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Old 13-09-2007, 09:22 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil

I have just been crawling around the back lawn uprooting bindii...

sigh

Two years ago, I would have told you we didn't have any out the back (though a
goodly collection out the front). Last summer, I found a few in the back yard
in the approved manner (tread-ouch!). This spring, they seem to be there in
millions. I thought I'd cleared out the back yard infestation a week ago.
Nup.

When the cockroaches are gone, there will still be bindii!

Tackling the front lawn tomorrow. I have hit the really bad bits with roundup
-- it will be interesting to see the result.

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue

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Old 13-09-2007, 11:43 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil

"Chookie" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I have just been crawling around the back lawn uprooting bindii...

sigh


:-)) We are doing the same with Cape weed whihc is refusing to die even
though it's been nuked with a broadleaf herbicide.

Fun ain't it?

Good luck with your battle.


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Old 14-09-2007, 10:18 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil

"Chookie" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I have just been crawling around the back lawn uprooting bindii...

sigh

Two years ago, I would have told you we didn't have any out the back
(though a
goodly collection out the front). Last summer, I found a few in the back
yard
in the approved manner (tread-ouch!). This spring, they seem to be there
in
millions. I thought I'd cleared out the back yard infestation a week ago.
Nup.

When the cockroaches are gone, there will still be bindii!

Tackling the front lawn tomorrow. I have hit the really bad bits with
roundup
-- it will be interesting to see the result.


fwiw, my mum says the only thing to do with bindii is to blast the bejesus
out of it with a flamethrower. (well, not a flamethrower - you know, those
flamey things).

apparently when i was tiny, our yard was completely infested (i remember we
weren;t allowed out AT ALL with bare feet) & after my pop had bare-earthed
it, there was never a problem again!

of course, very shortly after burning it, you need to sow seed or runners to
cover the spot completely and quickly. without doing that, the process might
not work. :-)

good luck!! the only thing worse than bindiis is cat heads (which i don't
think grow in sydney anyway). those are just AWFUL.
kylie


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Old 14-09-2007, 12:56 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil

0tterbot wrote:
"Chookie" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
I have just been crawling around the back lawn uprooting bindii...

sigh

Two years ago, I would have told you we didn't have any out the back
(though a
goodly collection out the front). Last summer, I found a few in the back
yard
in the approved manner (tread-ouch!). This spring, they seem to be there
in
millions. I thought I'd cleared out the back yard infestation a week ago.
Nup.

When the cockroaches are gone, there will still be bindii!

Tackling the front lawn tomorrow. I have hit the really bad bits with
roundup
-- it will be interesting to see the result.


fwiw, my mum says the only thing to do with bindii is to blast the bejesus
out of it with a flamethrower. (well, not a flamethrower - you know, those
flamey things).

apparently when i was tiny, our yard was completely infested (i remember we
weren;t allowed out AT ALL with bare feet) & after my pop had bare-earthed
it, there was never a problem again!

of course, very shortly after burning it, you need to sow seed or runners to
cover the spot completely and quickly. without doing that, the process might
not work. :-)

good luck!! the only thing worse than bindiis is cat heads (which i don't
think grow in sydney anyway). those are just AWFUL.
kylie


Yeah especially if attached to cats bodies and legs.

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Old 14-09-2007, 02:06 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil

In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:

good luck!! the only thing worse than bindiis is cat heads (which i don't
think grow in sydney anyway). those are just AWFUL.


You can get cat heads in Sydney -- the lawn at my local pool was infested with
them. In fact, it's one of the few places I've seen them. The problem is
that bindii are so small and sneaky. At least when you pull a cat's head out
of your foot, you can see it. The bindie has already dropped off.

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue


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Old 15-09-2007, 04:05 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil

In article .,
Jonno . wrote:

good luck!! the only thing worse than bindiis is cat heads (which i don't
think grow in sydney anyway). those are just AWFUL.

Yeah especially if attached to cats bodies and legs.


Definitely better detached!

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue
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Old 30-09-2007, 10:28 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil

A kettle of boiling water, dribled into the centre of the plant, worked
on mine.

Chookie wrote:
I have just been crawling around the back lawn uprooting bindii...

sigh

Two years ago, I would have told you we didn't have any out the back (though a
goodly collection out the front). Last summer, I found a few in the back yard
in the approved manner (tread-ouch!). This spring, they seem to be there in
millions. I thought I'd cleared out the back yard infestation a week ago.
Nup.

When the cockroaches are gone, there will still be bindii!

Tackling the front lawn tomorrow. I have hit the really bad bits with roundup
-- it will be interesting to see the result.

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Old 01-10-2007, 12:27 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil


"none" ""jules\"@(none)" wrote in message
...
A kettle of boiling water, dribled into the centre of the plant, worked
on mine.

LOL - a little more subtle than DH's method ....
First, remove all lawn with a shovel.
Second, use a flame-thrower and go over entire yard
Thirdly returf yard.

(Before I met him, DH was living in a share house with a few people,
including the house's owner. The yard was wall-to-wall bindies. The owner
decided to pay to have the yard professionally returfed, but DH got involved
in the process and included the use of the flame-thrower into the
proceedings. While it did work, its possibly a little extreme a solution
for most people!)
Amanda


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Old 01-10-2007, 01:48 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil

A steam generator and some copper pipes with delivery holes would do the
same trick, but much more efficiently, as I found a gas blowtorch only
touched the surface, but steam penetrates. Its used in hothouses to
sterilise soils.
But you have to admit it looks great using a flame thrower.
PS where do you get em?
I reckon the local chapter of Hells Angel bikies could have a field day
and I could sell em some....(grin!)


Flowergirl wrote:
"none" ""jules\"@(none)" wrote in message
...
A kettle of boiling water, dribled into the centre of the plant, worked
on mine.

LOL - a little more subtle than DH's method ....
First, remove all lawn with a shovel.
Second, use a flame-thrower and go over entire yard
Thirdly returf yard.

(Before I met him, DH was living in a share house with a few people,
including the house's owner. The yard was wall-to-wall bindies. The owner
decided to pay to have the yard professionally returfed, but DH got involved
in the process and included the use of the flame-thrower into the
proceedings. While it did work, its possibly a little extreme a solution
for most people!)
Amanda


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Old 01-10-2007, 04:46 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 2
Default Plants of Eeeeeeevil


"Jonno" wrote in message
...
A steam generator and some copper pipes with delivery holes would do the
same trick, but much more efficiently, as I found a gas blowtorch only
touched the surface, but steam penetrates. Its used in hothouses to
sterilise soils.
But you have to admit it looks great using a flame thrower.
PS where do you get em?
I reckon the local chapter of Hells Angel bikies could have a field day
and I could sell em some....(grin!)


I suspect that performing the "treatment" was something that DH very much
enjoyed, so its efficiency was probably a secondary concern to the "fun" of
actually doing the job. I do know that there were no bindies in that
particular lawn for at least 6 years after the "treatment" so it did work
quite well.

Dunno where to get a flame thrower.
I suspect that the particular flame thrower in question may have been home
made.... DH is an engineer AND a farm-boy so we have a very large number of
very useful one-off devices for both the home and for the farm (but as DH
admits, they do look very "agricultural" rather than sleek and stylish).
Amanda




Flowergirl wrote:
"none" ""jules\"@(none)" wrote in message
...
A kettle of boiling water, dribled into the centre of the plant, worked
on mine.

LOL - a little more subtle than DH's method ....
First, remove all lawn with a shovel.
Second, use a flame-thrower and go over entire yard
Thirdly returf yard.

(Before I met him, DH was living in a share house with a few people,
including the house's owner. The yard was wall-to-wall bindies. The

owner
decided to pay to have the yard professionally returfed, but DH got

involved
in the process and included the use of the flame-thrower into the
proceedings. While it did work, its possibly a little extreme a

solution
for most people!)
Amanda






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