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Old 07-02-2005, 12:19 PM
John White
 
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Default How can I kill a Liquid Amber?

Hi group. I'm hoping somene out there can help with an answer.

About three and a half years ago we had two Liquid Amber trees removed from
the front of out house (after getting c ouncil approval of course).

They were planted far too close to the front of our house and the roots were
beginning to cause damage, block sewers etc.

Since then I have been fighting a seemingly never-ending battle with new
plants growing from the roots. Because of where the trees were located it
was not possible to get the stumps ground when the trees were removed.

The aborist that removed the trees, said that if I kept on poisoning the
shoots as they sprung up the tree would eventually die, but 42 months down
the track, the things still show no sign of dying anytime soon.

Can anyone help?


John W



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Old 07-02-2005, 10:06 PM
Trish Brown
 
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John White wrote:

Hi group. I'm hoping somene out there can help with an answer.

About three and a half years ago we had two Liquid Amber trees removed from
the front of out house (after getting c ouncil approval of course).

They were planted far too close to the front of our house and the roots were
beginning to cause damage, block sewers etc.

Since then I have been fighting a seemingly never-ending battle with new
plants growing from the roots. Because of where the trees were located it
was not possible to get the stumps ground when the trees were removed.

The aborist that removed the trees, said that if I kept on poisoning the
shoots as they sprung up the tree would eventually die, but 42 months down
the track, the things still show no sign of dying anytime soon.

Can anyone help?


John W


I've had a very similar experience with a fifty-year-old crepe myrtle
that *would not* die! The only success we had (after ripping up sucker
after sucker after sucker for many years), was to dig up the extensive
root system as far as we could trace it and then drill into the
unpullable woody bits, filling the holes with Round Up. It died after that.

I think you'll be surprised how extensive Liquidamber roots are! They go
on for miles and are very hard to remove. I think you'll need to pull up
at least some of them in order to reduce your suckering problem. Of
course, the more 'at risk' the parent plant is (and you can't get much
more 'at risk' than 'removed', can you?) the more the remaining roots
will try to sucker in an effort to keep the organism going.

I don't know whether digging down to the woody root each time a sucker
surfaces and then poisoning the *root*, not the sucker might help. Might
be worth a try?

--
Trish {|:-}
Newcastle, Australia


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