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Old 21-09-2007, 12:38 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default big old bottlebrushes

we have two big old bottlebrush trees which are not only very thick and
bushy, but also completely wonky. :-)

i get the impression that they've been pruned all down one side for access
to a path, & did not ever grow back in these spots. the rest of them is
growing out all over the place & they just look horrible. however, the tiny
birds like them & live in them so they're staying for now.

is it so that bottlebrush won't grow back where pruned? (in which case,
surely i need to go very carefully..!?). will a bit of tip pruning just to
even out the bushy lumpy bits at the very tips make more bushiness, or
result in never growing back?

i think i need to get them more tree-shaped underneath, & then go carefully
round the bushy parts - would appreciate any tips on this, & any experiences
anyone has with bottlebrushes after pruning. i pruned a little one at our
last house & indeed, nothing seemed to grow back afterwards but i don't
think that particular one was very happy anyway. my big two i have here are
very happy indeed, but just totally ugly :-)
thanks for any tips!!
kylie



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Old 21-09-2007, 02:21 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default big old bottlebrushes

0tterbot wrote:
we have two big old bottlebrush trees which are not only very thick and
bushy, but also completely wonky. :-)

i get the impression that they've been pruned all down one side for access
to a path, & did not ever grow back in these spots. the rest of them is
growing out all over the place & they just look horrible. however, the tiny
birds like them & live in them so they're staying for now.

is it so that bottlebrush won't grow back where pruned? (in which case,
surely i need to go very carefully..!?). will a bit of tip pruning just to
even out the bushy lumpy bits at the very tips make more bushiness, or
result in never growing back?

i think i need to get them more tree-shaped underneath, & then go carefully
round the bushy parts - would appreciate any tips on this, & any experiences
anyone has with bottlebrushes after pruning. i pruned a little one at our
last house & indeed, nothing seemed to grow back afterwards but i don't
think that particular one was very happy anyway. my big two i have here are
very happy indeed, but just totally ugly :-)
thanks for any tips!!
kylie


I have just pruned a bottle brush in out backyard to more manageable
proportions. It does pay to prune them as they grow, as they otherwise
do their own thing, which is very imaginative, but totally without rules.
As far as it growing back, it will, in unexpected places. Providing
shelter is great, so try to keep the birds happy. Keep it thick but
higher up, will do a lot for the birds.
If you're in a windy position keep in mind that they snap rather easily
and will be top heavy if this is not kept in mind.
Depending where you live, if its fairly dry they seem to cope but will
prefer lighter soil and mulch, with some watering in the tough seasons.
Best of luck.
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Old 21-09-2007, 07:41 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default big old bottlebrushes

In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:

i think i need to get them more tree-shaped underneath, & then go carefully
round the bushy parts - would appreciate any tips on this, & any experiences
anyone has with bottlebrushes after pruning. i pruned a little one at our
last house & indeed, nothing seemed to grow back afterwards but i don't
think that particular one was very happy anyway. my big two i have here are
very happy indeed, but just totally ugly :-)
thanks for any tips!!


I believe the usual way to prune them is to chop them off behind the flowers,
once they fade. They aren't supposed to mind pruning at all, and there are
some nicely-shaped ones around this area. I think you are probably right to
prune the lower sections to a tree-shape.

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue
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Old 04-10-2007, 11:44 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default big old bottlebrushes

"Jonno" wrote in message
u...
0tterbot wrote:
we have two big old bottlebrush trees which are not only very thick and
bushy, but also completely wonky. :-)


I have just pruned a bottle brush in out backyard to more manageable
proportions. It does pay to prune them as they grow, as they otherwise do
their own thing, which is very imaginative, but totally without rules.
As far as it growing back, it will, in unexpected places. Providing
shelter is great, so try to keep the birds happy.


the birds make me very happy, so i can return the favour ;-)

Keep it thick but
higher up, will do a lot for the birds.
If you're in a windy position keep in mind that they snap rather easily
and will be top heavy if this is not kept in mind.


hm, must keep this in mind. i keep looking at it & thinking about where to
start.
thanks!
kylie

Depending where you live, if its fairly dry they seem to cope but will
prefer lighter soil and mulch, with some watering in the tough seasons.
Best of luck.



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Old 04-10-2007, 11:46 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default big old bottlebrushes

"Chookie" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:

i think i need to get them more tree-shaped underneath, & then go
carefully
round the bushy parts - would appreciate any tips on this, & any
experiences
anyone has with bottlebrushes after pruning. i pruned a little one at our
last house & indeed, nothing seemed to grow back afterwards but i don't
think that particular one was very happy anyway. my big two i have here
are
very happy indeed, but just totally ugly :-)
thanks for any tips!!


I believe the usual way to prune them is to chop them off behind the
flowers,
once they fade.


well, i can do that. the old flowers are still there. (i simply must do it
before the flowers, and hence the bees, come).

They aren't supposed to mind pruning at all, and there are
some nicely-shaped ones around this area. I think you are probably right
to
prune the lower sections to a tree-shape.


i'm sure i'm right g. still working out where to even begin!! a ladder is
going to be involved.
thanks!
kylie




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