering how one cup of salt
in 20 litres of product distributed through 6,400 litres of end
product grey water, spread over a whole garden. and our worm
populations have always been very good you don't get good results
without them.

how many gardenrs use fertilisers that contain sulphate? lots and lots
i would say, a scientific person once pointed out to me that when you
mix water with sulphate you get sulphuric acid, and those products
that contain that for the main probably have anyhwere between 5% & 20%
max of the other active ingredients.

so i guess i said all that to say observations and results just don't
support the negative camps theories.



On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 21:03:14 +1300, "George.com"
wrote:

snipped
With peace and brightest of blessings,

len

--
"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

http://www.gardenlen.com
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Old 20-10-2006, 11:57 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Water restrictions and gardens


Every ounce of our used water goes back into our ground as we have a
Septech treatment plant. Treated waste (black & grey water) is
dispersed via dripper lines - it's clean and clear enough to even
provide a veggie garden with but it is not recommended but really you
could. Nearly every property in our area has these and it's always
green wherever one is installed.

Some builders of new homes are now incorporating treatment plants and I
certainly don't know whether you can have one on your average suburban
block but on a bigger block I think every new house should seriously
consider treating their own waste and it's worth considering putting
them into older existing dwellings/properties. If most people did this
it would be an enormous help re our water problems. Our water needs to
be valued like liquid gold.
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