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Old 11-09-2005, 05:56 PM
Al
 
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Default Drying bamboo?

I live in Southern California. My neighbor has had a "forest" of giant,
clumping bamboo growing in his yard for about 30 years. He is now
re-landscaping his yard and getting rid of the beautiful bamboo. I've
already got some of his "clumps" in my yard that I hope will grow strong.



In any case, I now have a large number of cut bamboo poles from 1.5" to more
than 5" across and 40'+ long.



I have a number of future uses for these but I need to find the best way to
dry.



Would it be better to cut the poles to about 12' (I won't need anything this
long) or should I try to dry in longer/shorter lengths?



I have a large yard and can stack or stand. Is it better to dry horizontal
or standing?



Thanks in advance!!



Al





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Old 14-09-2005, 04:22 PM
bouzouki
 
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Al wrote:
I live in Southern California. My neighbor has had a "forest" of giant,
clumping bamboo growing in his yard for about 30 years. He is now
re-landscaping his yard and getting rid of the beautiful bamboo. I've
already got some of his "clumps" in my yard that I hope will grow strong.



In any case, I now have a large number of cut bamboo poles from 1.5" to more
than 5" across and 40'+ long.



I have a number of future uses for these but I need to find the best way to
dry.



Would it be better to cut the poles to about 12' (I won't need anything this
long) or should I try to dry in longer/shorter lengths?



I have a large yard and can stack or stand. Is it better to dry horizontal
or standing?



Thanks in advance!!



Al





I can't give you any expert advice, only my experience. I live in VA
and the bamboo I've dried (max diameter about 3.5") did the best when I
had it slung by ropes in an "open" shed. Something where it could stay
dry yet had air circulation. It seemed to be harder,had a nice mellow
color, and did not mold. I have a big peice, about 6.0" diameter that
has stood upright in a bedroom closet for about 3 years and it is hard
as a brick and looks good. I have some on the porch slung on ropes,
about two peices per loop, but it is subject to colleratal damage from
rain and it is still greenish, is flaking, and I will lose about a
section from each end. (longest peice about nine feet) So I guess the
best method is away from moisture as much as possible with opportunity
for air circulation, stored horiziontal. My thinking on the ropes is
that the bamboo can "go" where it wants to as it drys to whatever form
it would take. hope this helps.
mike
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Old 14-09-2005, 07:17 PM
ems
 
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In article , bouzouki
wrote:

Al wrote:
I live in Southern California. My neighbor has had a "forest" of giant,
clumping bamboo growing in his yard for about 30 years. He is now
re-landscaping his yard and getting rid of the beautiful bamboo. I've
already got some of his "clumps" in my yard that I hope will grow strong.



In any case, I now have a large number of cut bamboo poles from 1.5" to
more
than 5" across and 40'+ long.



I have a number of future uses for these but I need to find the best way to
dry.

I also am no expert, as has been pointed out to me on other occasions,
but I will still chip in my two cents worth. As Mike said, good air
circulation is a must. If possible I always try to place fresh cut
bamboo in the direct sunlight for several weeks. I also find that it
seems to dry more quickly and evenly placed vertically. However never
let the ends touch dirt.

Number two... When I lived in Japan, I noticed that they often treat
fresh bamboo with fire to bring out the resins and and harden it. If
you run a torch over the stalk the resin will come to the surface and
you can rub it back in. The heat pushes out moisture and the resin
hardens the surface.

EMS
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Old 15-09-2005, 06:14 AM
bouzouki
 
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Default

ems wrote:
In article , bouzouki
wrote:


Al wrote:

I live in Southern California. My neighbor has had a "forest" of giant,
clumping bamboo growing in his yard for about 30 years. He is now
re-landscaping his yard and getting rid of the beautiful bamboo. I've
already got some of his "clumps" in my yard that I hope will grow strong.



In any case, I now have a large number of cut bamboo poles from 1.5" to
more
than 5" across and 40'+ long.



I have a number of future uses for these but I need to find the best way to
dry.


I also am no expert, as has been pointed out to me on other occasions,
but I will still chip in my two cents worth. As Mike said, good air
circulation is a must. If possible I always try to place fresh cut
bamboo in the direct sunlight for several weeks. I also find that it
seems to dry more quickly and evenly placed vertically. However never
let the ends touch dirt.

Number two... When I lived in Japan, I noticed that they often treat
fresh bamboo with fire to bring out the resins and and harden it. If
you run a torch over the stalk the resin will come to the surface and
you can rub it back in. The heat pushes out moisture and the resin
hardens the surface.

EMS


That would make more sense, to dry it upright, if possible. After all it
grows that way. and the resin thing is cool, I'll have to try it. thanks.
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Old 15-09-2005, 02:27 PM
Al
 
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Default

Thank you for the great suggestions! I'm going to try some heat on a stick
or two this weekend.

Al

"bouzouki" wrote in message
...
ems wrote:
In article , bouzouki
wrote:


Al wrote:

I live in Southern California. My neighbor has had a "forest" of giant,
clumping bamboo growing in his yard for about 30 years. He is now
re-landscaping his yard and getting rid of the beautiful bamboo. I've
already got some of his "clumps" in my yard that I hope will grow
strong.



In any case, I now have a large number of cut bamboo poles from 1.5" to
more than 5" across and 40'+ long.



I have a number of future uses for these but I need to find the best way
to dry.


I also am no expert, as has been pointed out to me on other occasions,
but I will still chip in my two cents worth. As Mike said, good air
circulation is a must. If possible I always try to place fresh cut
bamboo in the direct sunlight for several weeks. I also find that it
seems to dry more quickly and evenly placed vertically. However never
let the ends touch dirt.

Number two... When I lived in Japan, I noticed that they often treat
fresh bamboo with fire to bring out the resins and and harden it. If
you run a torch over the stalk the resin will come to the surface and
you can rub it back in. The heat pushes out moisture and the resin
hardens the surface. EMS


That would make more sense, to dry it upright, if possible. After all it
grows that way. and the resin thing is cool, I'll have to try it. thanks.





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