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Old 20-04-2007, 12:32 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default compost problem

"0tterbot" wrote in message
"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message


i know there's two schools of thought on poo: one is that all poo is good
(that would be me)


In just a few words :-)

Cow manure is considered safe and excellent for compost or direct in
the garden but most dogs receive medications periodically to rid them
of parasites and the medications can also kill compost worms. So first
off there is a withholding period when dog poo can't be added to the
worm farm.


but you can add the poo later after it's sat for a while, if you are
concerned :-) also, medications have changed - this may no longer be true
in all cases. (well, i know horse medications have changed - one would
need to find out concerning dog medication specifically).


Dog dewormer has the active ingredient called fenbendazole. Compost worms
are called Eisenia fetida. If you do a google or vivisimo search on these
two search criteria, I'd be most interested if you can manage to find
anything to worry about. I couldn't.

I had no luck finding anything of a scientific nature that suggested there
was any chance of the worm farm worms being killed by any of the common
vermicides applied at the recommended dosage rates.

The only really negative info I found related to Ivomectin and in that case,
it seems that you'd need to overdose the animal (not a dog) to the point of
death with Ivomectin (which isn't a dog dewormer) to have any affect on soil
earthworms at all.

This may interest you
http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=15216554


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Old 20-04-2007, 09:38 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default compost problem

"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message
On Fri, 20 Apr 2007 08:32:06 +1000, "FarmI" ask@itshall be given
wrote:

"0tterbot" wrote in message
"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message


i know there's two schools of thought on poo: one is that all poo is
good
(that would be me)


In just a few words :-)

Cow manure is considered safe and excellent for compost or direct in
the garden but most dogs receive medications periodically to rid them
of parasites and the medications can also kill compost worms. So first
off there is a withholding period when dog poo can't be added to the
worm farm.

but you can add the poo later after it's sat for a while, if you are
concerned :-) also, medications have changed - this may no longer be
true
in all cases. (well, i know horse medications have changed - one would
need to find out concerning dog medication specifically).


Dog dewormer has the active ingredient called fenbendazole. Compost worms
are called Eisenia fetida. If you do a google or vivisimo search on these
two search criteria, I'd be most interested if you can manage to find
anything to worry about. I couldn't.


The medications I'm currently giving to my dogs on a monthly basis
contain praziquartel


Are you sure it isn't praziquantel????? That is the most common treatment
for dogs in farming areas to prevent tapeworm, specifically the hydatid
tapeworm. It works on most worms but not heartworm AFAIK. Are you in a
farming area?

and milbemycin as the active constituents to
prevent heartworm and control all the other worms that usually infest
dogs. Previously they had diethylcarbamazine citrate daily to prevent
heartworm.


The milbemycin is the heartworm treatment for dogs which return a negative
test.

I had no luck finding anything of a scientific nature that suggested there
was any chance of the worm farm worms being killed by any of the common
vermicides applied at the recommended dosage rates.


The only really negative info I found related to Ivomectin and in that
case,
it seems that you'd need to overdose the animal (not a dog) to the point
of
death with Ivomectin (which isn't a dog dewormer) to have any affect on
soil earthworms at all.


The suppliers of worm farms and compost worms suggest a withholding
period of feeding dog poo after dogs have been treated for worms.


I would too if I was selling them. I did notice when I did a search that
this was the recommendation but I couldn't find any scientific info to back
up their advice. They might be just a bit overcautious but best to be safe
than sorry especially if there is a chance of wormfarmers using it too fresh
on leaf veg.

I was told by a very old professional gardener, that dog shit was brilliant
for fertilising citrus trees. I've never tried it as my dogs poop in the
bushes (except for one of them who was town bred and prefers to do his tiny
poops at the bottom of the steps. All his stuff goes straight into a bucket
and then to the tip when there is a bucket full).

Putting it under a citrus tree would get it out of the way and not
contaminate anything else I should imagine.


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Old 08-03-2011, 09:08 PM
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Hi There
I am new to worm farming and i didnt know where to start but just wanted to give it a go. So thought i would have a search around the internet to see what info was available and couldnt really find much! However i did find a really great book to download which was incredibly informative and really easy to read. Now I am so excited as i have a better understanding as a complete novice and i highly recommend it to anyone starting out.
I found it under this website: Beginners Guide to Starting a Worm Farm

would appreciate any further advice from anyone.

Allotment Lady


Quote:
Originally Posted by 0tterbot View Post
hello,
the first batch of compost i made in my new! tumbling! composter!! was
absolutely tops. this second batch is not going well at all - would anyone
have any thoughts?

at first, it dripped profusely out the holes. then, it heated up. my
goodness!! i had inadvertantly made an incendiary device (don't tell john
howard) and it was actually smoking. i cooled it by turning it often &
leaving the lid off for 4-5 days until it cooled. after it cooled, it
recommenced to drip profusely. now, several weeks later, it's too cold & the
composting stuff has merged into big wet gobs about the size of two fists, i
can't get it heated & the gobs won't break up naturally & to do so with my
hands is extraordinarily unpleasant (whereas i don't normally mind _what_ i
put my hands in, so it's really not nice at all). i added some lime to no
effect. it doesn't smell bad - it just doesn't smell like anything at all
(certainly not that lovely composty smell).

my idea was that tomorrow i'll empty it out & break up the lumps with a
spade, & then put it back in for a while with some more lime & some
partly-decomposed chicken-pooey straw (for carbon with a poo-boost) & see
what it's like after a week. if still no good i might just dump it out to
break down on its own & start again.

does anyone have a better idea? does anyone know what went wrong? i strongly
suspect the materials were just too wet & nitrogenous (iirc it was mainly
fruit peels & such, from the cafe) & not enough carbon, even though there
was quite a bit of paper in there.

thanks for any thoughts!
kylie
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