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Old 19-07-2007, 06:48 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

Every year I have bought onion sets and have had a reasonable success rate
but I am considering, for the coming year, growing from seed. Has anyone any
experience of this and can advise me of the advantages and the
disadvantages.- and, perhaps, suggest any particular variety? I have looke4d
at the on-line catalogues but can't really make up my mind which to go for.



My reasons or wanting to change this year is that, the sets always get too
many small onions that never seem to do very well and, though they grow,
they remain fairly small. Also, I have no idea what type of onion they are
(this is because I buy them from my allotment shop and they don't seem
certain as to the type they've bought!!!)

As regards the position of my garden (which may well make a difference as to
what varieties I can grow) I live in Sussex, not far from the coast.

Regards,

John




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Old 19-07-2007, 03:20 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

In article ,
"John Vanini" wrote:

Every year I have bought onion sets and have had a reasonable success rate
but I am considering, for the coming year, growing from seed. Has anyone any
experience of this and can advise me of the advantages and the
disadvantages.- and, perhaps, suggest any particular variety? I have looke4d
at the on-line catalogues but can't really make up my mind which to go for.



My reasons or wanting to change this year is that, the sets always get too
many small onions that never seem to do very well and, though they grow,
they remain fairly small. Also, I have no idea what type of onion they are
(this is because I buy them from my allotment shop and they don't seem
certain as to the type they've bought!!!)

As regards the position of my garden (which may well make a difference as to
what varieties I can grow) I live in Sussex, not far from the coast.

Regards,

John


I've never grown onions from purchased sets, but my domestic Scallions
come back every year from seeds while the wild ones come back from sets.
The wild ones are weird. The blossoms create sets rather than seeds on
the top of the plant.

I'm still learning about Onions!

I originally harvested the wild ones locally next to a river in
Georgetown Texas.

Too late this year to take pics. I must remember next spring.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 19-07-2007, 06:17 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

On Jul 19, 1:48 am, "John Vanini" wrote:
Every year I have bought onion sets and have had a reasonable success rate
but I am considering, for the coming year, growing from seed. Has anyone any
experience of this and can advise me of the advantages and the
disadvantages.- and, perhaps, suggest any particular variety? I have looke4d
at the on-line catalogues but can't really make up my mind which to go for.

My reasons or wanting to change this year is that, the sets always get too
many small onions that never seem to do very well and, though they grow,
they remain fairly small. Also, I have no idea what type of onion they are
(this is because I buy them from my allotment shop and they don't seem
certain as to the type they've bought!!!)

As regards the position of my garden (which may well make a difference as to
what varieties I can grow) I live in Sussex, not far from the coast.

Regards,

John


I've tried both bunching onions and florence red from seed. Fairly
easy but you got to start early. They're pretty easy to transplant if
you don't mind little tiny plants that's just a stem and roots. I
transplant them while the seed coat is still attached.

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Old 20-07-2007, 12:31 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 07:20:18 -0700, Omelet wrote:

I've never grown onions from purchased sets, but my domestic Scallions
come back every year from seeds while the wild ones come back from sets.
The wild ones are weird. The blossoms create sets rather than seeds on
the top of the plant.

I'm still learning about Onions!

I originally harvested the wild ones locally next to a river in
Georgetown Texas.

Too late this year to take pics. I must remember next spring.


Sounds like Catawissa onions, a native American type of walking onion very
similar to the Old World native Egyptian onion.

Lorenzo L. Love
http://home.thegrid.net/~lllove

“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”
Cicero
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Old 20-07-2007, 09:47 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

Thanks for your replies! Here, in England, I've never heard of a 'walking'
onion so exactly what does it do - how does it walk???? Could be a bit
unnerving to see a herd (flock? gaggle? pride? school?) of these crossing
the road when you're driving along minding your own business!!! Only
kidding! But it brought so ,many amusing pictures into my mind!!!



We are growing tree-onions, which produces, firstly, a strong stem and at
the top of that a cluster of small bulbs. These appear green initially but
then turn brownish-red. They grow to about the size of a small gooseberry.
The onions also grow stems with proper onion flowers which turn to seed.



But you probably knew all that anyway!!



I will grow my own onions from seed next year where I have a more varieties
to choose from. What started me on this idea was that I ran short of onions
from the set so had to but small onion seedlings, rather as James said, and
I wanted to try it,



My regards to all and thank you again!



John




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Old 20-07-2007, 04:09 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

In article [email protected],
"Lorenzo L. Love" wrote:

On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 07:20:18 -0700, Omelet wrote:

I've never grown onions from purchased sets, but my domestic Scallions
come back every year from seeds while the wild ones come back from sets.
The wild ones are weird. The blossoms create sets rather than seeds on
the top of the plant.

I'm still learning about Onions!

I originally harvested the wild ones locally next to a river in
Georgetown Texas.

Too late this year to take pics. I must remember next spring.


Sounds like Catawissa onions, a native American type of walking onion very
similar to the Old World native Egyptian onion.

Lorenzo L. Love


I've heard them called "walking onions" in the past. :-)
The Border Collie has cut my patch size down a bit so I did not harvest
any this year. I let them all go to top sets, and re-fenced an area off
for them.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 20-07-2007, 04:17 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Posts: 1,477
Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

In article ,
"John Vanini" wrote:

Thanks for your replies! Here, in England, I've never heard of a 'walking'
onion so exactly what does it do - how does it walk???? Could be a bit
unnerving to see a herd (flock? gaggle? pride? school?) of these crossing
the road when you're driving along minding your own business!!! Only
kidding! But it brought so ,many amusing pictures into my mind!!!


The blooms produce actual mini-"sets" rather than seeds. They will
sprout wherever they fall but they are only "spring" onions. I start
seeing the greens sprout in late winter, then they bloom and set in the
spring and are totally invisible the rest of the year.

They must be harvested for eating prior to blooming or they have no
flavor.

Due to their reproductive habits, they tend to "walk" from their
original planting spot.

I used to have a lot more until we got the border collie. I'd get tears
mowing the lawn! She tends to stomp all greenery to death as she is a
bit hyperactive.

I did some googling and the onions I have are very small and short, like
commercial Scallions so it looks like they are really the egyptian
walking onions, not the larger variety.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 20-07-2007, 07:13 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

In article ,
Omelet wrote:

In article [email protected],
"Lorenzo L. Love" wrote:

On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 07:20:18 -0700, Omelet wrote:

I've never grown onions from purchased sets, but my domestic Scallions
come back every year from seeds while the wild ones come back from sets.
The wild ones are weird. The blossoms create sets rather than seeds on
the top of the plant.

I'm still learning about Onions!

I originally harvested the wild ones locally next to a river in
Georgetown Texas.

Too late this year to take pics. I must remember next spring.


Sounds like Catawissa onions, a native American type of walking onion very
similar to the Old World native Egyptian onion.

Lorenzo L. Love


I've heard them called "walking onions" in the past. :-)
The Border Collie has cut my patch size down a bit so I did not harvest
any this year. I let them all go to top sets, and re-fenced an area off
for them.


My McNabb's penchant for rutting in the lettuce patch was curbed with a
motion activated sprinkler. Smart dogs.
--
Billy
http://angryarab.blogspot.com/
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Old 20-07-2007, 08:49 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

On Fri, 20 Jul 2007 01:47:10 -0700, John Vanini
wrote:

Thanks for your replies! Here, in England, I've never heard of a
'walking'
onion so exactly what does it do - how does it walk???? Could be a bit
unnerving to see a herd (flock? gaggle? pride? school?) of these crossing
the road when you're driving along minding your own business!!! Only
kidding! But it brought so ,many amusing pictures into my mind!!!



We are growing tree-onions, which produces, firstly, a strong stem and at
the top of that a cluster of small bulbs. These appear green initially
but
then turn brownish-red. They grow to about the size of a small
gooseberry.
The onions also grow stems with proper onion flowers which turn to seed.



But you probably knew all that anyway!!



I will grow my own onions from seed next year where I have a more
varieties
to choose from. What started me on this idea was that I ran short of
onions
from the set so had to but small onion seedlings, rather as James said,
and
I wanted to try it,



My regards to all and thank you again!



John



Ever read "The Day of the Triffids"? Not quite like that.

Walking Onion, tree onion, same, same. That tall stem will break and land
the bulblets (the proper name for the top bulbs) a step away. Each
generation will advance a step. A slow walk but plants are patient.

Lorenzo L. Love
http://home.thegrid.net/~lllove

"You can complain because rosebushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorn
bushes have roses."
Lao Tse (b. 604 BC)

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Old 20-07-2007, 09:08 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

I do not have any luck with sets due to the fact I have a big allotment and
a lot of birds that pull them out .
Likewise the sets availible in the garden ceentres ect. do not give you much
selection.
I grow from seed every year
Variaties
Kelsea very big
Mamouth Red (Robinsons
and for smaller Onions I use a thompson Morgan variaty that gives you bulbs
about 4oz in weight ideal for the kitchen.
It is a long process for good results starting in Late December in an
unheated greenhouse for best results.
Go to the Mamouth Onion Site for full culteral instructions and good seed
It is well worth the effort.
"Lorenzo L. Love" wrote in message
news[email protected]
On Fri, 20 Jul 2007 01:47:10 -0700, John Vanini
wrote:

Thanks for your replies! Here, in England, I've never heard of a
'walking'
onion so exactly what does it do - how does it walk???? Could be a bit
unnerving to see a herd (flock? gaggle? pride? school?) of these crossing
the road when you're driving along minding your own business!!! Only
kidding! But it brought so ,many amusing pictures into my mind!!!



We are growing tree-onions, which produces, firstly, a strong stem and at
the top of that a cluster of small bulbs. These appear green initially
but
then turn brownish-red. They grow to about the size of a small
gooseberry.
The onions also grow stems with proper onion flowers which turn to seed.



But you probably knew all that anyway!!



I will grow my own onions from seed next year where I have a more
varieties
to choose from. What started me on this idea was that I ran short of
onions
from the set so had to but small onion seedlings, rather as James said,
and
I wanted to try it,



My regards to all and thank you again!



John



Ever read "The Day of the Triffids"? Not quite like that.

Walking Onion, tree onion, same, same. That tall stem will break and land
the bulblets (the proper name for the top bulbs) a step away. Each
generation will advance a step. A slow walk but plants are patient.

Lorenzo L. Love
http://home.thegrid.net/~lllove

"You can complain because rosebushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorn
bushes have roses."
Lao Tse (b. 604 BC)





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Old 20-07-2007, 09:25 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

In article
,
Billy Rose wrote:

I've heard them called "walking onions" in the past. :-)
The Border Collie has cut my patch size down a bit so I did not harvest
any this year. I let them all go to top sets, and re-fenced an area off
for them.


My McNabb's penchant for rutting in the lettuce patch was curbed with a
motion activated sprinkler. Smart dogs.
--
Billy


In her case, it's not a matter of rutting in the veggies.

It's a matter of "running with the demons". ;-)

BC's are very active dogs.

A hotwire kept her off the fenceline.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 21-07-2007, 12:03 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

In article ,
Omelet wrote:

In article
,
Billy Rose wrote:

I've heard them called "walking onions" in the past. :-)
The Border Collie has cut my patch size down a bit so I did not harvest
any this year. I let them all go to top sets, and re-fenced an area off
for them.


My McNabb's penchant for rutting in the lettuce patch was curbed with a
motion activated sprinkler. Smart dogs.
--
Billy


In her case, it's not a matter of rutting in the veggies.

It's a matter of "running with the demons". ;-)

BC's are very active dogs.

A hotwire kept her off the fenceline.


Hope you have a good sized yard. Our short-haired Border collie (McNabb)
will come running up the hill and then he runs out of hill and just
keeps going up, like in a cartoon. Smart dog. They can read eye commands
very well. He plays the weirdest game of Frisbee. He fights you for it,
then when it's throw, he chases it down and then proceeds to beat the
snot out of it for ten, fifteen minutes. Then he comes back and taunts
you with it again. A sweet dog who is always plotting with our German
shepherd on how to score on the cat's bowl or our dinner, if we give
them the opportunity.
--
Billy
http://angryarab.blogspot.com/
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Old 21-07-2007, 08:37 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

In article
,
Billy Rose wrote:

In her case, it's not a matter of rutting in the veggies.

It's a matter of "running with the demons". ;-)

BC's are very active dogs.

A hotwire kept her off the fenceline.


Hope you have a good sized yard. Our short-haired Border collie (McNabb)
will come running up the hill and then he runs out of hill and just
keeps going up, like in a cartoon. Smart dog. They can read eye commands
very well. He plays the weirdest game of Frisbee. He fights you for it,
then when it's throw, he chases it down and then proceeds to beat the
snot out of it for ten, fifteen minutes. Then he comes back and taunts
you with it again. A sweet dog who is always plotting with our German
shepherd on how to score on the cat's bowl or our dinner, if we give
them the opportunity.
--
Billy


0.22 acres, fully fenced. It's barely enough.

Border collies never quit moving unless they are snoozing. ;-)

She has helped my sisters corgie to lose some weight!

Right now the front yard is flooded and muddy, so so is the Border
Collie!

Ugh. I might have to take the garden hose to her if she does not clean
herself up tonight. Some of the collie breeds actually do a lot of
self-cleaning like a cat does.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 22-07-2007, 02:50 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Default Onion Seeds versus Onion Sets

Thanks Lorenzo,

I thought they might be the same. I can see where the 'walking' bit comes
from!!

Regards,

John

"Lorenzo L. Love" wrote in message
news[email protected]

Ever read "The Day of the Triffids"? Not quite like that.

Walking Onion, tree onion, same, same. That tall stem will break and land
the bulblets (the proper name for the top bulbs) a step away. Each
generation will advance a step. A slow walk but plants are patient.

Lorenzo L. Love



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Old 24-07-2007, 10:39 PM
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Location: South central England
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Vanini View Post
Every year I have bought onion sets and have had a reasonable success rate
but I am considering, for the coming year, growing from seed. Has anyone any
experience of this and can advise me of the advantages and the
disadvantages.- and, perhaps, suggest any particular variety? I have looke4d
at the on-line catalogues but can't really make up my mind which to go for.



My reasons or wanting to change this year is that, the sets always get too
many small onions that never seem to do very well and, though they grow,
they remain fairly small. Also, I have no idea what type of onion they are
(this is because I buy them from my allotment shop and they don't seem
certain as to the type they've bought!!!)

As regards the position of my garden (which may well make a difference as to
what varieties I can grow) I live in Sussex, not far from the coast.

Regards,

John
I have grown sets this year (Sturon, Setton and Red baron) due to local damp conditions half the sets have grown to a reasonable size but about 50% have either bolted or the leaves have folded over early preventing further growth - these have then lain on the wet ground and started to rot. I have also grown Ailsa Craig from seed - started in Feb under heated conditions in sead tray (on kitchen window sill) and when about 2.5" tall planted out 6" apart in final place in garden

The seed grown onions are still fully upright and continuing to grow while the sets have all collapsed and i am now having to harvest early - some are a good size (5" across) but smaller and less consistent than the seed variety.

Unfortunately Ailsa craig are not renownd for keeping so will be growing Red baron and Rinjsberger from seed next year.


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