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Old 24-06-2010, 04:53 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Although they are supposed to be poisonous, the leaves on my rhubarb plants
are being regularly eaten back to the stem.
There does not appear to be any caterpillars or snails on them, which would
have been my guess.
Any thoughts as to what the culprits might be?

Davo


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Old 24-06-2010, 10:38 AM posted to aus.gardens
PC PC is offline
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On 24/06/2010 12:53 PM, Davo wrote:
Although they are supposed to be poisonous, the leaves on my rhubarb
plants are being regularly eaten back to the stem.
There does not appear to be any caterpillars or snails on them, which
would have been my guess.
Any thoughts as to what the culprits might be?

Davo

Snails. They dont mind the poison.
Actually they can be quite happy getting high on the stuff, if there's
nothing else to get high on.
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Old 24-06-2010, 08:05 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Rhubarb

g'day davo,

could be leaf hoppers or grass hoppers.

leaves somewaht toxic to humans but not so to bugs hey?

early morning safari should spot them squish them when they are cold
and slower moving, before they get the sun on them.

On Thu, 24 Jun 2010 12:53:08 +1000, "Davo"
wrote:

snipped
--

Matthew 25:13 KJV
"Watch therefore, for ye know neither
the day nor the hour wherein the Son
of man cometh"

Mark 13:33 "Take ye heed, watch and pray:
for ye know not when the time is".

len

With peace and brightest of blessings,

"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."

http://www.lensgarden.com.au/
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Old 25-06-2010, 02:23 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Rhubarb

Davo wrote:
Although they are supposed to be poisonous, the leaves on my rhubarb
plants are being regularly eaten back to the stem.
There does not appear to be any caterpillars or snails on them, which
would have been my guess.
Any thoughts as to what the culprits might be?

Davo


Go out at night with a light and check. I have had snails and grubs on
mine. The treatment is different.

David

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Old 26-06-2010, 05:21 AM posted to aus.gardens
PC PC is offline
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Default Rhubarb

On 24/06/2010 12:53 PM, Davo wrote:
Although they are supposed to be poisonous, the leaves on my rhubarb
plants are being regularly eaten back to the stem.
There does not appear to be any caterpillars or snails on them, which
would have been my guess.
Any thoughts as to what the culprits might be?

Davo

Seems like various opinions here.
Suggest you use the broad spectrum approach.
Snail bait, observation and attack accordingly.
If the snail bait doesn't work, leave the wife out in the garden at
night till she observes something to report.
No point in missing the footy, and tennis...


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Old 26-06-2010, 07:31 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Rhubarb

Thanks for your ideas (PC: I like the way you think!). There are no "snail
trails" or grub droppings anywhere near the plants, so I tended to look
elsewhere. The whole leaf (but not the stem) seems to go basically
overnight - to my way of thinking, too fast for either snails or grubs.
Has anybody ever heard of possums with a liking for this type of thing? I'm
thinking of making a couple of birdwire frames to put over a couple of
plants and comparing them with uncovered plants after a few weeks.

"PC" wrote in message
...
On 24/06/2010 12:53 PM, Davo wrote:
Although they are supposed to be poisonous, the leaves on my rhubarb
plants are being regularly eaten back to the stem.
There does not appear to be any caterpillars or snails on them, which
would have been my guess.
Any thoughts as to what the culprits might be?

Davo

Seems like various opinions here.
Suggest you use the broad spectrum approach.
Snail bait, observation and attack accordingly.
If the snail bait doesn't work, leave the wife out in the garden at night
till she observes something to report.
No point in missing the footy, and tennis...


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Old 26-06-2010, 10:18 AM posted to aus.gardens
PC PC is offline
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Default Rhubarb

On 26/06/2010 3:31 PM, Davo wrote:
Thanks for your ideas (PC: I like the way you think!). There are no
"snail trails" or grub droppings anywhere near the plants, so I tended
to look elsewhere. The whole leaf (but not the stem) seems to go
basically overnight - to my way of thinking, too fast for either snails
or grubs.
Has anybody ever heard of possums with a liking for this type of thing?
I'm thinking of making a couple of birdwire frames to put over a couple
of plants and comparing them with uncovered plants after a few weeks.

"PC" wrote in message
...
On 24/06/2010 12:53 PM, Davo wrote:
Although they are supposed to be poisonous, the leaves on my rhubarb
plants are being regularly eaten back to the stem.
There does not appear to be any caterpillars or snails on them, which
would have been my guess.
Any thoughts as to what the culprits might be?

Davo

Seems like various opinions here.
Suggest you use the broad spectrum approach.
Snail bait, observation and attack accordingly.
If the snail bait doesn't work, leave the wife out in the garden at
night till she observes something to report.
No point in missing the footy, and tennis...



You could be right This is what I found for you...
Pests are rarely a problem. Slugs and snails can wreak a bit of havoc
with the leaves, but this is mostly an issue of cosmetics. Flavour is
unaffected. In my garden possums are the main threat to our enjoyment of
rhubarb and apple for dessert. Believe it or not, they manage to eat the
leaves without being poisoned, and in the space of a week, entire plants
can be chomped almost to ground level.

One final word of warning: rhubarb leaves are high in oxalic acid. In
other words they’re poisonous, and if you manage to chew through around
five kilograms of the things, they’ll probably kill you. Seriously
though, it’s best to leave them to the possums, and make full use of the
stems. Rhubarb and apple – I can taste it now!
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Old 02-07-2010, 08:49 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Rhubarb

PC writes:
You could be right This is what I found for you...
Pests are rarely a problem. Slugs and snails can wreak a bit of havoc
with the leaves, but this is mostly an issue of cosmetics. Flavour is
unaffected. In my garden possums are the main threat to our enjoyment of
rhubarb and apple for dessert. Believe it or not, they manage to eat the
leaves without being poisoned, and in the space of a week, entire plants
can be chomped almost to ground level.


That's interesting about the possums. They eat eucalyptus tips, so their
system must be almost as robust as a koala's.

One final word of warning: rhubarb leaves are high in oxalic acid. In
other words they're poisonous, and if you manage to chew through around
five kilograms of the things, theyï'll probably kill you. Seriously
though, it's best to leave them to the possums, and make full use of the
stems. Rhubarb and apple � I can taste it now!


I recall hearing that, way back in time, in England (or was it Europe?),
rhubarb leaves were commonly cooked as a green vegetable, esp. during
winter when there was a general shortage of fresh vegetables. I guess
it does lose some of the oxalic acid to the cooking water. Evidently,
most people could tolerate the rhubarb leaves cooked and eaten in that
way, but there were a few who couldn't tolerate this and suffered kidney
damage (due to the high oxalic content) and some of these inevitably died.
It seemed to be accepted that a few would sicken and die, while the
majority benefitted from eating their winter green supplement.

You will see it recommended that people with any kidney disease not
consume French sorrel because of its oxalic acid.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)


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