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Old 06-04-2005, 06:06 PM
Mark Planter
 
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Default Collected large yews and large maple

I recently collected some large trees. They were rescued from a future
construction site (actually, machines are alreadly digging). It was a very short
notice so no special preparations have been done.

Yews (Taxus baccata) have approx. 20cm diameters at the rootbase (not counting
the nebari), the japanese maple (Acer palmatum) has 25cm.

The rootballs were reduced to 80cm across, depth 30cm. Inside the balls the
roots were not disturbed at all.

All trees have been severely chopped, no twigs were left, but all the yews have
tiny shoots (last years, as far as I can tell), and the maple has (already
visible / swelling) red buds on the lower part of the trunk.

The trees (except one yew) were not put directly into (training) pots, but
rather planted into the ground for another year.

As this is the first time I collected such large trees, I'd like to know what
are their chances of survival?

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Old 06-04-2005, 07:21 PM
Michael Persiano
 
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Default

Mark:

Collected materials are almost always a challenge. It's the right time of the year, and you did the right thing by returning them to the ground.

Suggestion:

Water in the collected materials with Root with Mycorrhiza to stimulate root development and to minimize tranplant shock.

Cordially,

Michael Persiano
members.aol.com/iasnob


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Planter
To:
Sent: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 18:06:06 +0200
Subject: [IBC] Collected large yews and large maple


I recently collected some large trees. They were rescued from a future
construction site (actually, machines are alreadly digging). It was a very short

notice so no special preparations have been done.

Yews (Taxus baccata) have approx. 20cm diameters at the rootbase (not counting
the nebari), the japanese maple (Acer palmatum) has 25cm.

The rootballs were reduced to 80cm across, depth 30cm. Inside the balls the
roots were not disturbed at all.

All trees have been severely chopped, no twigs were left, but all the yews have
tiny shoots (last years, as far as I can tell), and the maple has (already
visible / swelling) red buds on the lower part of the trunk.

The trees (except one yew) were not put directly into (training) pots, but
rather planted into the ground for another year.

As this is the first time I collected such large trees, I'd like to know what
are their chances of survival?

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************************************************** ******************************
++++Sponsored, in part, by Edmund Castillo++++
************************************************** ******************************
-- The IBC HOME PAGE & FAQ:
http://www.internetbonsaiclub.org/ --
+++++ Questions? Help? e-mail +++++


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