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Old 07-06-2010, 06:11 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies

I have always wanted to grow vegetables in my yard but the thing is,
Australian soil is not ideal for growing organic vegetables. Good
thing I read EzyVegies featured in an article. It caught my interest
instantly since EzyVegies Australia has the perfect solution to my
gardening needs. Thanks to EzyVegies and their amazing raised garden
beds, I am now spending my afternoons in my garden, watching my
vegetables grow and soon, I will be able to enjoy my very own organic
vegetables. Visit EzyVegies at http://www.ezyvegies.com.au/

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Old 07-06-2010, 01:03 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies

On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 21:11:37 -0700 (PDT), Ezyveggies groups
wrote:

I have always wanted to grow vegetables in my yard but the thing is,
Australian soil is not ideal for growing organic vegetables. Good
thing I read EzyVegies featured in an article. It caught my interest
instantly since EzyVegies Australia has the perfect solution to my
gardening needs. Thanks to EzyVegies and their amazing raised garden
beds, I am now spending my afternoons in my garden, watching my
vegetables grow and soon, I will be able to enjoy my very own organic
vegetables. Visit EzyVegies at http://www.ezyvegies.com.au/


Your products are a ripoff and very poorly made.

Ask in here for *FREE* ideas.

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Old 07-06-2010, 02:59 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies


wrote in message
...
On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 21:11:37 -0700 (PDT), Ezyveggies groups

wrote:

I have always wanted to grow vegetables in my yard but the thing is,
Australian soil is not ideal for growing organic vegetables. Good
thing I read EzyVegies featured in an article. It caught my interest
instantly since EzyVegies Australia has the perfect solution to my
gardening needs. Thanks to EzyVegies and their amazing raised garden
beds, I am now spending my afternoons in my garden, watching my
vegetables grow and soon, I will be able to enjoy my very own organic
vegetables. Visit EzyVegies at http://www.ezyvegies.com.au/


Your products are a ripoff and very poorly made.

Ask in here for *FREE* ideas.


I had a look at the site and the raised beds. Is very poorly designed when
people have to kneel down to them. Is the case of why not just plant things
in the ground. They should do themselves a favour by getting them up to hip
height. This will help those with bad backs and those that are wheelchair
bound. Otherwise it is a good looking site.


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Old 08-06-2010, 05:30 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies

"Loosecanon" wrote in message
...
(snip)
vegetables. Visit EzyVegies at ****offspammers.com


Your products are a ripoff and very poorly made.

Ask in here for *FREE* ideas.


I had a look at the site and the raised beds. Is very poorly designed when
people have to kneel down to them. Is the case of why not just plant
things in the ground. They should do themselves a favour by getting them
up to hip height. This will help those with bad backs and those that are
wheelchair bound.


i think (based on what people do & talk about doing) that the point of
raised beds isn't raising them to a height that's actually convenient - it's
more for drainage, or in order to hold new soil (not from one's own yard,
imported soil, if one's own soil is pretty miserable). if you really wanted
a hip-high bed i think you would construct a no-dig garden on a tabletop,
wouldn't you? - you wouldn't have a raised bed that's more than a metre
high, i don't think! the cost of the soil would just be nuts.

Otherwise it is a good looking site.

good-looking isn't really going to help if the product is shite :-)

however, the person who is spamming (and all his 'friends') are apparently
'non-working "moms" ' . i have no earthly idea how a bunch of 'non-working
"moms" ' would have any idea at all what australian soil is like. since we
have soils ranging from unworkable gravel to loam that looks like chocolate
cake, you could quite conveniently disregard this amateurish spam entirely,
loosecanon!
kylie


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Old 08-06-2010, 05:48 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies

On Tue, 08 Jun 2010 03:30:50 +0000, 0tterbot wrote:


i think (based on what people do & talk about doing) that the point of
raised beds isn't raising them to a height that's actually convenient -
it's more for drainage, or in order to hold new soil (not from one's own
yard, imported soil, if one's own soil is pretty miserable). if you
really wanted a hip-high bed i think you would construct a no-dig garden
on a tabletop, wouldn't you? - you wouldn't have a raised bed that's
more than a metre high, i don't think! the cost of the soil would just
be nuts.


Generally drainage, but there is no reason why you can not build them up
to a convenient high to save bending over. You do not have to buy soil,
just scrap an inch over the yard and throw in all your organic matter.

Hint, the bottom doesn't have to be soil, if could be rubble. Ours
started when we put in 200' of drainage channels that I back filled with
bluemetal and we had to have ten piers under part of the house re-
leveled, so we had a mountain of basically heavy clay.

The gotcha is the width of the walls. We have three genuine railway
sleeper side one for ours, but that is 12" of growing space you loose all
around. OTOH, it was the cheapest and strongest raised bed construction
we could get. i never priced any steel bin construction as there was
nothing suitable at the local steel suppliers.

Another thing with raised beds is you really have to keep the nutrient
going into them as that improved drainage can impoverish them rapidly.
And they always seem dry. It isn't uncommong for use to spend 4x$4 on
compost/manure and $20 on mulch each time we plant one out.



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Old 08-06-2010, 11:32 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies

On 07/06/10 14:11, Ezyveggies groups wrote:
I have always wanted to grow vegetables in my yard but the thing is,
Australian soil is not ideal for growing organic vegetables. Good
thing I read EzyVegies featured in an article. It caught my interest
instantly since EzyVegies Australia has the perfect solution to my
gardening needs. Thanks to EzyVegies and their amazing raised garden
beds, I am now spending my afternoons in my garden, watching my
vegetables grow and soon, I will be able to enjoy my very own organic
vegetables. Visit EzyVegies at http://www.ezyvegies.com.au/



Holy crap! I'm building a garden bed out of free 200mm X 75mm (and 50mm)
pieces of timber that I have picked up for free around the
neighbourhood. Byt these EzyVegies for the same size that I'm building
for about $10 worth of screws would cost me 5 X 170 = $850. That's a
whole load of vegies to pay it off!

Lionel.
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Old 09-06-2010, 09:07 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies

"terryc" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 08 Jun 2010 03:30:50 +0000, 0tterbot wrote:


i think (based on what people do & talk about doing) that the point of
raised beds isn't raising them to a height that's actually convenient -
it's more for drainage, or in order to hold new soil (not from one's own
yard, imported soil, if one's own soil is pretty miserable). if you
really wanted a hip-high bed i think you would construct a no-dig garden
on a tabletop, wouldn't you? - you wouldn't have a raised bed that's
more than a metre high, i don't think! the cost of the soil would just
be nuts.


Generally drainage, but there is no reason why you can not build them up
to a convenient high to save bending over. You do not have to buy soil,
just scrap an inch over the yard and throw in all your organic matter.


ok, but for lots of people that would be an even worse solution! i have
areas with no topsoil at all & lots where it is very thin, & that's not
uncommon, is it? the temptation for raised beds is surely primarily amongst
people who have heavy clay with virtually no topsoil - otherwise they'd not
want raised beds.(?)

Hint, the bottom doesn't have to be soil, if could be rubble.


ok. i am just thinking that if you wanted a bed as high as an adult's hip or
waist, no-digs on old tables would be the cheapest, easiest solution using
the least materials & creating the least trouble all around. but indeed a
person could make a raised bed as high as their roof if they really wanted
to :-)

Ours
started when we put in 200' of drainage channels that I back filled with
bluemetal and we had to have ten piers under part of the house re-
leveled, so we had a mountain of basically heavy clay.

The gotcha is the width of the walls. We have three genuine railway
sleeper side one for ours, but that is 12" of growing space you loose all
around. OTOH, it was the cheapest and strongest raised bed construction
we could get. i never priced any steel bin construction as there was
nothing suitable at the local steel suppliers.


afaik, the steel/corrugated tin style arose from people using old corrugated
water tanks to make them from... now they just make them new from the same
stuff! there's no automatic benefit from using this (except you don't "lose"
any of your space, and for the manufacturer it makes them fairly light &
easy to transport i suppose.) i think sleepers look a lot nicer, so that is
the benefit for you. :-)

Another thing with raised beds is you really have to keep the nutrient
going into them as that improved drainage can impoverish them rapidly.
And they always seem dry.


i didn't know this!

It isn't uncommong for use to spend 4x$4 on
compost/manure and $20 on mulch each time we plant one out.


good heavens - i thought you were semi-rural (i.e. can get cheap inputs!)
that is very pricey for each bed...!
i've never been tempted by raised beds. i am not sure why i am participating
in this conversation, actually. heh.
kylie


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Old 09-06-2010, 03:25 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies

On Wed, 09 Jun 2010 07:07:42 +0000, 0tterbot wrote:

good heavens - i thought you were semi-rural (i.e. can get cheap
inputs!) that is very pricey for each bed...!


Sadly not. Rural connections, but not close enough to load up with sheep
droppings. Our previous (very economical) supplier lost his stockpile
land when it was turned into a housing estate.
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Old 13-06-2010, 11:56 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies


"terryc" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 09 Jun 2010 07:07:42 +0000, 0tterbot wrote:

good heavens - i thought you were semi-rural (i.e. can get cheap
inputs!) that is very pricey for each bed...!


Sadly not. Rural connections, but not close enough to load up with sheep
droppings. Our previous (very economical) supplier lost his stockpile
land when it was turned into a housing estate.


That's baaaaaaad!


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Old 14-06-2010, 03:28 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default My Own Organic Garden ;Thanks to EzyVegies

On 7/06/2010 10:59 PM, Loosecanon wrote:
wrote in message
...
On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 21:11:37 -0700 (PDT), Ezyveggies groups

wrote:

I have always wanted to grow vegetables in my yard but the thing is,
Australian soil is not ideal for growing organic vegetables. Good
thing I read EzyVegies featured in an article. It caught my interest
instantly since EzyVegies Australia has the perfect solution to my
gardening needs. Thanks to EzyVegies and their amazing raised garden
beds, I am now spending my afternoons in my garden, watching my
vegetables grow and soon, I will be able to enjoy my very own organic
vegetables. Visit EzyVegies at http://www.ezyvegies.com.au/


Your products are a ripoff and very poorly made.

Ask in here for *FREE* ideas.


I had a look at the site and the raised beds. Is very poorly designed when
people have to kneel down to them. Is the case of why not just plant things
in the ground. They should do themselves a favour by getting them up to hip
height. This will help those with bad backs and those that are wheelchair
bound. Otherwise it is a good looking site.


Why not dig a 3 foot deep trench using a backhoe like I did. Then the
garden beds ARE at hip height. And drainage is superb. You definitely
need small lader and boots, but what the hey, its comfortable enough.
Besides. it helped me trap a fox once.















She's now married to me.
Worst thing I ever trapped...




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