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Old 18-07-2003, 11:24 PM
Red
 
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Default Critter identification

Have a look at these 3 pics here

http://optusnet.com.au/~softfix/

What is it?

Is it a young earwig or whiteant/termite gulp

Red


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Old 18-07-2003, 11:35 PM
Red
 
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Default Critter identification

On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 07:07:16 +1000, Red wrote:

Have a look at these 3 pics here

http://optusnet.com.au/~softfix/

What is it?

Is it a young earwig or whiteant/termite gulp


I found this site, I think it is a young earwig. What do you think?

http://www.ivyhall.district96.k12.il...ts/earwig.html

Red
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Old 19-07-2003, 01:22 AM
Jane VR
 
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Default Critter identification

Red wrote:

Have a look at these 3 pics here

http://optusnet.com.au/~softfix/

What is it?

Is it a young earwig or whiteant/termite

Red


This spines at the back make it look like an earwig to me, but maybe you
should show the pictures to a pest control company to make sure.

Jane

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Old 19-07-2003, 01:33 AM
len brauer
 
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g'day red,

i'm going with earwig as well, to the best of my knowledge most
termites are white or whitish, and generally you find many more than
one when you find them.

talk to the pest man to be sure.

len

snipped
--
happy gardening
'it works for me it could work for you,'

"in the end ya' gotta do what ya' gotta do" but consider others and the environment
http://hub.dataline.net.au/~gardnlen/
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Old 19-07-2003, 02:02 AM
Red
 
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On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 09:31:02 +1000, len brauer wrote:

i'm going with earwig as well, to the best of my knowledge most
termites are white or whitish, and generally you find many more than
one when you find them.


I have seen a white one but not sort of translucent as the pics of termites that
I have looked at.

I'll see what other responses I get, Thanks Len & Jane

Red


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Old 19-07-2003, 02:24 AM
Trish Brown
 
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Default Critter identification

Red wrote:

Have a look at these 3 pics here

http://optusnet.com.au/~softfix/

What is it?

Is it a young earwig or whiteant/termite gulp

Red


Red, you don't say how big it is. I'm assuming it's pretty small, since you say
it could be a termite. While the 'terminal cerci' (that's what those things at
the end are called) remind me of an earwig, the creature just doesn't appear
flat enough... And an earwig's cerci are supposed to be inwardly recurved and
this one's aren't. They curve upward.

So my vote would be for a cave cricket nymph (whose Family name I've completely
forgotten, just when I want to quote it!) =:-0

The cave cricket is a member of the grasshopper family that lives in caves and
under houses. They grow pretty large (maybe three inches long?) and have
antennae as long or longer than their bodies. I reckon your critter could be a
baby one.
--
Trish {|:-}
Newcastle, NSW, Australia

PS. Aha! I looked in 'Insects of Australia' and find the animal I *think* it is
would be from the Superfamily Rhaphidophoridae. Dunno if that helps?

PPS. Diagnostic features of crickets (from 'Insects of Australia') a
eyes are present or greatly reduced?
the number of segments in the tarsus (foot)
whether a tympanum is present (it's a small 'spot' on the forelimb)

If you can answer these questions, then someone from the CSIRO might be able to
help.

Here's a site worth looking at:

http://www.ento.csiro.au/aicn/

PPPS Sorry for the essay! I get carried away! :-(
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Old 19-07-2003, 06:42 AM
Jock
 
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Default Critter identification

I tend to agree with Trish. The head is obviously cricket and the long
antennae seems to point that way. These things can be like bolt cutters
when they get bigger. Attitude +!
Jock

"Trish Brown" wrote in message
...
Red wrote:

Have a look at these 3 pics here

http://optusnet.com.au/~softfix/

What is it?

Is it a young earwig or whiteant/termite gulp

Red


Red, you don't say how big it is. I'm assuming it's pretty small, since

you say
it could be a termite. While the 'terminal cerci' (that's what those

things at
the end are called) remind me of an earwig, the creature just doesn't

appear
flat enough... And an earwig's cerci are supposed to be inwardly recurved

and
this one's aren't. They curve upward.

So my vote would be for a cave cricket nymph (whose Family name I've

completely
forgotten, just when I want to quote it!) =:-0

The cave cricket is a member of the grasshopper family that lives in caves

and
under houses. They grow pretty large (maybe three inches long?) and have
antennae as long or longer than their bodies. I reckon your critter could

be a
baby one.
--
Trish {|:-}
Newcastle, NSW, Australia

PS. Aha! I looked in 'Insects of Australia' and find the animal I *think*

it is
would be from the Superfamily Rhaphidophoridae. Dunno if that helps?

PPS. Diagnostic features of crickets (from 'Insects of Australia') a
eyes are present or greatly reduced?
the number of segments in the tarsus (foot)
whether a tympanum is present (it's a small 'spot' on the forelimb)

If you can answer these questions, then someone from the CSIRO might be

able to
help.

Here's a site worth looking at:

http://www.ento.csiro.au/aicn/

PPPS Sorry for the essay! I get carried away! :-(




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Old 25-07-2003, 01:12 AM
Red
 
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Default Critter identification

On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 10:25:58 +1000, Trish Brown wrote:

Red, you don't say how big it is.


Sorry, it is about 6mm long.

I'm pretty sure it is a young earwig, I did see a whitish one while searching
for them. I have only found them under some timber on the ground.
The timber is sound though, I'll keem an eye on it.

Thanks

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Old 01-09-2003, 02:12 AM
Kathy
 
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Default Critter identification

Hi Red,
Have seen heaps of your critters here in the Northern Territory...(Darwin)
they're crickets.
Check out the CSIRO site at
http://www.ento.csiro.au/Ecowatch/Or...orthoptera.htm
I think you will find your critter is a Gryllotalpidae (mole cricket) or a
Gryllidae.

Happy hunting

Cheers
Kathy

"Red" wrote in message
...
Have a look at these 3 pics here

http://optusnet.com.au/~softfix/

What is it?

Is it a young earwig or whiteant/termite gulp

Red





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