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Old 01-12-2007, 12:39 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?

I have noticed some quite tall (5-20M) trees around the eastern suburbs of
Melbourne that have a deep green foliage with golden grevillea like
flowers that form in strata like bands at different levels. There are many
to be seen ranging from Mitcham to Lilydale.
I have scoured the web for grevillea finding hundreds of species, but most
have pictures that just show the flower, not the tree, making
identification difficult.
It is a spectacular tree that attracts many birds when in flower. I'd like
to add one to my garden.
Regards, Ed.


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Old 01-12-2007, 12:58 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?


"Ed Adamthwaite" wrote in message
...
I have noticed some quite tall (5-20M) trees around the eastern suburbs of
Melbourne that have a deep green foliage with golden grevillea like
flowers that form in strata like bands at different levels. There are many
to be seen ranging from Mitcham to Lilydale.
I have scoured the web for grevillea finding hundreds of species, but most
have pictures that just show the flower, not the tree, making
identification difficult.
It is a spectacular tree that attracts many birds when in flower. I'd like
to add one to my garden.
Regards, Ed.


--
Posted at www.Usenet.com.au


Grevillea robusta I think pics
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=3990&size=2
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml?pc=a&pn=783&size=2

This is getting upto the big stuff in the genus. Most others are shrubs.
Susceptible to sooty mold in WA.

Richard


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Old 01-12-2007, 08:13 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?

could it be silky oak? check it out, may not be a grevillea at all :-)
love and peace,
SyrianPrince
"Loosecanon" wrote in message
...

"Ed Adamthwaite" wrote in message
...
I have noticed some quite tall (5-20M) trees around the eastern suburbs of
Melbourne that have a deep green foliage with golden grevillea like
flowers that form in strata like bands at different levels. There are
many
to be seen ranging from Mitcham to Lilydale.
I have scoured the web for grevillea finding hundreds of species, but
most
have pictures that just show the flower, not the tree, making
identification difficult.
It is a spectacular tree that attracts many birds when in flower. I'd
like
to add one to my garden.
Regards, Ed.


--
Posted at www.Usenet.com.au


Grevillea robusta I think pics
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=3990&size=2
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml?pc=a&pn=783&size=2

This is getting upto the big stuff in the genus. Most others are shrubs.
Susceptible to sooty mold in WA.

Richard



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Old 01-12-2007, 11:48 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?

oops grevillea robusta is a grevillea :-)
"SyrianPrince" wrote in message
...
could it be silky oak? check it out, may not be a grevillea at all :-)
love and peace,
SyrianPrince
"Loosecanon" wrote in message
...

"Ed Adamthwaite" wrote in message
...
I have noticed some quite tall (5-20M) trees around the eastern suburbs
of
Melbourne that have a deep green foliage with golden grevillea like
flowers that form in strata like bands at different levels. There are
many
to be seen ranging from Mitcham to Lilydale.
I have scoured the web for grevillea finding hundreds of species, but
most
have pictures that just show the flower, not the tree, making
identification difficult.
It is a spectacular tree that attracts many birds when in flower. I'd
like
to add one to my garden.
Regards, Ed.


--
Posted at www.Usenet.com.au


Grevillea robusta I think pics
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=3990&size=2
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml?pc=a&pn=783&size=2

This is getting upto the big stuff in the genus. Most others are shrubs.
Susceptible to sooty mold in WA.

Richard





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Old 02-12-2007, 01:41 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?


"Ed Adamthwaite" wrote in message
...
I have noticed some quite tall (5-20M) trees around the eastern suburbs of
Melbourne that have a deep green foliage with golden grevillea like
flowers that form in strata like bands at different levels. There are many
to be seen ranging from Mitcham to Lilydale.
I have scoured the web for grevillea finding hundreds of species, but most
have pictures that just show the flower, not the tree, making
identification difficult.
It is a spectacular tree that attracts many birds when in flower. I'd like
to add one to my garden.
Regards, Ed.


--
Posted at www.Usenet.com.au



Easest way is to contact the local council gardening dept, just
wonder in to the depot, and ask




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Old 02-12-2007, 04:00 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?

Hi Richard,
thank you for the links. They helped me to identify a Grevilea Robusta
(about 5M high)over the road from my place. However although very similar
to the type I am talking about, it doesn't have the stratified bands of
flowers across it's foliage. The flowers of the G.Robusta in the pictures
seem quite random in their positioning.
I wonder if the stratafication only happens when they get really big? They
are a really spectacular tree. And apart from attracting birds, the bees
seem to like them too.
Regards,
Ed.

Loosecanon wrote:

Grevillea robusta I think pics
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=3990&size=2
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml?pc=a&pn=783&size=2

This is getting upto the big stuff in the genus. Most others are shrubs.
Susceptible to sooty mold in WA.

Richard







--
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Old 02-12-2007, 10:23 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?


"Ed Adamthwaite" wrote in message
...
Hi Richard,
thank you for the links. They helped me to identify a Grevilea Robusta
(about 5M high)over the road from my place. However although very similar
to the type I am talking about, it doesn't have the stratified bands of
flowers across it's foliage. The flowers of the G.Robusta in the pictures
seem quite random in their positioning.
I wonder if the stratafication only happens when they get really big? They
are a really spectacular tree. And apart from attracting birds, the bees
seem to like them too.
Regards,
Ed.

Loosecanon wrote:

Grevillea robusta I think pics
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=3990&size=2
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml?pc=a&pn=783&size=2

This is getting upto the big stuff in the genus. Most others are shrubs.
Susceptible to sooty mold in WA.

Richard







--
Posted at www.Usenet.com.au


Now I am thinking what you are describing is not a Grevillea at all. That
stratification or different layers on the tree sounds like the native
frangapani (Hymemosporum flavum). Anyways here is a pic or 3 of that :

http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=9776&size=2
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=3097&size=2
http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/...sweetshade.jpg

They have a habit of the first branch being at a particular height then the
next is up higher but at different point. The branches spiral up the tree
and unpruned specimens have a shape like a pine tree. That is wide at the
bottom and going upto a point. This tree would fit height wise too.

Cheers

Richard


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Old 03-12-2007, 10:43 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?

Hi Richard,
The plant is definetly a grevillea, not a frangipani. It has the classic
grevillea flower shape with the multiple stamens. The grevillea rubusta
over the road from me has exactly the same flower, its just that the
larger trees I am talking about have a definite "planar" effect with the
way the flowers are grouped. If you take a train ride from Melbourne out
to Lillydale, you'll see hundreds of these trees along the way. They have
the same flower, but the tree looks quite different to the G.robusta
pictures in the first lot of links you sent. Maybe they are a slightly
different cultivar to the G.rubusta.

Regards,
Ed.

Loosecanon wrote:


"Ed Adamthwaite" wrote in message
...
Hi Richard,
thank you for the links. They helped me to identify a Grevilea Robusta
(about 5M high)over the road from my place. However although very similar
to the type I am talking about, it doesn't have the stratified bands of
flowers across it's foliage. The flowers of the G.Robusta in the pictures
seem quite random in their positioning.
I wonder if the stratafication only happens when they get really big? They
are a really spectacular tree. And apart from attracting birds, the bees
seem to like them too.
Regards,
Ed.

Loosecanon wrote:

Grevillea robusta I think pics
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=3990&size=2
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml?pc=a&pn=783&size=2

This is getting upto the big stuff in the genus. Most others are shrubs.
Susceptible to sooty mold in WA.

Richard







--
Posted at www.Usenet.com.au


Now I am thinking what you are describing is not a Grevillea at all. That
stratification or different layers on the tree sounds like the native
frangapani (Hymemosporum flavum). Anyways here is a pic or 3 of that :

http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=9776&size=2
http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml...pn=3097&size=2
http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/...sweetshade.jpg

They have a habit of the first branch being at a particular height then the
next is up higher but at different point. The branches spiral up the tree
and unpruned specimens have a shape like a pine tree. That is wide at the
bottom and going upto a point. This tree would fit height wise too.

Cheers

Richard







--
Posted at www.Usenet.com.au
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Old 05-12-2007, 01:01 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Grevillea? Can anyone identify?

Hi Chookie,
the left-most tree in the picture has a faint suggestion of the planar
bands I am talking about. The trees have probably about 1/3 of the flowers
on them compared to those on your link. It may be that yours are on
steroids. ;-)
I should also mention that this year they seem to be much more prolific
and much brighter than in previous years. Do they flower better in a
drought?

Regards,
Ed.

Chookie wrote:

In article , (Ed Adamthwaite)
wrote:

Hi Richard,
thank you for the links. They helped me to identify a Grevilea Robusta
(about 5M high)over the road from my place. However although very similar
to the type I am talking about, it doesn't have the stratified bands of
flowers across it's foliage. The flowers of the G.Robusta in the pictures
seem quite random in their positioning.
I wonder if the stratafication only happens when they get really big? They
are a really spectacular tree. And apart from attracting birds, the bees
seem to like them too.


Grevillea robusta do get those bands of flowers when the branches are big
enough. YOu can see it in the leftmost plant in this pic:

http://latimes.image2.trb.com/lanews...5/30141444.jpg

Is that what you mean?




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