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Old 23-04-2007, 07:50 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
Hud Hud is offline
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I didn't realize how much work it is to put in a small 5'x8' garden! The
hardest part was stripping the sod and turning the big, heavy chunks of clay
soil with a shovel. Quite a few big rocks came out of that small patch of
ground! I added some sand and 5 big bags of nice, dark soil. The pitch
fork really came in handy for breaking down the chunks and mixing the soil.
I was able to work the soil to a depth of about a foot or more. Today I
busted up more chunks and turned the soil again. The last step was to rake
the soil nice and level. I think it looks pretty good. The wind is kicking
up here in Ohio and it looks like rain is on the way. I'll rake the surface
a few more times during the week and I'm thinking of putting seed (carrots &
green beans) in the ground next weekend if the weather permits.

The satifaction one feels after working even such a small piece of land is
wonderful. I can't wait to plant!




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Old 23-04-2007, 07:58 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Hud wrote:
I didn't realize how much work it is to put in a small 5'x8' garden! The
hardest part was stripping the sod and turning the big, heavy chunks of clay
soil with a shovel. Quite a few big rocks came out of that small patch of
ground! I added some sand and 5 big bags of nice, dark soil. The pitch
fork really came in handy for breaking down the chunks and mixing the soil.
I was able to work the soil to a depth of about a foot or more. Today I
busted up more chunks and turned the soil again. The last step was to rake
the soil nice and level. I think it looks pretty good. The wind is kicking
up here in Ohio and it looks like rain is on the way. I'll rake the surface
a few more times during the week and I'm thinking of putting seed (carrots &
green beans) in the ground next weekend if the weather permits.

The satifaction one feels after working even such a small piece of land is
wonderful. I can't wait to plant!





Don't forget to add some peat...helps immensely with water retention.
Also a hand full of bone meal and some well rotted manure. I add the 3
components to my beds every year. Oh...and some compost as well if you
can get it. Ideally, you want the soil to clump like a snowball in your
hand, keep its shape for a few seconds and slowly fall apart.

The good thing is that once you get all this initial work done, that's
it. Of course, if you're like me, every year you just want to expand.
I've got ten acres of forest and blueberries to work with, so this year
I'm moving three beds and adding one more (all in the one location now),
but that should be it. I don't think I can physically take care of the
any more.

..

Zone 5b in Canada's iced in Far East
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Old 23-04-2007, 08:25 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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The Cook wrote:
On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 14:50:43 -0400, "Hud"
wrote:

I didn't realize how much work it is to put in a small 5'x8' garden! The
hardest part was stripping the sod and turning the big, heavy chunks of clay
soil with a shovel. Quite a few big rocks came out of that small patch of
ground! I added some sand and 5 big bags of nice, dark soil. The pitch
fork really came in handy for breaking down the chunks and mixing the soil.
I was able to work the soil to a depth of about a foot or more. Today I
busted up more chunks and turned the soil again. The last step was to rake
the soil nice and level. I think it looks pretty good. The wind is kicking
up here in Ohio and it looks like rain is on the way. I'll rake the surface
a few more times during the week and I'm thinking of putting seed (carrots &
green beans) in the ground next weekend if the weather permits.


Bean seeds do not like cold soil. They just sit there. Carrots
should be ok.



Yup. Carrots don't mind it. I usually put mine in late April, early May.
They can take up to three weeks to germinate, but go mad after that.
They can also be left in the ground until the snow flys.

..

Zone 5b in Canada's Far East
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Old 23-04-2007, 08:30 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
Hud Hud is offline
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"The Cook" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 14:50:43 -0400, "Hud"
wrote:

I didn't realize how much work it is to put in a small 5'x8' garden! The
hardest part was stripping the sod and turning the big, heavy chunks of
clay
soil with a shovel. Quite a few big rocks came out of that small patch of
ground! I added some sand and 5 big bags of nice, dark soil. The pitch
fork really came in handy for breaking down the chunks and mixing the
soil.
I was able to work the soil to a depth of about a foot or more. Today I
busted up more chunks and turned the soil again. The last step was to
rake
the soil nice and level. I think it looks pretty good. The wind is
kicking
up here in Ohio and it looks like rain is on the way. I'll rake the
surface
a few more times during the week and I'm thinking of putting seed (carrots
&
green beans) in the ground next weekend if the weather permits.


Bean seeds do not like cold soil. They just sit there. Carrots
should be ok.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)



I suppose I can hold off on the beans until the end of May. Also I should
add that I made a little mistake. My garden is actuall 7'x8' (not 5'x8').
I suppose that makes little difference. Lol Thanks for the tip, Susan.


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Old 23-04-2007, 09:19 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Mon, 23 Apr 2007 14:50:43 -0400, "Hud"
wrote:

I didn't realize how much work it is to put in a small 5'x8' garden! The
hardest part was stripping the sod and turning the big, heavy chunks of clay
soil with a shovel. Quite a few big rocks came out of that small patch of
ground! I added some sand and 5 big bags of nice, dark soil. The pitch
fork really came in handy for breaking down the chunks and mixing the soil.
I was able to work the soil to a depth of about a foot or more. Today I
busted up more chunks and turned the soil again. The last step was to rake
the soil nice and level. I think it looks pretty good. The wind is kicking
up here in Ohio and it looks like rain is on the way. I'll rake the surface
a few more times during the week and I'm thinking of putting seed (carrots &
green beans) in the ground next weekend if the weather permits.


Bean seeds do not like cold soil. They just sit there. Carrots
should be ok.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)


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Old 24-04-2007, 03:06 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Hud wrote:

....
The satifaction one feels after working even such a small
piece of land is wonderful. I can't wait to plant!


Be prepared to deal with rabbits and deer!

Dick
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Old 24-04-2007, 08:51 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...
Hud wrote:

....
The satifaction one feels after working even such a small
piece of land is wonderful. I can't wait to plant!


Be prepared to deal with rabbits and deer!

Dick


Thankfully, deer won't be a problem (6' high privacy fence). However I'm
thinking about buying either a chicken wire fence or rabbit fencing to deal
with rabbits. I just worry about them digging to go under it. Has anyone
here used the rabbit fencing? How'd it work?


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Old 25-04-2007, 02:28 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
Ann Ann is offline
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"Hud" expounded:


"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...
Hud wrote:

....
The satifaction one feels after working even such a small
piece of land is wonderful. I can't wait to plant!


Be prepared to deal with rabbits and deer!

Dick


Thankfully, deer won't be a problem (6' high privacy fence). However I'm
thinking about buying either a chicken wire fence or rabbit fencing to deal
with rabbits. I just worry about them digging to go under it. Has anyone
here used the rabbit fencing? How'd it work?

Deer will laugh at a 6' fence.
--
Ann
e-mail address is not checked
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Old 25-04-2007, 03:24 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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"Hud" wrote in message
...

"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...
Hud wrote:

....
The satifaction one feels after working even such a small
piece of land is wonderful. I can't wait to plant!


Be prepared to deal with rabbits and deer!

Dick


Thankfully, deer won't be a problem (6' high privacy fence). However I'm
thinking about buying either a chicken wire fence or rabbit fencing to
deal with rabbits. I just worry about them digging to go under it. Has
anyone here used the rabbit fencing? How'd it work?


We use the cheap plastic rabbit fence and inexpensive fence poles. So far it
works. No rabbits have dug under. The bottom is buried only a few inches
under the soil.


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Old 25-04-2007, 06:07 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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In article ,
Ann wrote:

Deer will laugh at a 6' fence.


Great, we need more laughter in the world.
- Bill
Cloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)


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Old 25-04-2007, 11:56 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Ann said:

"Hud" expounded:


Thankfully, deer won't be a problem (6' high privacy fence). However
I'm thinking about buying either a chicken wire fence or rabbit fencing to
deal with rabbits. I just worry about them digging to go under it. Has
anyone here used the rabbit fencing? How'd it work?

Deer will laugh at a 6' fence.


A privacy fence, though. I was under the impression they were reluctuant
to jump over a fence where they weren't sure of the other side. I know
they can go over 6 or more feet of wire fence.

As for rabbits, a rabbit fence is pretty good protection. I inch hex mesh
(chicken wire) at least 18" sticking up and 6" bent out (or buried) set
along the bottom of any other type of fence works, too.

Groundhogs are a whole different story.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
(attributed to Don Marti)

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Old 25-04-2007, 08:50 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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"Ann" wrote in message
...
"Hud" expounded:


"Dick Adams" wrote in message
...
Hud wrote:

....
The satifaction one feels after working even such a small
piece of land is wonderful. I can't wait to plant!

Be prepared to deal with rabbits and deer!

Dick


Thankfully, deer won't be a problem (6' high privacy fence). However I'm
thinking about buying either a chicken wire fence or rabbit fencing to
deal
with rabbits. I just worry about them digging to go under it. Has anyone
here used the rabbit fencing? How'd it work?

Deer will laugh at a 6' fence.
--
Ann
e-mail address is not checked


Well if deer can jump a 6-foot high privacy fence then I guess it'll be
buffet time for them. lol


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Old 25-04-2007, 08:53 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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"Pat Kiewicz" wrote in message
. ..
Ann said:

"Hud" expounded:


Thankfully, deer won't be a problem (6' high privacy fence). However
I'm thinking about buying either a chicken wire fence or rabbit fencing
to
deal with rabbits. I just worry about them digging to go under it. Has
anyone here used the rabbit fencing? How'd it work?

Deer will laugh at a 6' fence.


A privacy fence, though. I was under the impression they were reluctuant
to jump over a fence where they weren't sure of the other side. I know
they can go over 6 or more feet of wire fence.

As for rabbits, a rabbit fence is pretty good protection. I inch hex mesh
(chicken wire) at least 18" sticking up and 6" bent out (or buried) set
along the bottom of any other type of fence works, too.

Groundhogs are a whole different story.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
(attributed to Don Marti)


Yeah, Pat. I've heard that you can bend the bottom of the fence out like
that. I'll definitely do that.


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Old 26-04-2007, 05:25 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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cloud dreamer writes:
Don't forget to add some peat...helps immensely with water retention.
Also a hand full of bone meal and some well rotted manure.


His beans will do well with the manure; for the carrots it could be
their ruination. Always grow another crop before carrots in newly
manured ground, or the carrots are likely to develop multiple forks
and almost no body.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)
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Old 26-04-2007, 04:10 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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John Savage wrote:
cloud dreamer writes:
Don't forget to add some peat...helps immensely with water retention.
Also a hand full of bone meal and some well rotted manure.


His beans will do well with the manure; for the carrots it could be
their ruination. Always grow another crop before carrots in newly
manured ground, or the carrots are likely to develop multiple forks
and almost no body.



I've always added a little well-rotted composted manure to my beds
before planting. I've yet to have problems with any of my root crops. I
think the problem of forked carrots comes from fresh manure. I've never
had a problem with the bagged composted manure.

..

Zone 5b in Canada's Far East.


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