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Old 05-12-2006, 04:11 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 13
Default Isn't it funny how...

TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

TG'sFM wrote:

Oz wrote:

"HeadRush" ( . )( . wrote in message
...

"^T^" wrote in message
...

TG'sFM wrote:

wrote:

...everyone's lawn is dry and yellowing due to water restructions,
except for your neighbours which is in pristine condition? It looks
like a ****ing golf course next door.

Maybe you neighbour has different grass than the others. There are
species like "Sir Walter" which don't need any water other than dew to
keep it green and healthy all year round. He may also have water
crystals or other form of wetting agent under the lawn to retain what
moisture it does get. So in other words, your neighbour may have
learned to "manage" the water restructions, while you and your ilk have
not. So if you want a pristine lawn like your neighbour, stop
complaining and get off your backside and do something about it.

Another management tool for a nice lawn is only water once a week, if
you water it too often the roots get lazy and stay shallow but if water
once a week they grow deeper looking for water giving you a stronger
lawn.

Is Sir Walter as good as they say it is?? I saw an ad for it last week
saying it could go months without water and was as drought resistant as a
gum tree.

Compacted soil is a major problem in lawn maintenance. I've seen lawns die
because the soil was so compacted it felt like concrete - water could not
permeate deep into the soil and root growth was restructed.

Aerating the lawn using a spiked lawn aerator helps loosen the soil around
the roots promoting strong root growth and exposes the root to oxygen. A
sprinkle of nitrogenous fertilizer afterwards and a weekly watering will
do wonders. Also, never mow your lawn too short - might look good, but you
remove vital sun absorbing green leaf which feeds the grass through
photosynthesis.

and mowing your lawn too short also increases the amount of direct sunlight
that is able to hit your top soil, thus creating more evaporation, causing
your lawn to dry out faster, this is one of the benefits of having a
mulching mower :-)

Everyone's an expert it seems. Mulching mowers should be outlawed.
Cut grass needs to be caught in a catcher, left to die, and THEN used
as mulch. If you use a mulching mower, the cut grass does MORE DAMAGE
THAN GOOD, as it drains the soil of the good nuitrients.

You're either ignorant or trying to be a smart arse. Mulching mowers
deposit the finely cut grass back into the lawn where it decomposes,
nourishes, and fertilizes it, and provides covering for any exposed soil
to help with moisture retention. Besides.. mulching mowers avoid the
necessity to keep stopping to empty the catcher. So they're great for
lazy bums like me.


Sorry, but you are wong on this one. Mulching mowers are NOT good for
your grass. Just think about it for a tick. If it was good, then why
wouldn't mowing contractors do it? After all, it'd save them trips to
the dump, plus if it's so good for the lawn, it would grow quicker
which would mean more mowing jobs. But they don't do they? Here's
something else I bet you don't know. Most mowing contractors use a
Honda Buffallo self-propelled mower. They actually come with a
mulching kit as an option, yet in all my years, I have never, ever seen
a single contractor take up that option. The reason? Freshly cut
grass is NOT a good mulch. In fact, it is bad because it draws badly
need nutrients from the soil. In fact, most plants act in this way.
If a plant thinks it is dying, it will try desperately to reproduce or
grow. That is why shrubs thrive after you cut them back, and why fruit
trees flower after being trimmed.


Well that sounds good in theory, except that the mulch produced from
mulching mowers is extremely fine. It is NOT 'freshly cut grass' as such.

Now be a good boy and stick to a
subject that you have at least SOME knowledge about. That is all.



"Mulching mowers feature a patented four swing-back blade system which
works like a fan, drawing the cut grass in from the blade tips. As they
mulch, these mowers return rich nutrients from the fine grass clippings
back into your lawn to promote lush, green growth without the need for
blood & bone or other products. So you'll get a great lawn and save on
fertilisers too! What's more, mulching reduces evaporation, which is so
important in todays environment! "

http://www.victa.com.au/index.cfm?p=...81C657C866099B

"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn. For this reason, it makes more sense for most urban and suburban
homeowners to use a mulching mower, rather than bagging their grass
clippings and dumping them in the compost pile."

http://landscaping.about.com/cs/gift...ing_mowers.htm

"Using a mulching mower saves in several ways. It saves time, since you
don't have to repeatedly stop the mower to empty and reattach the bag.
It saves money, since the nitrogen in the clippings fertilizes the lawn,
reducing the amount of supplemental fertilizer you have to apply."

http://www.hometips.com/help/gardene.html

"Mulching mowers are made to chop grass into fine pieces that drop down
into the mowed turf that remains. The result is a clean-looking lawn
with no visible clippings. The clippings that drop into the turf dry out
and quickly decompose."

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...88/ai_12400799


Just a sample of the hundreds (thousands?) of articles that can be found
supporting my comments. But hey, everyone else could be wrong, and you
could be right! But we've (we've?) yet to see any proof that you are.





--

rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/
'Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines'



  #2   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 04:28 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 12
Default Isn't it funny how...


lynx wrote:
TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

TG'sFM wrote:

Oz wrote:

"HeadRush" ( . )( . wrote in message
...

"^T^" wrote in message
...

TG'sFM wrote:

wrote:

...everyone's lawn is dry and yellowing due to water restructions,
except for your neighbours which is in pristine condition? It looks
like a ****ing golf course next door.

Maybe you neighbour has different grass than the others. There are
species like "Sir Walter" which don't need any water other than dew to
keep it green and healthy all year round. He may also have water
crystals or other form of wetting agent under the lawn to retain what
moisture it does get. So in other words, your neighbour may have
learned to "manage" the water restructions, while you and your ilk have
not. So if you want a pristine lawn like your neighbour, stop
complaining and get off your backside and do something about it.

Another management tool for a nice lawn is only water once a week, if
you water it too often the roots get lazy and stay shallow but if water
once a week they grow deeper looking for water giving you a stronger
lawn.

Is Sir Walter as good as they say it is?? I saw an ad for it last week
saying it could go months without water and was as drought resistant as a
gum tree.

Compacted soil is a major problem in lawn maintenance. I've seen lawns die
because the soil was so compacted it felt like concrete - water could not
permeate deep into the soil and root growth was restructed.

Aerating the lawn using a spiked lawn aerator helps loosen the soil around
the roots promoting strong root growth and exposes the root to oxygen. A
sprinkle of nitrogenous fertilizer afterwards and a weekly watering will
do wonders. Also, never mow your lawn too short - might look good, but you
remove vital sun absorbing green leaf which feeds the grass through
photosynthesis.

and mowing your lawn too short also increases the amount of direct sunlight
that is able to hit your top soil, thus creating more evaporation, causing
your lawn to dry out faster, this is one of the benefits of having a
mulching mower :-)

Everyone's an expert it seems. Mulching mowers should be outlawed.
Cut grass needs to be caught in a catcher, left to die, and THEN used
as mulch. If you use a mulching mower, the cut grass does MORE DAMAGE
THAN GOOD, as it drains the soil of the good nuitrients.

You're either ignorant or trying to be a smart arse. Mulching mowers
deposit the finely cut grass back into the lawn where it decomposes,
nourishes, and fertilizes it, and provides covering for any exposed soil
to help with moisture retention. Besides.. mulching mowers avoid the
necessity to keep stopping to empty the catcher. So they're great for
lazy bums like me.


Sorry, but you are wong on this one. Mulching mowers are NOT good for
your grass. Just think about it for a tick. If it was good, then why
wouldn't mowing contractors do it? After all, it'd save them trips to
the dump, plus if it's so good for the lawn, it would grow quicker
which would mean more mowing jobs. But they don't do they? Here's
something else I bet you don't know. Most mowing contractors use a
Honda Buffallo self-propelled mower. They actually come with a
mulching kit as an option, yet in all my years, I have never, ever seen
a single contractor take up that option. The reason? Freshly cut
grass is NOT a good mulch. In fact, it is bad because it draws badly
need nutrients from the soil. In fact, most plants act in this way.
If a plant thinks it is dying, it will try desperately to reproduce or
grow. That is why shrubs thrive after you cut them back, and why fruit
trees flower after being trimmed.


Well that sounds good in theory, except that the mulch produced from
mulching mowers is extremely fine. It is NOT 'freshly cut grass' as such.

Now be a good boy and stick to a
subject that you have at least SOME knowledge about. That is all.



"Mulching mowers feature a patented four swing-back blade system which
works like a fan, drawing the cut grass in from the blade tips. As they
mulch, these mowers return rich nutrients from the fine grass clippings
back into your lawn to promote lush, green growth without the need for
blood & bone or other products. So you'll get a great lawn and save on
fertilisers too! What's more, mulching reduces evaporation, which is so
important in todays environment! "

http://www.victa.com.au/index.cfm?p=...81C657C866099B

"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn. For this reason, it makes more sense for most urban and suburban
homeowners to use a mulching mower, rather than bagging their grass
clippings and dumping them in the compost pile."

http://landscaping.about.com/cs/gift...ing_mowers.htm

"Using a mulching mower saves in several ways. It saves time, since you
don't have to repeatedly stop the mower to empty and reattach the bag.
It saves money, since the nitrogen in the clippings fertilizes the lawn,
reducing the amount of supplemental fertilizer you have to apply."

http://www.hometips.com/help/gardene.html

"Mulching mowers are made to chop grass into fine pieces that drop down
into the mowed turf that remains. The result is a clean-looking lawn
with no visible clippings. The clippings that drop into the turf dry out
and quickly decompose."

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...88/ai_12400799


Just a sample of the hundreds (thousands?) of articles that can be found
supporting my comments. But hey, everyone else could be wrong, and you
could be right! But we've (we've?) yet to see any proof that you are.


So if it's so good, how come mowing contractors don't use mulch mowers?

  #3   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 04:37 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 1
Default Isn't it funny how...


"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...

lynx wrote:
TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

TG'sFM wrote:

Oz wrote:

"HeadRush" ( . )( . wrote in message
...

"^T^" wrote in message
...

TG'sFM wrote:

wrote:

...everyone's lawn is dry and yellowing due to water
restructions,
except for your neighbours which is in pristine condition? It
looks
like a ****ing golf course next door.

Maybe you neighbour has different grass than the others. There
are
species like "Sir Walter" which don't need any water other than
dew to
keep it green and healthy all year round. He may also have water
crystals or other form of wetting agent under the lawn to retain
what
moisture it does get. So in other words, your neighbour may have
learned to "manage" the water restructions, while you and your
ilk have
not. So if you want a pristine lawn like your neighbour, stop
complaining and get off your backside and do something about it.

Another management tool for a nice lawn is only water once a week,
if
you water it too often the roots get lazy and stay shallow but if
water
once a week they grow deeper looking for water giving you a
stronger
lawn.

Is Sir Walter as good as they say it is?? I saw an ad for it last
week
saying it could go months without water and was as drought
resistant as a
gum tree.

Compacted soil is a major problem in lawn maintenance. I've seen
lawns die
because the soil was so compacted it felt like concrete - water
could not
permeate deep into the soil and root growth was restructed.

Aerating the lawn using a spiked lawn aerator helps loosen the soil
around
the roots promoting strong root growth and exposes the root to
oxygen. A
sprinkle of nitrogenous fertilizer afterwards and a weekly watering
will
do wonders. Also, never mow your lawn too short - might look good,
but you
remove vital sun absorbing green leaf which feeds the grass through

  #4   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 05:19 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 11
Default Isn't it funny how...

takes nitrogen out then releases it again.
Ive been using one of these mulching mowers for years, but with water
restrictions etc, wish I had a lawn.
As far as a better lawn is concerend, I dont think it makes much diference.
"Jen" wrote in message
...

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...


"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn.


Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason
compost/grass clippings should be composted first.

As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.


Jen



  #5   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 05:20 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
Jen Jen is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 85
Default Isn't it funny how...


"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...


"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn.


Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason compost/grass
clippings should be composted first.

As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.


Jen




  #6   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 05:23 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 3
Default Isn't it funny how...

My lawn is pretty green too - i use ALL my grey water from washing machine
(front loader), shower (yes, savers) and rinse water from the kitchen sink
on the grass and plants etc. Adds up to quite a lot, and everything's
thriving, tho i did change my washing powder to phosphate free 'green care'
liquid - aus made, and works great.


"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...

lynx wrote:
TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

TG'sFM wrote:

Oz wrote:

"HeadRush" ( . )( . wrote in message
...

"^T^" wrote in message
...

TG'sFM wrote:

wrote:

...everyone's lawn is dry and yellowing due to water
restructions,
except for your neighbours which is in pristine condition? It
looks
like a ****ing golf course next door.

Maybe you neighbour has different grass than the others. There
are
species like "Sir Walter" which don't need any water other than
dew to
keep it green and healthy all year round. He may also have water
crystals or other form of wetting agent under the lawn to retain
what
moisture it does get. So in other words, your neighbour may have
learned to "manage" the water restructions, while you and your
ilk have
not. So if you want a pristine lawn like your neighbour, stop
complaining and get off your backside and do something about it.

Another management tool for a nice lawn is only water once a week,
if
you water it too often the roots get lazy and stay shallow but if
water
once a week they grow deeper looking for water giving you a
stronger
lawn.

Is Sir Walter as good as they say it is?? I saw an ad for it last
week
saying it could go months without water and was as drought
resistant as a
gum tree.

Compacted soil is a major problem in lawn maintenance. I've seen
lawns die
because the soil was so compacted it felt like concrete - water
could not
permeate deep into the soil and root growth was restructed.

Aerating the lawn using a spiked lawn aerator helps loosen the soil
around
the roots promoting strong root growth and exposes the root to
oxygen. A
sprinkle of nitrogenous fertilizer afterwards and a weekly watering
will
do wonders. Also, never mow your lawn too short - might look good,
but you
remove vital sun absorbing green leaf which feeds the grass through
photosynthesis.

and mowing your lawn too short also increases the amount of direct
sunlight
that is able to hit your top soil, thus creating more evaporation,
causing
your lawn to dry out faster, this is one of the benefits of having a
mulching mower :-)

Everyone's an expert it seems. Mulching mowers should be outlawed.
Cut grass needs to be caught in a catcher, left to die, and THEN used
as mulch. If you use a mulching mower, the cut grass does MORE
DAMAGE
THAN GOOD, as it drains the soil of the good nuitrients.

You're either ignorant or trying to be a smart arse. Mulching mowers
deposit the finely cut grass back into the lawn where it decomposes,
nourishes, and fertilizes it, and provides covering for any exposed
soil
to help with moisture retention. Besides.. mulching mowers avoid the
necessity to keep stopping to empty the catcher. So they're great for
lazy bums like me.


Sorry, but you are wong on this one. Mulching mowers are NOT good for
your grass. Just think about it for a tick. If it was good, then why
wouldn't mowing contractors do it? After all, it'd save them trips to
the dump, plus if it's so good for the lawn, it would grow quicker
which would mean more mowing jobs. But they don't do they? Here's
something else I bet you don't know. Most mowing contractors use a
Honda Buffallo self-propelled mower. They actually come with a
mulching kit as an option, yet in all my years, I have never, ever seen
a single contractor take up that option. The reason? Freshly cut
grass is NOT a good mulch. In fact, it is bad because it draws badly
need nutrients from the soil. In fact, most plants act in this way.
If a plant thinks it is dying, it will try desperately to reproduce or
grow. That is why shrubs thrive after you cut them back, and why fruit
trees flower after being trimmed.


Well that sounds good in theory, except that the mulch produced from
mulching mowers is extremely fine. It is NOT 'freshly cut grass' as such.

Now be a good boy and stick to a
subject that you have at least SOME knowledge about. That is all.



"Mulching mowers feature a patented four swing-back blade system which
works like a fan, drawing the cut grass in from the blade tips. As they
mulch, these mowers return rich nutrients from the fine grass clippings
back into your lawn to promote lush, green growth without the need for
blood & bone or other products. So you'll get a great lawn and save on
fertilisers too! What's more, mulching reduces evaporation, which is so
important in todays environment! "

http://www.victa.com.au/index.cfm?p=...81C657C866099B

"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn. For this reason, it makes more sense for most urban and suburban
homeowners to use a mulching mower, rather than bagging their grass
clippings and dumping them in the compost pile."

http://landscaping.about.com/cs/gift...ing_mowers.htm

"Using a mulching mower saves in several ways. It saves time, since you
don't have to repeatedly stop the mower to empty and reattach the bag.
It saves money, since the nitrogen in the clippings fertilizes the lawn,
reducing the amount of supplemental fertilizer you have to apply."

http://www.hometips.com/help/gardene.html

"Mulching mowers are made to chop grass into fine pieces that drop down
into the mowed turf that remains. The result is a clean-looking lawn
with no visible clippings. The clippings that drop into the turf dry out
and quickly decompose."

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...88/ai_12400799


Just a sample of the hundreds (thousands?) of articles that can be found
supporting my comments. But hey, everyone else could be wrong, and you
could be right! But we've (we've?) yet to see any proof that you are.


So if it's so good, how come mowing contractors don't use mulch mowers?



  #7   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 05:29 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 13
Default Isn't it funny how...

TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

TG'sFM wrote:

Oz wrote:

"HeadRush" ( . )( . wrote in message
...

"^T^" wrote in message
...

TG'sFM wrote:

wrote:

...everyone's lawn is dry and yellowing due to water restructions,
except for your neighbours which is in pristine condition? It looks
like a ****ing golf course next door.

Maybe you neighbour has different grass than the others. There are
species like "Sir Walter" which don't need any water other than dew to
keep it green and healthy all year round. He may also have water
crystals or other form of wetting agent under the lawn to retain what
moisture it does get. So in other words, your neighbour may have
learned to "manage" the water restructions, while you and your ilk have
not. So if you want a pristine lawn like your neighbour, stop
complaining and get off your backside and do something about it.

Another management tool for a nice lawn is only water once a week, if
you water it too often the roots get lazy and stay shallow but if water
once a week they grow deeper looking for water giving you a stronger
lawn.

Is Sir Walter as good as they say it is?? I saw an ad for it last week
saying it could go months without water and was as drought resistant as a
gum tree.

Compacted soil is a major problem in lawn maintenance. I've seen lawns die
because the soil was so compacted it felt like concrete - water could not
permeate deep into the soil and root growth was restructed.

Aerating the lawn using a spiked lawn aerator helps loosen the soil around
the roots promoting strong root growth and exposes the root to oxygen. A
sprinkle of nitrogenous fertilizer afterwards and a weekly watering will
do wonders. Also, never mow your lawn too short - might look good, but you
remove vital sun absorbing green leaf which feeds the grass through
photosynthesis.

and mowing your lawn too short also increases the amount of direct sunlight
that is able to hit your top soil, thus creating more evaporation, causing
your lawn to dry out faster, this is one of the benefits of having a
mulching mower :-)

Everyone's an expert it seems. Mulching mowers should be outlawed.
Cut grass needs to be caught in a catcher, left to die, and THEN used
as mulch. If you use a mulching mower, the cut grass does MORE DAMAGE
THAN GOOD, as it drains the soil of the good nuitrients.

You're either ignorant or trying to be a smart arse. Mulching mowers
deposit the finely cut grass back into the lawn where it decomposes,
nourishes, and fertilizes it, and provides covering for any exposed soil
to help with moisture retention. Besides.. mulching mowers avoid the
necessity to keep stopping to empty the catcher. So they're great for
lazy bums like me.

Sorry, but you are wong on this one. Mulching mowers are NOT good for
your grass. Just think about it for a tick. If it was good, then why
wouldn't mowing contractors do it? After all, it'd save them trips to
the dump, plus if it's so good for the lawn, it would grow quicker
which would mean more mowing jobs. But they don't do they? Here's
something else I bet you don't know. Most mowing contractors use a
Honda Buffallo self-propelled mower. They actually come with a
mulching kit as an option, yet in all my years, I have never, ever seen
a single contractor take up that option. The reason? Freshly cut
grass is NOT a good mulch. In fact, it is bad because it draws badly
need nutrients from the soil. In fact, most plants act in this way.
If a plant thinks it is dying, it will try desperately to reproduce or
grow. That is why shrubs thrive after you cut them back, and why fruit
trees flower after being trimmed.

Well that sounds good in theory, except that the mulch produced from
mulching mowers is extremely fine. It is NOT 'freshly cut grass' as such.

Now be a good boy and stick to a
subject that you have at least SOME knowledge about. That is all.

"Mulching mowers feature a patented four swing-back blade system which
works like a fan, drawing the cut grass in from the blade tips. As they
mulch, these mowers return rich nutrients from the fine grass clippings
back into your lawn to promote lush, green growth without the need for
blood & bone or other products. So you'll get a great lawn and save on
fertilisers too! What's more, mulching reduces evaporation, which is so
important in todays environment! "

http://www.victa.com.au/index.cfm?p=...81C657C866099B

"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn. For this reason, it makes more sense for most urban and suburban
homeowners to use a mulching mower, rather than bagging their grass
clippings and dumping them in the compost pile."

http://landscaping.about.com/cs/gift...ing_mowers.htm

"Using a mulching mower saves in several ways. It saves time, since you
don't have to repeatedly stop the mower to empty and reattach the bag.
It saves money, since the nitrogen in the clippings fertilizes the lawn,
reducing the amount of supplemental fertilizer you have to apply."

http://www.hometips.com/help/gardene.html

"Mulching mowers are made to chop grass into fine pieces that drop down
into the mowed turf that remains. The result is a clean-looking lawn
with no visible clippings. The clippings that drop into the turf dry out
and quickly decompose."

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...88/ai_12400799


Just a sample of the hundreds (thousands?) of articles that can be found
supporting my comments. But hey, everyone else could be wrong, and you
could be right! But we've (we've?) yet to see any proof that you are.


So if it's so good, how come mowing contractors don't use mulch mowers?



I have no idea. I haven't canvassed mowing contractors, and I only have
your word that they don't.


--

rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/
'When things just can't get any worse, they will!'


  #8   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 06:19 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 12
Default Isn't it funny how...


Jen wrote:
"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...


"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn.


Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason compost/grass
clippings should be composted first.

As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.


That's correct, yet our resident member of The Australian Society of
Horticultural Science doesn't even know the basics it seems.

  #9   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 06:20 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 12
Default Isn't it funny how...


lynx wrote:
TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

TG'sFM wrote:

Oz wrote:

"HeadRush" ( . )( . wrote in message
...

"^T^" wrote in message
...

TG'sFM wrote:

wrote:

...everyone's lawn is dry and yellowing due to water restructions,
except for your neighbours which is in pristine condition? It looks
like a ****ing golf course next door.

Maybe you neighbour has different grass than the others. There are
species like "Sir Walter" which don't need any water other than dew to
keep it green and healthy all year round. He may also have water
crystals or other form of wetting agent under the lawn to retain what
moisture it does get. So in other words, your neighbour may have
learned to "manage" the water restructions, while you and your ilk have
not. So if you want a pristine lawn like your neighbour, stop
complaining and get off your backside and do something about it.

Another management tool for a nice lawn is only water once a week, if
you water it too often the roots get lazy and stay shallow but if water
once a week they grow deeper looking for water giving you a stronger
lawn.

Is Sir Walter as good as they say it is?? I saw an ad for it last week
saying it could go months without water and was as drought resistant as a
gum tree.

Compacted soil is a major problem in lawn maintenance. I've seen lawns die
because the soil was so compacted it felt like concrete - water could not
permeate deep into the soil and root growth was restructed.

Aerating the lawn using a spiked lawn aerator helps loosen the soil around
the roots promoting strong root growth and exposes the root to oxygen. A
sprinkle of nitrogenous fertilizer afterwards and a weekly watering will
do wonders. Also, never mow your lawn too short - might look good, but you
remove vital sun absorbing green leaf which feeds the grass through
photosynthesis.

and mowing your lawn too short also increases the amount of direct sunlight
that is able to hit your top soil, thus creating more evaporation, causing
your lawn to dry out faster, this is one of the benefits of having a
mulching mower :-)

Everyone's an expert it seems. Mulching mowers should be outlawed.
Cut grass needs to be caught in a catcher, left to die, and THEN used
as mulch. If you use a mulching mower, the cut grass does MORE DAMAGE
THAN GOOD, as it drains the soil of the good nuitrients.

You're either ignorant or trying to be a smart arse. Mulching mowers
deposit the finely cut grass back into the lawn where it decomposes,
nourishes, and fertilizes it, and provides covering for any exposed soil
to help with moisture retention. Besides.. mulching mowers avoid the
necessity to keep stopping to empty the catcher. So they're great for
lazy bums like me.

Sorry, but you are wong on this one. Mulching mowers are NOT good for
your grass. Just think about it for a tick. If it was good, then why
wouldn't mowing contractors do it? After all, it'd save them trips to
the dump, plus if it's so good for the lawn, it would grow quicker
which would mean more mowing jobs. But they don't do they? Here's
something else I bet you don't know. Most mowing contractors use a
Honda Buffallo self-propelled mower. They actually come with a
mulching kit as an option, yet in all my years, I have never, ever seen
a single contractor take up that option. The reason? Freshly cut
grass is NOT a good mulch. In fact, it is bad because it draws badly
need nutrients from the soil. In fact, most plants act in this way.
If a plant thinks it is dying, it will try desperately to reproduce or
grow. That is why shrubs thrive after you cut them back, and why fruit
trees flower after being trimmed.

Well that sounds good in theory, except that the mulch produced from
mulching mowers is extremely fine. It is NOT 'freshly cut grass' as such.

Now be a good boy and stick to a
subject that you have at least SOME knowledge about. That is all.

"Mulching mowers feature a patented four swing-back blade system which
works like a fan, drawing the cut grass in from the blade tips. As they
mulch, these mowers return rich nutrients from the fine grass clippings
back into your lawn to promote lush, green growth without the need for
blood & bone or other products. So you'll get a great lawn and save on
fertilisers too! What's more, mulching reduces evaporation, which is so
important in todays environment! "

http://www.victa.com.au/index.cfm?p=...81C657C866099B

"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn. For this reason, it makes more sense for most urban and suburban
homeowners to use a mulching mower, rather than bagging their grass
clippings and dumping them in the compost pile."

http://landscaping.about.com/cs/gift...ing_mowers.htm

"Using a mulching mower saves in several ways. It saves time, since you
don't have to repeatedly stop the mower to empty and reattach the bag.
It saves money, since the nitrogen in the clippings fertilizes the lawn,
reducing the amount of supplemental fertilizer you have to apply."

http://www.hometips.com/help/gardene.html

"Mulching mowers are made to chop grass into fine pieces that drop down
into the mowed turf that remains. The result is a clean-looking lawn
with no visible clippings. The clippings that drop into the turf dry out
and quickly decompose."

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...88/ai_12400799


Just a sample of the hundreds (thousands?) of articles that can be found
supporting my comments. But hey, everyone else could be wrong, and you
could be right! But we've (we've?) yet to see any proof that you are.


So if it's so good, how come mowing contractors don't use mulch mowers?



I have no idea. I haven't canvassed mowing contractors, and I only have
your word that they don't.


My good word is all that's required.

  #10   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 06:33 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Default Isn't it funny how...

Jen wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...


"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn.


Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason compost/grass
clippings should be composted first.


We're not talking about compost or grass clippings tho. The mulch
produced by mulching mowers is extremely fine. It doesn't need composting.

As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.


Jen





--

rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/
'Windows: The triumph of marketing over technology'




  #11   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 06:35 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Posts: 12
Default Isn't it funny how...


lynx wrote:
Jen wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...


"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn.


Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason compost/grass
clippings should be composted first.


As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.


We're not talking about compost or grass clippings tho. The mulch
produced by mulching mowers is extremely fine. It doesn't need composting.


Look who's backpedalling now. It doesn't matter how fine it is, it is
still bad for the lawn. Besides, if you cut 1 inch off your grass, the
mulching mower will at best produce two (2) equal half inch pieces of
grass. And we won't even go off on a tangent about how the lawn will
then require dethatching every few months if you do this - otherwise
you are going to have to mow your "lawn" higher and higher each time.

  #12   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 06:37 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Default Isn't it funny how...


lynx wrote:
imorf wrote:

ros wrote:
My lawn is pretty green too - i use ALL my grey water from washing
machine (front loader), shower (yes, savers) and rinse water from the
kitchen sink on the grass and plants etc. Adds up to quite a lot,
and everything's thriving, tho i did change my washing powder to
phosphate free 'green care' liquid - aus made, and works great.


/pat on the back.


Meanwhile industry uses how many thousands/millions of litres daily?


It's a renewable resource, so who gives a **** as to how much industry
use. It's not as though we are going to run out.

  #13   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 06:38 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Posts: 13
Default Isn't it funny how...

imorf wrote:

ros wrote:
My lawn is pretty green too - i use ALL my grey water from washing
machine (front loader), shower (yes, savers) and rinse water from the
kitchen sink on the grass and plants etc. Adds up to quite a lot,
and everything's thriving, tho i did change my washing powder to
phosphate free 'green care' liquid - aus made, and works great.


/pat on the back.


Meanwhile industry uses how many thousands/millions of litres daily?


--

rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/
'Who are all these kids, and why are they calling me daddy??'


  #14   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 06:42 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Posts: 3
Default Isn't it funny how...

i know... but i can't do NOTHING just because business is water expensive.
that will change eventually, i hope...

it's not always convenient to do the washing machine/grey water thing, esp
at night, but i have it draining into a big rubbish bin, from which i syphon
it when it suits me... and i'm sick of tripping over buckets in the shower
but when those buckets provide all the water i need for several shrubs, it
sort of seems worthwhile...

i dunno, perhaps it just makes me feel better, and that can't be a bad thing
)


"lynx" wrote in message
...
imorf wrote:

ros wrote:
My lawn is pretty green too - i use ALL my grey water from washing
machine (front loader), shower (yes, savers) and rinse water from the
kitchen sink on the grass and plants etc. Adds up to quite a lot, and
everything's thriving, tho i did change my washing powder to phosphate
free 'green care' liquid - aus made, and works great.


/pat on the back.


Meanwhile industry uses how many thousands/millions of litres daily?


--

rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/
'Who are all these kids, and why are they calling me daddy??'




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Old 05-12-2006, 06:42 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Default Isn't it funny how...

thank you *preen*

"imorf" wrote in message
...
ros wrote:
My lawn is pretty green too - i use ALL my grey water from washing
machine (front loader), shower (yes, savers) and rinse water from the
kitchen sink on the grass and plants etc. Adds up to quite a lot, and
everything's thriving, tho i did change my washing powder to phosphate
free 'green care' liquid - aus made, and works great.


/pat on the back.





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