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Old 15-02-2010, 04:55 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Can't we all just say 'infinity' and let it go?

Continually feeding these pointless conversations is drowning the ng in
fresh, steaming, *unrotted* manure.

Y'know, you don't *have* to respond when someone posts something that
disagrees with you. Just let it go and we'll all feel better.

My garden is drooping at the moment. Well, we're watering, but the lawn
is overgrown and the beds need a bit of weeding and extra mulch. It's
been so hot and humid, no one feels like getting out and doing the usual
maintenance. We keep telling each other 'Tomorrow, when it's cooler...',
but it never seems to be cool enough!

The beans and peas have got mildew because I (mistakenly) planted too
many plants too close together. The watermelon has covered everything
and we have a glut of melons which is getting more and more worrying.
The family and neighbours are heartily sick of me asking 'Would you like
another melon?' Not only that, but the butternut pumpkin has met up with
and conjoined itself to the melon vine. There are umpteen little yellow
pear-shaped pumpkins growing among the many melons and I'm visualising
pots and pots of pumpkin soup and a plethora of pumpkin pies - oh dear!

LOL! And to think I nearly planted several watermelon and pumpkin
seedlings! One of each is quite enough, thank you.

Inside, I've put a Venus Fly Trap and a Pitcher Plant on my kitchen
windowsill (only for decoration, you understand). In the first week, the
Pitcher Plant entrapped a European Wasp that managed to make its way
inside, so I'm chuffed about that. Venus Fly Trap is a bit languid at
the moment, but I feel she'll come good when her traps have enlarged a
bit. It never occurred to me that my carnivorous plants might actually
carnivorate, but they did! Lucky me! ;-

For the first time in memory, all our African Violets have carked it! My
DS is in charge of those, as he has quite a way with Afro Violets.
Nevertheless, the Great Heat this year has dried them out phenomenally
and despite DS' best efforts, they've all turned up their sepals and
gone to meet the Great Gardener. Shame, that.

One extremely nice thing about our garden is that, since we removed all
the feelthy steenking palm trees, we no longer get liberally sprinkled
with ripe, steaming bat-shit. This is a blessing and I do smile to
myself as I listen to the bubble of bats in the tree four doors down.
They're lovely to watch from a distance, but you really don't want bats
flying over your clothesline. Or, indeed, your white dog!

Finally, a Blue-Tongue has had babies somewhere in our yard and there's
all these little baby Blueys pottering about. I think I mentioned a
while back that one turned up underneath my bed! This means I have to be
vigilant about the foul and disgusting Indian Mynas, who seem to enjoy
crown-roast of baby Bluey very much. If anyone's got any clever ideas
about scaring them away (the mynas, not the blueys) - aside from rushing
outdoors, waving a fly swatter or wooden spoon and screeching like a
madwoman...

!!!

.... I'd love to hear of it.

And that's my little garden at the moment.

How about everyone else?

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia

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Old 15-02-2010, 05:13 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Trish Brown wrote:
Can't we all just say 'infinity' and let it go?

Continually feeding these pointless conversations is drowning the ng in
fresh, steaming, *unrotted* manure.

Y'know, you don't *have* to respond when someone posts something that
disagrees with you. Just let it go and we'll all feel better.


Hear hear

How about everyone else?

My tomatoes are finally ripening - but this year, for the first time, the possums are having a go at them so I
am having to pick them half-ripe and let them ripen indoors. There are lots of apples the possums could have
with my blessing but they seem to have changed their eating habits

At least I've finally got them out of the roof and all the entrances blocked off - but did they like the brand
new house I put up in a tree for them (as required by the Dept.of Environment who rented me the possum trap;
one can no longer remove them from the property even if said property is only a one & a half acre block)? -
of course not, they have now burrowed into the woodpile.

--
Anne Chambers
SE South Australia

anne dot chambers at bigpond dot com
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Old 15-02-2010, 06:43 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"Trish Brown" wrote in message
...
Can't we all just say 'infinity' and let it go?

Continually feeding these pointless conversations is drowning the ng in
fresh, steaming, *unrotted* manure.

Y'know, you don't *have* to respond when someone posts something that
disagrees with you. Just let it go and we'll all feel better.

My garden is drooping at the moment. Well, we're watering, but the lawn is
overgrown and the beds need a bit of weeding and extra mulch. It's been so
hot and humid, no one feels like getting out and doing the usual
maintenance. We keep telling each other 'Tomorrow, when it's cooler...',
but it never seems to be cool enough!

The beans and peas have got mildew because I (mistakenly) planted too many
plants too close together. The watermelon has covered everything and we
have a glut of melons which is getting more and more worrying. The family
and neighbours are heartily sick of me asking 'Would you like another
melon?' Not only that, but the butternut pumpkin has met up with and
conjoined itself to the melon vine. There are umpteen little yellow
pear-shaped pumpkins growing among the many melons and I'm visualising
pots and pots of pumpkin soup and a plethora of pumpkin pies - oh dear!

LOL! And to think I nearly planted several watermelon and pumpkin
seedlings! One of each is quite enough, thank you.

Inside, I've put a Venus Fly Trap and a Pitcher Plant on my kitchen
windowsill (only for decoration, you understand). In the first week, the
Pitcher Plant entrapped a European Wasp that managed to make its way
inside, so I'm chuffed about that. Venus Fly Trap is a bit languid at the
moment, but I feel she'll come good when her traps have enlarged a bit. It
never occurred to me that my carnivorous plants might actually
carnivorate, but they did! Lucky me! ;-

For the first time in memory, all our African Violets have carked it! My
DS is in charge of those, as he has quite a way with Afro Violets.
Nevertheless, the Great Heat this year has dried them out phenomenally and
despite DS' best efforts, they've all turned up their sepals and gone to
meet the Great Gardener. Shame, that.

One extremely nice thing about our garden is that, since we removed all
the feelthy steenking palm trees, we no longer get liberally sprinkled
with ripe, steaming bat-shit. This is a blessing and I do smile to myself
as I listen to the bubble of bats in the tree four doors down. They're
lovely to watch from a distance, but you really don't want bats flying
over your clothesline. Or, indeed, your white dog!

Finally, a Blue-Tongue has had babies somewhere in our yard and there's
all these little baby Blueys pottering about. I think I mentioned a while
back that one turned up underneath my bed! This means I have to be
vigilant about the foul and disgusting Indian Mynas, who seem to enjoy
crown-roast of baby Bluey very much. If anyone's got any clever ideas
about scaring them away (the mynas, not the blueys) - aside from rushing
outdoors, waving a fly swatter or wooden spoon and screeching like a
madwoman...

!!!

... I'd love to hear of it.

And that's my little garden at the moment.

How about everyone else?

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia


The other day I left the tank water tap on when giving the dogs a drink. The
rain atm is helping to make up for my booboo. The pumpkins are going beserk.


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Old 15-02-2010, 08:36 AM posted to aus.gardens
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/lurk

On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 15:55:36 +1100, Trish Brown wrote:

[...] If anyone's got any clever ideas
about scaring them away (the mynas, not the blueys) - aside from rushing
outdoors, waving a fly swatter or wooden spoon and screeching like a
madwoman...


Well, that worked quite well when SWMBO did it. They were beating up on
a magpie, and when she dived outdoors with a broom in hand and whacked a
couple over the head, the noisy miners joined in and drove them away.
Since then, and since we've been giving the last scraps of rice to the
noisy miners, they and the magpies are proving quite efficient at
keeping the Indian mynas away.

[...]
How about everyone else?


Chili explosion here at Blackalls Park. We have two cayenne chili bushes
that won't stop producing, and we've given away a large number, and
minced and fermented a quart jar's worth of chili and garlic paste, and
we eat about 6-10 fresh chilis each week, and they keep on coming. Now
the jalapeño bush is producing well too (hmmm... ranch beans!) and our
tabasco chili bush has ~50 little fiery buggers on it and they've
started ripening.

Ginger, turmeric, and galangal have erupted during the wet rainy summer.
Well, the galangal popped up in spring, but has stuck up another spike
or two each over summer. One of my taro corms is raging away with plenty
of leaves, while the other is still presenting short green spikes that
don't go anywhere.

Still stuffing about with other bits, not much other than chilis and
herbs making their way into the kitchen lately.

The mozzies are back in abundance. #$%^. ZzzzzzZZZZ!...zzzzZZZ! :/
--
Ross McKay, Toronto, NSW Australia
"Tuesday is Soylent Green day"
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Old 15-02-2010, 10:50 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Anne Chambers wrote:
Trish Brown wrote:
Can't we all just say 'infinity' and let it go?

Continually feeding these pointless conversations is drowning the ng
in fresh, steaming, *unrotted* manure.

Y'know, you don't *have* to respond when someone posts something that
disagrees with you. Just let it go and we'll all feel better.


Hear hear

How about everyone else?

My tomatoes are finally ripening - but this year, for the first time,
the possums are having a go at them so I am having to pick them
half-ripe and let them ripen indoors. There are lots of apples the
possums could have with my blessing but they seem to have changed
their eating habits
At least I've finally got them out of the roof and all the entrances
blocked off - but did they like the brand new house I put up in a
tree for them (as required by the Dept.of Environment who rented me
the possum trap; one can no longer remove them from the property even
if said property is only a one & a half acre block)? - of course
not, they have now burrowed into the woodpile.


For some reason I cannot see posts from Trish (no you are not sinbinned) so
I will have to tag on here.

The season has been kind to us with good rain and despite continued high
humidity not much in the way of fungus and mould.

The pasture is looking great, we could run twice as many horses at the
moment as they are all fat and cannot keep up with it. All except one old
dear who is wasting away from a mystery illness. She has been on
supplementary feeding for three months and eats grass with the rest all day.
She ought to be spherical with what she is eating but instead just skin and
bones. I am checking out sites for a big hole. She has taken a liking to
mulberry leaves so I replaced the net to keep her out. Running late to go
out the other day I glanced at the orchard to find her inside the net. It
was like one of those weird performance artists who wrap up common objects
or paint large animals in living rooms. Just standing there patiently, no
fuss, waiting for me to get her out. I have no idea how she got in there.
The mulberrys will recover.

Mootilda the cow is settling in well. She and the horses have reached a
negotiated settlement. I can now get up to her and touch her without any
problem, I know it is just cupboard love because as soon as it is clear that
I have no food for her she wanders off but it is s good sign that she is not
totally afaid of getting near people. I now have to build some yards and
bails so that she can have a visit from the lady with the syringe.

The vege garden is looking like a picture book. Herbs and cutting greens
have self-seeded all over the place and the cucurbits are plotting world
domination. The asparagus is way over my head and next spring looks like
being a good cut. The stone fruit did very well and the pear trees are
loaded to breaking point , now if I can just remember when to pull them ....

I have found a new cultivar of beans which is very impressive in my
environment. Not from any of the recognised sources nor from a crazy old
aunt. So many of those, including Diggers so-called lazy houswife
(stringless my foot) have drawbacks. This one is a bush bean that is robust
and produces loads of genuinely stringless pods. Found everywhere and
disparaged by some - Mrs Fothergills. Also I grew yellow pear tomatoes for
the first time. They are very good; a small sweet salad tom that looks like
a yellow pear about 4cm long.

We took kilos of tomatoes and cucmbers to the new Gloucester farmers market
last Saturday, I am still waiting to see how much sold but it was looking
good. If anybody is interested as either buyer or seller I will post
details.

There have been a few disappointments. The second round of corn didn't get
fertilised correcly and the ears are very underweight. I cannot get in
front of the snails. I slay them in their hundreds, clean up all their
hiding places etc etc but still they come. But sun is shining and all is
right with world.

David



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Old 16-02-2010, 12:30 AM posted to aus.gardens
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David Hare-Scott wrote:

For some reason I cannot see posts from Trish (no you are not sinbinned)
so I will have to tag on here.


Ooo, I hope not! I do try to be good, y'know.


The season has been kind to us with good rain and despite continued high
humidity not much in the way of fungus and mould.

The pasture is looking great, we could run twice as many horses at the
moment as they are all fat and cannot keep up with it. All except one
old dear who is wasting away from a mystery illness. She has been on
supplementary feeding for three months and eats grass with the rest all
day. She ought to be spherical with what she is eating but instead just
skin and bones. I am checking out sites for a big hole. She has taken
a liking to mulberry leaves so I replaced the net to keep her out.
Running late to go out the other day I glanced at the orchard to find
her inside the net. It was like one of those weird performance artists
who wrap up common objects or paint large animals in living rooms. Just
standing there patiently, no fuss, waiting for me to get her out. I
have no idea how she got in there. The mulberrys will recover.


I'm assuming you've wormed everyone in your paddock? If this mare's
carrying a heavy worm-load, it would explain her doing so poorly on good
feed. A vet would find out for sure (although you'll pay for it... try
offering him some tomatoes instead!)

Three quarters fill a bucket with rolled oats (NOT seed oats, mind, but
rolled ones: you can get 'em from most feed merchants). Top up with
boiling water, stir and let it stand until it's mostly cooled. You can
add a number of taste-tempters, from a handful of salt to a dipper of
bran (only if the horse is used to it, though) to a splodge of treacle
or molasses. Most horses will knock you down for treacle/molasses, so
I'd recommend it for this poor old mare.

The reasoning behind the rolled oats is that the husks can irritate an
inflamed gut, as can bran or pollard. Nice, mushy rolled oats seems to
work quite well. It's good for skinny dogs too.

Mootilda the cow is settling in well. She and the horses have reached a
negotiated settlement. I can now get up to her and touch her without
any problem, I know it is just cupboard love because as soon as it is
clear that I have no food for her she wanders off but it is s good sign
that she is not totally afaid of getting near people. I now have to
build some yards and bails so that she can have a visit from the lady
with the syringe.


Killjoy! Poor Mootilda!

The vege garden is looking like a picture book. Herbs and cutting
greens have self-seeded all over the place and the cucurbits are
plotting world domination. The asparagus is way over my head and next
spring looks like being a good cut. The stone fruit did very well and
the pear trees are loaded to breaking point , now if I can just remember
when to pull them ....

I have found a new cultivar of beans which is very impressive in my
environment. Not from any of the recognised sources nor from a crazy
old aunt. So many of those, including Diggers so-called lazy houswife
(stringless my foot) have drawbacks. This one is a bush bean that is
robust and produces loads of genuinely stringless pods. Found
everywhere and disparaged by some - Mrs Fothergills. Also I grew yellow
pear tomatoes for the first time. They are very good; a small sweet
salad tom that looks like a yellow pear about 4cm long.

We took kilos of tomatoes and cucmbers to the new Gloucester farmers
market last Saturday, I am still waiting to see how much sold but it was
looking good. If anybody is interested as either buyer or seller I will
post details.


Ever made tomato jam? It's *delicious*!

There have been a few disappointments. The second round of corn didn't
get fertilised correcly and the ears are very underweight. I cannot get
in front of the snails. I slay them in their hundreds, clean up all
their hiding places etc etc but still they come. But sun is shining and
all is right with world.

David

Yeah, my corn was a disappointment too: little shrivelly ears with gaps
in the cobs.

My Great Hope for the future is a wall-full of sweet peas. Wish me luck!!!

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 16-02-2010, 12:31 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Anne Chambers wrote:

My tomatoes are finally ripening - but this year, for the first time,
the possums are having a go at them so I am having to pick them
half-ripe and let them ripen indoors. There are lots of apples the
possums could have with my blessing but they seem to have changed their
eating habits

At least I've finally got them out of the roof and all the entrances
blocked off - but did they like the brand new house I put up in a tree
for them (as required by the Dept.of Environment who rented me the
possum trap; one can no longer remove them from the property even if
said property is only a one & a half acre block)? - of course not, they
have now burrowed into the woodpile.


I saw a ringtail possum scooting along the power lines just recently. I
had no idea they could do that, but this little bloke was as surefooted
as if he were waddling along his home-tree. They're noisy and smelly and
annoying if they get too tame... but *so* cute to look at! ;-

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 16-02-2010, 12:33 AM posted to aus.gardens
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SG1 wrote:

The other day I left the tank water tap on when giving the dogs a drink.


Bugger!

The rain atm is helping to make up for my booboo. The pumpkins are going beserk.


I reckon you could probably see them growing if you were willing to
stand there for an hour or so and watch. DH is about to go out and build
a trellisy arrangment to keep the vines out of the rose garden. Talk
about peripatetic! (The vines, not the husband...)

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 16-02-2010, 12:41 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Ross McKay wrote:
/lurk

On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 15:55:36 +1100, Trish Brown wrote:

[...] If anyone's got any clever ideas
about scaring them away (the mynas, not the blueys) - aside from rushing
outdoors, waving a fly swatter or wooden spoon and screeching like a
madwoman...


Well, that worked quite well when SWMBO did it. They were beating up on
a magpie, and when she dived outdoors with a broom in hand and whacked a
couple over the head, the noisy miners joined in and drove them away.
Since then, and since we've been giving the last scraps of rice to the
noisy miners, they and the magpies are proving quite efficient at
keeping the Indian mynas away.


Will try the broomystick method and report back. I hate Indian Mynas!!!

[...]
How about everyone else?


Chili explosion here at Blackalls Park.


Oooahhh! I'm at Wallsend! G'day, neighbour. ;-D

We have two cayenne chili bushes
that won't stop producing, and we've given away a large number, and
minced and fermented a quart jar's worth of chili and garlic paste, and
we eat about 6-10 fresh chilis each week, and they keep on coming. Now
the jalapeño bush is producing well too (hmmm... ranch beans!) and our
tabasco chili bush has ~50 little fiery buggers on it and they've
started ripening.


My chilis and capsicums have done pretty well, only the #($^#@%@
European Wasps have continually gotten at them all season. I've put up
traps for the rotten creatures, and had some success at first. Now, I
can't find anything they'll go into the traps for (not even chilis or
capsicums).

Ginger, turmeric, and galangal have erupted during the wet rainy summer.
Well, the galangal popped up in spring, but has stuck up another spike
or two each over summer. One of my taro corms is raging away with plenty
of leaves, while the other is still presenting short green spikes that
don't go anywhere.

Still stuffing about with other bits, not much other than chilis and
herbs making their way into the kitchen lately.

The mozzies are back in abundance. #$%^. ZzzzzzZZZZ!...zzzzZZZ! :/


You're not wrong the we've got tiny little black ones that always
seem to bite where you can't reach 'em. I don't s'pose you'd get Hexham
Greys out where you are? We live about a block away from the edge of
Hexham Swamp and so we get a few from there. They seem to have made a
comeback in recent years and I can't say I think that's a good thing.

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 16-02-2010, 02:12 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Trish Brown wrote:
SG1 wrote:

The other day I left the tank water tap on when giving the dogs a
drink.


Bugger!

The rain atm is helping to make up for my booboo. The pumpkins are
going beserk.


I reckon you could probably see them growing if you were willing to
stand there for an hour or so and watch. DH is about to go out and
build a trellisy arrangment to keep the vines out of the rose garden.
Talk about peripatetic! (The vines, not the husband...)


DH? Dear Hubby? You have to watch those initialisms.

I once was at a meeting which included social policy types who were talking
about DSEs when another bloke whispered to me "why are they talking about
sheep?" I had to explain that they meant Designated Spouse Equivalents not
Drenched Sheep Equivalents.

Then there was the time I got into terrible trouble talking about
Predetermined Motion Time Standards (I am not making this up it actaully
happened).

David



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Old 16-02-2010, 03:09 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"Trish Brown" wrote in message
...
Ross McKay wrote:
/lurk

On Mon, 15 Feb 2010 15:55:36 +1100, Trish Brown wrote:

[...] If anyone's got any clever ideas about scaring them away (the
mynas, not the blueys) - aside from rushing outdoors, waving a fly
swatter or wooden spoon and screeching like a madwoman...


Well, that worked quite well when SWMBO did it. They were beating up on
a magpie, and when she dived outdoors with a broom in hand and whacked a
couple over the head, the noisy miners joined in and drove them away.
Since then, and since we've been giving the last scraps of rice to the
noisy miners, they and the magpies are proving quite efficient at
keeping the Indian mynas away.


Will try the broomystick method and report back. I hate Indian Mynas!!!

[...]
How about everyone else?


Chili explosion here at Blackalls Park.


Oooahhh! I'm at Wallsend! G'day, neighbour. ;-D

We have two cayenne chili bushes
that won't stop producing, and we've given away a large number, and
minced and fermented a quart jar's worth of chili and garlic paste, and
we eat about 6-10 fresh chilis each week, and they keep on coming. Now
the jalapeño bush is producing well too (hmmm... ranch beans!) and our
tabasco chili bush has ~50 little fiery buggers on it and they've
started ripening.


My chilis and capsicums have done pretty well, only the #($^#@%@ European
Wasps have continually gotten at them all season. I've put up traps for
the rotten creatures, and had some success at first. Now, I can't find
anything they'll go into the traps for (not even chilis or capsicums).

Ginger, turmeric, and galangal have erupted during the wet rainy summer.
Well, the galangal popped up in spring, but has stuck up another spike
or two each over summer. One of my taro corms is raging away with plenty
of leaves, while the other is still presenting short green spikes that
don't go anywhere.

Still stuffing about with other bits, not much other than chilis and
herbs making their way into the kitchen lately.

The mozzies are back in abundance. #$%^. ZzzzzzZZZZ!...zzzzZZZ! :/


You're not wrong the we've got tiny little black ones that always seem
to bite where you can't reach 'em. I don't s'pose you'd get Hexham Greys
out where you are? We live about a block away from the edge of Hexham
Swamp and so we get a few from there. They seem to have made a comeback in
recent years and I can't say I think that's a good thing.

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia

I remember the days when based at Williamtown (not a RAAF type though) when
SWMBO and myself used to visit folk at West Wallsend.


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Old 16-02-2010, 03:47 AM posted to aus.gardens
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On Tue, 16 Feb 2010 13:12:15 +1100, David Hare-Scott wrote:

Trish Brown wrote:
SG1 wrote:

The other day I left the tank water tap on when giving the dogs a
drink.


Bugger!

The rain atm is helping to make up for my booboo. The pumpkins are
going beserk.


I reckon you could probably see them growing if you were willing to
stand there for an hour or so and watch. DH is about to go out and
build a trellisy arrangment to keep the vines out of the rose garden.
Talk about peripatetic! (The vines, not the husband...)


DH? Dear Hubby? You have to watch those initialisms.

I once was at a meeting which included social policy types who were
talking about DSEs when another bloke whispered to me "why are they
talking about sheep?" I had to explain that they meant Designated
Spouse Equivalents not Drenched Sheep Equivalents.

Then there was the time I got into terrible trouble talking about
Predetermined Motion Time Standards (I am not making this up it actaully
happened).

David


Sorry David, but normal usage for DSE is not as quoted; it is DRY SHEEP
EQUIVALENT/S. See below:

"The stocking rate of pastures is the number of animals
per unit area of land, irrespective of the amount of
forage available.

Dry sheep equivalents (DSE)
The dry sheep equivalent is widely accepted in Australia
as the livestock unit to which the feed requirements of
other types of livestock can be related most satisfactorily.
DSE’s are also used when comparing the profitability of
different farming enterprises.
A DSE is the estimated energy required to maintain the
body weight of a two year old wether" Merino sheep (a
non-breeding animal) weighing 45 kg."

For one reference (and there are many other sites):
http://www.australianboergoat.com.au/index2.php?
option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=32&Itemid=27

Keep smiling
anm

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Old 16-02-2010, 11:16 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"Trish Brown" wrote in message

This means I have to be
vigilant about the foul and disgusting Indian Mynas, who seem to enjoy
crown-roast of baby Bluey very much. If anyone's got any clever ideas
about scaring them away (the mynas, not the blueys) -


Put "Indian Myna trap" into google and you'll get hundreds of hits.


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Old 16-02-2010, 11:21 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"David Hare-Scott" wrote in message

Mootilda the cow is settling in well. She and the horses have reached a
negotiated settlement. I can now get up to her and touch her without any
problem, I know it is just cupboard love because as soon as it is clear
that I have no food for her she wanders off but it is s good sign that she
is not totally afaid of getting near people. I now have to build some
yards and bails so that she can have a visit from the lady with the
syringe.


You asked some time ago about keeping Mootilda healthy and at the time
although I answered, I wasn't really focussed. I've thought about it since
and I'd advise 5 in 1 for a few years (unless you know her status, in which
case, if she's had a few years of shots don't bother overly - all her calves
religiously), lice control and if you get liver fluke in your area, once a
year application of flukacide.


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Old 16-02-2010, 11:25 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"David Hare-Scott" wrote in message
...

I once was at a meeting which included social policy types who were
talking about DSEs when another bloke whispered to me "why are they
talking about sheep?" I had to explain that they meant Designated Spouse
Equivalents not Drenched Sheep Equivalents.


LOL. I bet he laughed at that given that it's Dry Sheep Equivalents.

Then there was the time I got into terrible trouble talking about
Predetermined Motion Time Standards (I am not making this up it actaully
happened).


Even better!




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