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Old 19-12-2011, 10:38 PM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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Default The Christmas Kooka

La Nino is the boy child who comes to visit at Christmas some years and who
takes our rain. Here is one of the rare visitors of a La Nina year when it
is wet. This season makes your tomatoes and squash wilt with fungus. You
will note the distinctive lichen which develops only during high humidity
and constant showers, there is some on the post too. It only lasts a week,
already it seems she has had too much holiday spirit and some of the growth
has fallen out. By Sunday she will be back to her old self.

http://s1086.photobucket.com/albums/j444/HareScott/

Happy holiday!

David


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Old 20-12-2011, 12:34 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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On Dec 19, 1:38*pm, "David Hare-Scott" wrote:
La Nino is the boy child who comes to visit at Christmas some years and who
takes our rain. *Here is one of the rare visitors of a La Nina year when it
is wet. *This season makes your tomatoes and squash wilt with fungus. You
will note the distinctive lichen which develops only during high humidity
and constant showers, there is some on the post too. *It only lasts a week,
already it seems she has had too much holiday spirit and some of the growth
has fallen out. *By Sunday she will be back to her old self.

http://s1086.photobucket.com/albums/j444/HareScott/

Happy holiday!

David


DAvid, pull yourself together! You are slaughtering the Spanish
language. No such thing as LA NINO. A boy child would be EL NINO.
Then we are suddenly precipitated into LA NINA, a whole other kettle
of fish.

VBG

HB
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Old 20-12-2011, 12:51 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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Default The Christmas Kooka

On 12/19/11 1:38 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:
La Nino is the boy child who comes to visit at Christmas some years and who
takes our rain. Here is one of the rare visitors of a La Nina year when it
is wet. This season makes your tomatoes and squash wilt with fungus. You
will note the distinctive lichen which develops only during high humidity
and constant showers, there is some on the post too. It only lasts a week,
already it seems she has had too much holiday spirit and some of the growth
has fallen out. By Sunday she will be back to her old self.

http://s1086.photobucket.com/albums/j444/HareScott/

Happy holiday!

David


Where I live, El Niño brings rain, sometimes torrential. My hill tried
to become part of my lawn during two different El Niño winters. See my
http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_back.html#hill.

La Niña brings drought.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html
Gardening diary at http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary
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Old 20-12-2011, 01:33 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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Default The Christmas Kooka

Higgs Boson wrote:
On Dec 19, 1:38 pm, "David Hare-Scott" wrote:
La Nino is the boy child who comes to visit at Christmas some years
and who takes our rain. Here is one of the rare visitors of a La
Nina year when it is wet. This season makes your tomatoes and squash
wilt with fungus. You will note the distinctive lichen which
develops only during high humidity and constant showers, there is
some on the post too. It only lasts a week, already it seems she has
had too much holiday spirit and some of the growth has fallen out.
By Sunday she will be back to her old self.

http://s1086.photobucket.com/albums/j444/HareScott/

Happy holiday!

David


DAvid, pull yourself together! You are slaughtering the Spanish
language. No such thing as LA NINO. A boy child would be EL NINO.
Then we are suddenly precipitated into LA NINA, a whole other kettle
of fish.

VBG

HB


Maybe his parent dressed him in pink.

D


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Old 20-12-2011, 01:35 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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Default The Christmas Kooka

David E. Ross wrote:
On 12/19/11 1:38 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:
La Nino is the boy child who comes to visit at Christmas some years
and who takes our rain. Here is one of the rare visitors of a La
Nina year when it is wet. This season makes your tomatoes and
squash wilt with fungus. You will note the distinctive lichen which
develops only during high humidity and constant showers, there is
some on the post too. It only lasts a week, already it seems she
has had too much holiday spirit and some of the growth has fallen
out. By Sunday she will be back to her old self.

http://s1086.photobucket.com/albums/j444/HareScott/

Happy holiday!

David


Where I live, El Niño brings rain, sometimes torrential. My hill
tried to become part of my lawn during two different El Niño winters.
See my http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_back.html#hill.

La Niña brings drought.


So you are on the west coast of the USA? That's how it works, when the bath
water sloshes up one end it is down at the other. I bet you don't get
kookaburras with red crests though.

D



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Old 23-12-2011, 06:54 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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Default The Christmas Kooka

David Hare-Scott wrote:
David E. Ross wrote:
On 12/19/11 1:38 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:
La Nino is the boy child who comes to visit at Christmas some years
and who takes our rain. Here is one of the rare visitors of a La
Nina year when it is wet. This season makes your tomatoes and
squash wilt with fungus. You will note the distinctive lichen which
develops only during high humidity and constant showers, there is
some on the post too. It only lasts a week, already it seems she
has had too much holiday spirit and some of the growth has fallen
out. By Sunday she will be back to her old self.

http://s1086.photobucket.com/albums/j444/HareScott/

Happy holiday!

David


Where I live, El Niño brings rain, sometimes torrential. My hill
tried to become part of my lawn during two different El Niño winters.
See my http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_back.html#hill.

La Niña brings drought.


So you are on the west coast of the USA? That's how it works, when the
bath water sloshes up one end it is down at the other. I bet you don't
get kookaburras with red crests though.

D


Our kookaburras are all on strike, it seems! Maybe the Corellas and
SCCockatoos moved 'em along...

But just this week, we've had a huge Blue Tongue in our bathroom, a
Water Skink in the living room and a Blind Snake on the front verandah.
The reptiles must all be having their Christmas parties early!

Now, if only someone would move that blasted Koel along. He's driving me
MAD!!!!

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 23-12-2011, 08:39 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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Default The Christmas Kooka

Trish Brown wrote:
David Hare-Scott wrote:
David E. Ross wrote:
On 12/19/11 1:38 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:
La Nino is the boy child who comes to visit at Christmas some years
and who takes our rain. Here is one of the rare visitors of a La
Nina year when it is wet. This season makes your tomatoes and
squash wilt with fungus. You will note the distinctive lichen which
develops only during high humidity and constant showers, there is
some on the post too. It only lasts a week, already it seems she
has had too much holiday spirit and some of the growth has fallen
out. By Sunday she will be back to her old self.

http://s1086.photobucket.com/albums/j444/HareScott/

Happy holiday!

David


Where I live, El Niño brings rain, sometimes torrential. My hill
tried to become part of my lawn during two different El Niño
winters. See my
http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_back.html#hill. La Niña brings
drought.


So you are on the west coast of the USA? That's how it works, when
the bath water sloshes up one end it is down at the other. I bet you
don't get kookaburras with red crests though.

D


Our kookaburras are all on strike, it seems! Maybe the Corellas and
SCCockatoos moved 'em along...


I am in the middle of a clan war between two families of kookaburras. They
come to the power pole near the house to have a laugh-in to advertise their
territory.

But just this week, we've had a huge Blue Tongue in our bathroom, a
Water Skink in the living room and a Blind Snake on the front
verandah. The reptiles must all be having their Christmas parties
early!


No reptiles getting too friendly here but if it warms up we will see some.


Now, if only someone would move that blasted Koel along. He's driving
me MAD!!!!


You have to cut down all the large trees nearby so they will go and call
somewhere else :-)

David

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Old 28-12-2011, 10:16 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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David Hare-Scott wrote:

snip

Now, if only someone would move that blasted Koel along. He's driving
me MAD!!!!


You have to cut down all the large trees nearby so they will go and call
somewhere else :-)

David


Hah! No, *you* have to come and cut all the tall trees down!

I tell you, the damn bird's driving me nutso.

'Ooooo-oo!' he says, 'Ooooo-oo! Ooooo-oo!'

And as if to make matters worse, there's a tribe of Figbirds hangin'
around as well and *they* make a noise like last year's office party
about an hour before everyone passed out.

'WoopWoopWoopWoop-WOOOO!'

What is it with the bird world? Whatever happened to good ol' 'Tweet'?

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 29-12-2011, 02:29 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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Billy wrote:

Instead of ruing your fate, you may want to celebrate your sounds of
nature. The are many places in the U.S. where the only sound is the
background rumbling of traffic, or no sound at all in the wastelands of
housing tracts.


Y'know, you're absolutely right!

I really do love the many sounds of Nature at our place. It's just...
the bird in question (also known as 'the brain-fever bird) has an
extremely monotonous, ongoing call that *never* lets up. They even call
through the night! After a few weeks of that, I'm sure you can
understand why people get a tad impatient. ;D

Other than Mr Koel, we also have a flock of two hundred or so Sulphur
Crested Cockatoos that flies over our house a few times a day. They're
*deafening* (ie. you can't hear yourself speaking), but I usually bid
them a cheery 'G'day' because they're gorgeous, especially on clear
sunny summer days like today. The pure white of the flock as it wheels
across the sky is stunning. Then, in the right light, you see glimpses
of the sulphur-coloured feathers in their armpits. Lovely!

We get Galahs too: they're a smaller pink-and-grey parrot with equally
raucous voices. Oh, and Corellas (white). Rainbow Lorikeets
(multi-coloured). Eastern Rosellas (multi-coloured). Crimson Rosellas
(red/blue) and King Parrots (red/green). Then, of course, there's the
overhead passers-by, like pelicans and egrets, herons and ibises. Very
occasionally, there'll be something exciting, like a Spotted Harrier, a
Sea Eagle, a Wedge-Tailed Eagle or the nifty little Australian Falcon
who lives on top of our local hospital with his missus. He's *deadly*:
so fast, you barely know you've seen him streaking by!

Reptiles are pretty plentiful too. We get big fat Blue Tongue lizards (a
big female will grow to about eighteen inches or so) that eat the snails
and slugs for us. There's all sorts of medium-sized skinks and then the
occasional Bearded Dragon or Water Dragon might visit. For a few years,
we had a Red-bellied Black Snake living under our house (name of
Snidely). He was *great*. We never saw a single mouse in the house when
Snidely was living with us!

I've counted five species of frogs in our garden and we encourage those
by giving them lots of begonias to hide in and a pond for their - er -
courtship requirements. I *love* the frog-music at night, especially
when it's been raining. They all seem to want to sing in the rain and so
we have a chorus of Gene Kelly wannabes to serenade us to sleep.

I hope this hasn't been too much raving on, but you reminded me how
lucky I am to live where I do. I couldn't bear not being surrounded by
living things! Here in Oz, even city-dwellers like me can have that.

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 29-12-2011, 05:46 PM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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In article om,
Trish Brown wrote:

Billy wrote:

Instead of ruing your fate, you may want to celebrate your sounds of
nature. The are many places in the U.S. where the only sound is the
background rumbling of traffic, or no sound at all in the wastelands of
housing tracts.


Y'know, you're absolutely right!

I really do love the many sounds of Nature at our place. It's just...
the bird in question (also known as 'the brain-fever bird) has an
extremely monotonous, ongoing call that *never* lets up. They even call
through the night! After a few weeks of that, I'm sure you can
understand why people get a tad impatient. ;D

Other than Mr Koel, we also have a flock of two hundred or so Sulphur
Crested Cockatoos that flies over our house a few times a day. They're
*deafening* (ie. you can't hear yourself speaking), but I usually bid
them a cheery 'G'day' because they're gorgeous, especially on clear
sunny summer days like today. The pure white of the flock as it wheels
across the sky is stunning. Then, in the right light, you see glimpses
of the sulphur-coloured feathers in their armpits. Lovely!

We get Galahs too: they're a smaller pink-and-grey parrot with equally
raucous voices. Oh, and Corellas (white). Rainbow Lorikeets
(multi-coloured). Eastern Rosellas (multi-coloured). Crimson Rosellas
(red/blue) and King Parrots (red/green). Then, of course, there's the
overhead passers-by, like pelicans and egrets, herons and ibises. Very
occasionally, there'll be something exciting, like a Spotted Harrier, a
Sea Eagle, a Wedge-Tailed Eagle or the nifty little Australian Falcon
who lives on top of our local hospital with his missus. He's *deadly*:
so fast, you barely know you've seen him streaking by!

Reptiles are pretty plentiful too. We get big fat Blue Tongue lizards (a
big female will grow to about eighteen inches or so) that eat the snails
and slugs for us. There's all sorts of medium-sized skinks and then the
occasional Bearded Dragon or Water Dragon might visit. For a few years,
we had a Red-bellied Black Snake living under our house (name of
Snidely). He was *great*. We never saw a single mouse in the house when
Snidely was living with us!

I've counted five species of frogs in our garden and we encourage those
by giving them lots of begonias to hide in and a pond for their - er -
courtship requirements. I *love* the frog-music at night, especially
when it's been raining. They all seem to want to sing in the rain and so
we have a chorus of Gene Kelly wannabes to serenade us to sleep.

I hope this hasn't been too much raving on, but you reminded me how
lucky I am to live where I do. I couldn't bear not being surrounded by
living things! Here in Oz, even city-dwellers like me can have that.


Your Kookaburra sounds similar to our Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus
pileatus), although it sounds as if you have way more birds than I do.
http://www.enature.com/fieldguides/d...searchText=woo
dpecker&cmdSubmit.x=13&cmdSubmit.y=10&GroupID=&cur GroupID=1&lgfromWhere=&
curPageNum=4

I attribute, in part, the lack of bad bugs in my garden to the bird
feeder, and bath which attracts chickadees (Chestnut-backed Chickadee
[Poecile rufescens]).

We also have many blue Jays that are really quite Stellar, but no one is
going to confuse them with songbirds.

Newcastle, and its environs, looks to be a very nice place.
--

Billy

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the clouds of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron.
- Dwight D. Eisenhower, 16 April 1953


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Old 30-12-2011, 02:32 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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PhoenixWench wrote:

I am so jealous ;-)
Granted I have lots of wonderful wildlife here in the Catskills of New
York, but I guess anyone undervalues the commonplace and yours sound so
marvelously exotic ;-)
Happily I haven't been dealing with any Whippoorwills lately - their
song is loud, monotonous and endless, usually at about 3AM :-P


'Exotic'?

I would *so* love to see a Hummingbird!

And -

an Elf Owl
a squirrel
a salamander
a Snowy Owl
a Pileated Woodpecker (actually, *any* woodpecker would do...)
a moose
a grackle
a cardinal

I could go on and on. I'd even love to see and hear a Whippoorwill. We
have a similar creature called a Tawny Frogmouth, but yours sounds so
exotic! ;D

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 30-12-2011, 02:49 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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Billy wrote:

Your Kookaburra sounds similar to our Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus
pileatus), although it sounds as if you have way more birds than I do.


The Kookaburra is a great big kingfisher in shades of buff and
chocolate. They like to eat snakes and frogs and small birds, but most
of all, they like to laugh maniacally at the misfortunes of human
beings. A tribe of four or six of them will gather on a power pole and
laugh for a good ten or fifteen minutes to announce their presence. It's
a great sound and very loud while it lasts. Everyone smiles when the
Kookas are laughing.

(NB. It's pronounced 'cook-a-burra' with the emphasis on the first
syllable).


I attribute, in part, the lack of bad bugs in my garden to the bird
feeder, and bath which attracts chickadees (Chestnut-backed Chickadee
[Poecile rufescens]).

We also have many blue Jays that are really quite Stellar, but no one is
going to confuse them with songbirds.


Oh! Lucky! I s'pose the closest bird we'd have to a Chickadee would be
our tiny Fairy Wrens or maybe our Flame Robins (which are really
flycatchers, but let's not split hairs). A friend once sent me a feather
from a Stellar's Jay and it has pride of place among my natural history
collection.

Newcastle, and its environs, looks to be a very nice place.


It really is! We have a great climate and excellent beaches and access
to all sorts of ecosystems ranging from extensive sand dunes to coastal
heath to temperate rainforest to mediterranean wine-producing country.
The city itself is full of trees (and therefore, wildlife), but the
atmosphere is much more laid back and relaxed compared to Sydney. You
should visit. ;D

PS. The best thing: our main street ends about a block away from the
Pacific Ocean.

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 30-12-2011, 04:14 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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PhoenixWench wrote:

Come visit, by all means! In summer I have 30 hummingbird feeders, and
at twilight when they are betting finished for the day they come to my
place for a nightcap - sometimes over 100 at a time ;-) The wings sound
like someone kicked over a bee hive and the chirping is supersonic!!!!


I can't imagine what that must be like! ;D


Plus we have regular grey squirrels, occasional black ones, little reds
and the ubiquitous chipmunks.

I did see a pair of Pileated woodpeckers doing their mating dance around
a tree trunk once, but my suet feeders are more likely to attract red
headed, red bellied, downy and hairy woodpeckers.

I've seen a great horned owl, some sort of very small white owl, and
heard many unidentified others. Of couse we also get bald eagles in the
area - gorgeous!

As for grackles and cardinals - they visit my feeding stations, along
with chickadees, tufted titmouses (titmice?) red winged blackbirds, and
legions of starlings ;-)


Hah! See? You've got your own line of 'exotic'. We have Starlings too,
but the more recently introduced Indian Mynas have driven most of them away.

I have a little motel, so if you ever do decide to visit I think I can
accommodate you ;-)


If only...! ;D

These pages have some pix you might enjoy
http://www.flickr.com/photos/phoenixwench/page4/


http://www.flickr.com/photos/phoenixwench/page11/



Oh YES! Wonderful video of the hummingbirds and I really enjoyed
checking out your other pics as well. Thanks for sharing!

--
Trish Brown {|:-}

Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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Old 30-12-2011, 08:41 AM posted to rec.gardens,aus.gardens
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On Fri, 30 Dec 2011 14:06:46 +1000, atec77 wrote:

On 30/12/2011 1:14 PM, Trish Brown wrote:
Hah! See? You've got your own line of 'exotic'. We have Starlings too,
but the more recently introduced Indian Mynas have driven most of them
away.


Nothing a slug gun doesn't fix with almost noiseless impact


The noise comes from firing the rifle itself I would think and not
from the impact.


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